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Your Huskies weight and Age?

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☆ Lacy

If it is mine,- it must never be- yours.
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 27, '09 7:58pm PST 
Lacy is just over a year and is 66lbs, and is extremely lean. The breeding Sire and Dam were very large huskies, both weighing in the upper 60 lb range. She is definitely a fine tuned pulling machine.
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Kiona CGC

The Prettiest- Princess

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 29, '09 10:35pm PST 
I forgot to give the weights and agres for my Siberians, sorry! laugh out loud Both have been on a bit of a diet since our December weigh-ins revealed they had put on a little more than a winter coat, bol!

Kiona:
8.5 years old, 45 lbs
49lbs in December - too much for her
She has been around 42lbs most of her life, but I think 45 is just fine

Luka:
4.5 years old, 53 lbs
58lbs in December - too much for him
He was 48 lbs when we got him but that was WAY too skinny
Sophie

I'm just a- curious george!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 9, '09 8:38am PST 
Dakine - the weight for the age of your husky sounds completely normal to me!

Sophie is 5 months and about 30-35 pounds. My vet says she's perfectly healthy and like others have mentioned, Siberian Huskies are meant to be on the leaner side as they are working dogs.

People always tell me my husky is going to be HUUUGE, but the standard for the female husky is 35-50 pounds, so I wonder if people often confuse the husky with the Alaskan Malamute.
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☆ Lacy

If it is mine,- it must never be- yours.
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 9, '09 9:07pm PST 
I don’t know how many times someone has asked me if Lacy is a Mal. If you’re not familiar with the breed, I could definitely see how someone could confuse the two; especially if an untrained eye views a cross breed of a Husky and a Mal. If they have blue eyes, chances are they are not a purebred Mal, this is a violation of breed standard. Anyway, I'm getting in the weeds. The breeder that I went through has selectively bred dogs on the big side. It just depends on the job you want your Husky to do. But normally females aren’t this big. She’s definitely a drafting dog; her size has slowed her down, which is a good thing when it comes to exercising her.
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Kiona CGC

The Prettiest- Princess

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 12, '09 1:47am PST 
Lacy, you are a beautiful Siberian and I would never mistake you for being anything but! Alas, people not familiar with Siberians (or Mals) often get the two confused and really, who can blame them?

A purebred Malamute will never have blue eyes - it is not just out of standard, I believe it is genetically impossible. A Mal with a blue eye(s) is disqualified because it is almost certainly not a purebred Mal...

Staying in the size standard is one of the first things to go with breeders who are really not great and not adhering to the code of ethics established by the SHCA. Almost ALL the rescue fosters I had were large, only one, Chester, was in standard. Liam, Toby, Jessie, and Sabina were all between 10-20lbs over standard - so it is pretty common to have large Siberians these days.

When people who have only seen pics of Kiona and Luka finally meet them "in person" they almost always say something along the lines of, "Oh my gosh! They are so tiny!! I thought they were bigger!" BOL! I remember the first time I saw correctly proportioned Siberians and I thought the same thing - they are so LITTLE!

Little package, HUGE personality, though! cheer
Koala

the Alaberian- Malamusky
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 12, '09 11:27am PST 
I also used to say that a blue-eyed Mal was impossible, but I've had a couple of reputable breeders of purebred Malamutes tell me they've seen with their own litters a very occasional blue-eyed dog, which of course they do not breed. I don't know, it's an interesting issue.

I have a beautiful blue-eyed Malamute/Siberian Husky fairly even 50/50 cross who at 4 1/2 months is already a lean 50 pounds and 22" at the shoulder! And we've been working hard to grow him slow with proper food, etc. He's going to be a big boy, larger than either the Sibe or even the Mal standard, I think. I have to post new pics, I think he looks more Malamute than Sibe, but the eyes change the whole look. He also has much bigger ears than my previous Mals. Everyone always says 'look at the huge paws on that Husky puppy!' or, 'is that a wolf??' bol. Yeah, a blue-eyed wolf....
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Kiona CGC

The Prettiest- Princess

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 12, '09 12:49pm PST 
Koala, I am almost positive it is genetically impossible for a Malamute to have blue eyes, but I am not sure, either. (and you are incredibly cute, by the way!)

Does anyone know? Or can point us to resources? If it wasn't Easter I'd call some Malamute breeders, bol! laugh out loud But this is an interesting question, and one I have heard convincing arguments for on both sides.

I know Siberians actually have a gene for blue eyes, it is not tied to their coat color like it is for so many other breeds where blue eyes occur (breeds that have merles and the like). I think the answer would depend on whether Malamutes carry a coat color gene that equals blue eyes on occasion or if they never come in a coat color that is tied to blue eyes thereby making it impossible for a Mal to have blue eyes.

In the second case, then, for a Malamute to have blue eyes they would have had to have a Siberian somewhere in their genetic history, or a breed that carries the coat coloring that can lead to blue eyes. thinking

I think I may have to pester Gio, our geneticist expert, for some answers...!! wink

ETA: I think all the Malamute & Siberian owners on dogster should work on making a really good "The Difference Between a Malamute and a Siberian Husky" document... that would be really helpful for people curious about the breeds but not aware they are very different in so many ways...

Edited by author Sun Apr 12, '09 1:05pm PST

Koala

the Alaberian- Malamusky
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 12, '09 1:27pm PST 
Yeah, I've heard both arguments that blue eyes are a recessive gene in Malamutes, but have largely been bred out so it very rare, and I've also heard the argument that it is a genetic impossibility and Mals don't carry the blue-eye gene. I've also heard a fairly logical argument that if it isn't possible, then why would it be a disqualification in the breed standard? I.E, isn't it just a recessive gene that 'they' don't want to encourage in the breed.

I don't think I buy that "Mals don't carry the blue-eye gene" only because scientists have determined in people that we all had brown eyes originally, and blue eyes are actually a genetic mutation affecting the production of melanin in the iris. Therefore it would seem theoretically possible to occur in any breed of dog or human. Now in certain breeds of dog, blue eyes were purposefully bred out. It's possible that even as an evolutionary/instinctual behavior, certain breeds of dog rejected blue eyed dogs as in certain breeds blue eyes make them more prone to cataracts, etc.

I don't know the answer at all, I think the topic is very interesting! I will say that in my opinion, even if possible, it's probably extremely rare, and therefore the vast majority of people claiming their blue eyed dog is a pure Mal are just misinformed.
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Kiona CGC

The Prettiest- Princess

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 12, '09 2:24pm PST 
I have heard the "why disqualify if it isn't possible?" argument, too, and it made perfect sense to me as well.

The just-as-rational response I have heard was that it was implemented in the standard way WAY back when to discourage people from breeding Siberians to Malamutes. At that time there was considerable debate over what a proper Malamute looked like, and there was concern some breeders were not being entirely honest about their bloodlines.. since blue eyes were only found in Siberians at the time, it was a way to prevent less than scrupulous breeders from claiming Siberian-mixed Mals were actually purebred Mals.

But, yes, I need to contact Gio and found out if she can offer any opinion about the genetic aspect of this whole thing, because I just don't know.
Gio

CD RE (CKC)- RXMCL (CARO) FM- CGN SJATD
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 12, '09 6:42pm PST 
Hi all!

Kiona pointed me in the direction of this thread, asking if I could lend an opinion. I honestly don't know much about Mals or Sibes, other than the fact that I think they are absolutely gorgeous! laugh out loud

Unfortunately, I don't really have many answers. Genetic research on the molecular level (ie. actually identifying genes and mutations that cause physical traits) is a very new area of science and most research has been done on bacteria, zebra fish, mice, and then applied to humans. Sort of "whatever is easiest, followed by whatever is most 'important'". Dog genetic research is in its very infancy and there are only a very few groups in the world working on dog genetic problems.

We do know that one form of blue eyes in dogs is caused by the merle gene, PMEL17. It results in "heterochromia irides" ... literally, multicolored irises. It most often manifests itself as "blotchy" colored eyes, where there can be both brown and blue on the same eye. Sometimes it appears as if an eye is solid blue or brown, but that is just random occurrence and still considered heterochromia irides if it is present with the merle coat color. Aside from merle, there is no known coat color that is linked specifically to coat color. It is postulated that brown color (ie. the dog has brown nose and pad leather in addition to brown fur) is linked to lighter colored or yellow-ish eyes, but the actual scientific mechanism behind that isn't determined, and it remains in the realm of breeder lore.

Solid blue eyes (either one eye or both) can occur in a number of breeds, but is often not accepted. Something to consider when it comes to breed standards ... if a color is mentioned in the breed standard as being unacceptable, that most often means that at some point in the breed history that color was present in the breed but modern breeders have decided that they don't want the color anymore. Otherwise, why would they mention it? So, I haven't checked out the Mal standard, but if it states that blue eyes are not allowed, I would wager to bet that at some point in the breed's history blue eyes WERE allowed and that it is just a "recent" decision to not allow blue eyes for one reason or another. If the breed NEVER had the occurrence of blue eyes, now or in the past, then there would be no need to mention that trait at all in the standard, as it would never appear naturally anyways.

Based on that, IF blue eyes is counted as a stated disqualification in Mals, I certainly wouldn't say that it is impossible for a Mal to have blue eyes. That trait was likely present in the breed at some point and there is a possibility of it cropping up randomly again.

As for the gene that causes solid blue eyes ... we just don't know yet. There is no way to test a dog to see if it carries the mutation that causes blue eyes because we don't know what the causative gene or causative mutation is.

Hope that helped shed a little bit of light on the situation. Even if there are no real answers yet!! haha
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