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Good age to Neuter tiny male poodle

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Major Humpty

Kiss, hump,- love, win: Its- what i do ;)
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 16, '10 9:26am PST 
Humpty is now 5 months old and only weighs 3 pounds.

He broke his leg a little over a month ago and just got the splint off.

Should I hold off since he is so small and on the mend?

I do not want him to start marking and being bad, but I also do not want to put him at risk, or to much stress.

PS: Don't tell Humpty about this shh

-Kat: Xiao & Humpty's Mom
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The Hounds- of- Bassetville- +3

Food? Where?!?
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 16, '10 12:10pm PST 
I usually wait until my boys are 10 mo - 1 year old before neutering. This allows them to mature. Because Humpty is so tiny, I would definitely wait until he is at least 10 months old.
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Bodhi

Bodhi Wodhi
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 16, '10 4:01pm PST 
I suggest waiting closer to a year if you can as well. Bodhi was done at 7 months b/c he was marking EVERYTHING! lol It "fixed" him immediately winkYour little guy has been through a lot already. I would also suggest getting all the tests run before neutering him b/c he's so small.
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Boston

King of- everything
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 16, '10 7:53pm PST 
I was always told 6 months to a year.
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Henry

I'm the baby,- gotta love me!
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 16, '10 9:18pm PST 
Henry is not neutered, but I'd wait until at least 1-2 years. Marking isn't a "given" with intact males if you train them not to do it. Also, make sure you really want to neuter your little guy. A lot of people tout the benefits but you don't always hear about the risks and problems with neutering (increased incidence of bone cancer, for one).
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Echo

mischief is my- middle name
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 18, '10 4:22pm PST 
Both my male dogs are neutered and they still mark everything. Only outside, though, they ARE housebroken! Everytime I let them out to go potty, they have to make their rounds of the yard and mark the important places before they actually do their business. I just don't want you to think that neutering will solve this!
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Decker

The doggy genius
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 19, '10 8:00am PST 
We suggest neutering at 6 months, but ive had both of my males done as early as 5 months, so they dont have humping issues or marking issues. Waiting to neuter your dog til the 10 months or 1 so they can mature is like when people say its good for your female to go through her first heat( it increases the risk of breast cancer if they have a first heat). I firmly believe in spaying or neutering, non neutered dogs can have prostate cancer or prostate problems, testicular cancer, and other hormonal disorders that can occur. Size doesnt really matter as long as the tesicles are descended they can be removed. We do little tiny 6 pound chihuahuas at 6 months.
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Samson

Work? What's- that?
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 19, '10 9:02am PST 
Waiting to neuter your dog til the 10 months or 1 so they can mature is like when people say its good for your female to go through her first heat

Not really. That is done under a misguided old adage. "Common wisdom" which isn't really that wise. There's no reason to wait for a bitch to go through her first heat if you're planning on an early spay, anyway.

Waiting until physical maturity is done for very real reasons - minimizing health risks.

(it increases the risk of breast cancer if they have a first heat).

Not in any statistically significant way. The statistics I presume you see are misrepresented as absolute risks, when they are actually relative risks. IIRC, any time before the third heat will reduce the risk for breast cancer about the same amount.

I firmly believe in spaying or neutering, non neutered dogs can have prostate cancer or prostate problems, testicular cancer, and other hormonal disorders that can occur.

Intact dogs have a four-fold lower incidence of prostate cancer. It isn't a significant amount (2.4% in altered males, .6% in intact males), but altering does increase risk of prostate cancers.

Most intact dogs develop an enlarged prostate, which is usually asymptomatic, but can have side effects.

Testicular cancer is very rare, and even more rare that a dog dies from it. It is up to the individual whether they consider this a significant enough risk - and I imagine this might change based on breed (Goldens, for example, are at higher risk for most cancers).

As far as hormonal disorders...wouldn't you think that far more likely to occur when you are removing a hormone from a dog's body???

Size doesnt really matter as long as the tesicles are descended they can be removed. We do little tiny 6 pound chihuahuas at 6 months.

This much is true smile. Pediatric neuters *can* help prevent behavior problems like marking & humping, but it isn't a guarantee. A very small advantage of a pediatric neuter is that the recovery time is much, much quicker, although we are weighing a period of a few weeks, against 18-20 years of life (in tiny breeds).

If you plan to alter, it is probably best to wait until physical maturity to reduce the risk of various health problems, but if you feel you can't deal with sexual behaviors which can present in an intact dog - nobody is going to blame you for an early neuter. Your dog and you are meant to co-exist, and if these behaviors make that more difficult...well, I don't believe in pre-emptive surgery to fix behavior problems, but that's my personal view. If you want to minimize the risk of those problems showing up in the first place, an early neuter is fine.

A lot of the health problems too are not so prevalent in smaller breeds (ie: giant breeds are more likely to suffer from skeletal disorders as a result of pediatric neuters). Keep in mind, too, these are only risks - lots of people get puppies from the pound, neutered as early as 4 months or more, and they never have any problems their entire life. It's a risk, not a guarantee.

Whatever age you chose, OP, there are pros and cons. My personal opinion is that those pros and cons even out best after physical maturity - but that is relative to me and my lifestyle. Take a look at yours, and weigh them for yourself smile.

Edited by author Thu Aug 19, '10 9:05am PST

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Decker

The doggy genius
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 19, '10 12:31pm PST 
I supose its all in what you read. Ive always been taught those things I mentioned previously. And i've seen them happen, but thats just my personal experiences. It really is up to you when you have it done.
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Beanster, CD, RN, CGC

We don't - doodle!!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 20, '10 12:49pm PST 
Beanie was neutered at 8 weeks, at just about 1.5 lbs. He is normal in every way, lifts his leg (outside, inside if he thinks I'm not paying attention, lol), doesn't have a weight gain problem (another common myth!), and didn't grow taller than he should have (in fact, he is just 10 inches tall and is supposed to be a mini poodle, not a toy. The beauty of a pediatric neuter is the almost immediate recovery time... the whole process took less than an hour, he came home and was demanding his dinner.

Edited by author Fri Aug 20, '10 12:50pm PST

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