GO!

adopting out a pit bull with a bite history

This is a special section for dogs needing new homes and for inspiring stories of dogs that have found their furever home through Dogster or through the love and energy of rescuers. This is also the place to discuss shelters, rescue organizations, rescue strategies, issues, solutions, etc. and how we can all help in this critical endeavor. Remember that we are all here for the love of dog! If you are posting about a dog that needs a new home, please put your location in the topic of your thread so those close by can find you! Make sure to check out Dogster's dog adoption center!

  
(Page 1 of 3: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  


Member Since
05/26/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat May 26, '12 3:57pm PST 
I need help Adopting out a 16 month old pit bull he is super friendly well behaved with a great temperament However a local teen trouble maker was teasing him across the boundary of the invisible fence untill he bit her in the hand and leg...It was completely provoked !! Animal control report states that the dog was provoked and is otherwise very friendly Now the teens mother is trying to sue the insurance company and trying to destroy the dog( animal control won't allow it) But the dog owners homeowners insurance is going to cancel the policy unless he gives the dog away...... We are finding it difficult to adopt this dog out.... IF THIS DOG DOESN'T GET ADOPTED THE OWNER WILL BE FORCED TO PUT HIM DOWN Please Help
[notify]
Twister

Love me.
 
 
Barked: Mon May 28, '12 10:54am PST 
Imo, the owner should have been more proactive in making sure the dog was all right by itself. Not very fair to leave a dog with no fence (for the humans), which means no protection from humans. Some dogs just do not do good with invisible fences. Right now, the best thing would be to look for rescues which could take the dog as the average dog owner will not be able to take the dog. It may have been a provoked attack, but what caught my eye is that the girl was bitten twice, not just a one-time warning nip/bite. She was attacked and bitten twice, that does not bode well for the dog. I love Pits, but if you truly love them you have to look at them with open eyes to get them the help they need. Right now this dog needs a Rescue that can spend time rehabbing the dog. What area is the dog in? You could start by looking up any rescues in the area, then expanding the search if they do not accept the dog. Good luck! hug
[notify]
Kodiak

The cheese ninja
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 7, '12 11:03am PST 
Twister, that's so true. People get reactive against the anti-pit propaganda, and then they deny problems in dogs which means they don't get the help they need. Then they go to inappropriate homes, hurt pits' reputation, and get put down. What they really need is honest assessments from unbiased people- not crazy anti-pit people, and not pit hoarders. It's tough, because shelters and rescues are so full of them that even the perfect ones often can't get adopted out.
[notify]

Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 7, '12 11:39am PST 
It would be helpful to know where this dog is located. A reputable pit rescue organization might be your best bet. The problem is, as other posters have mentioned, that it is difficult to adopt out healthy 16 month old pits with no bite history. There is just a huge glut of them in shelters across the country. Whatever you do, please fully disclose the dog's history, especially if a rescue is willing to take him on. It's not easy to find a rescue that's willing...I missed what your position is, are you currently working with/for a rescue that has taken this dog temporarily?

My best friend has four pit bulls. She was dropped by her homeowner's insurance after they did a drive-by, the dogs did absolutely nothing wrong they just didn't want to carry the risk. It took her awhile, but she was able to find another insurance company that wanted her business. This man might be able to find one, too. But it sounds like the dog is better off out of this neighborhood, all things considered.

Check out pit bull rescue central's site here (close any spaces) http://www.pbrc.net/breedinfo.html

They are a wealth of info on pit rescue, how to adopt out, how to find a good rescue org in your area, where to turn when options seem to be few etc. Best of luck to you in finding this dog a home.

Invisible fences are not a good option for this breed. People view and treat them differently than other dogs and they need to be kept safe from idiots like that girl.
[notify]


Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 7, '12 12:59pm PST 
First off, I'm sorry that you're in a position to where you have to help out a dog that has very little chance of being adopted. that must be very frustrating.

Secondly, while that girl was obviously acting ignorantly, it's really more the owner's fault, so he's the one you should really be angry at. Any responsible pitbull or dog owner in general will tell you that you NEVER leave your dog outside unattended for a period of time like that.

Dogs fall under the attractive nuisance catagory where I live, so if a kid gets bitten on your property, you're still at fault. No matter what kind of dog you have, it's really important to understand the laws in your town so that you can keep your pet as safe as possible.

I do not know what to tell you, OP. Adopting out ANY dog with a bite history puts the original owner at a risk. Especially if the dog gets into any trouble in the future new home.

In your shoes, I'd reach out to several places: a really reputable pitbull rescue and maybe the US breed club and just see what advice they can give you. They'll know better then anyone else how to handle this situation, because I doubt this is the first time this kind of thing has come up.
[notify]
Scooter

Work hard; Play- harder.
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 7, '12 4:50pm PST 
Honestly, that is not how a well bred/great temperamented APBT acts. Period. Most rescues are going to not be willing to take on that kind of liability and very few adopters would be willing to either, especially if they have experience with the breed.
[notify]
Twister

Love me.
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 7, '12 5:26pm PST 
That is what I thought too, Scooter. If it were towards dogs that would be one thing, but not towards humans. shrug
[notify]
Steele

The Guardian
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 8, '12 4:38am PST 
So lemme' get this straight... a dog is on his own property, not bothering anyone until some ignoramus comes and harasses the crap out of him 'til he bites the kid. But the owner of the dog is at fault? Really?! How about putting blame where it's deserved- on the kid and most importantly, the parent of the child. That dog could still well have been behind a secure fence and the child could have stuck her arm through it while teasing him. Actually, that's happened here and of course, the blame is placed on the dog....

I know who the dangerous ones are and here's a hint- The 4-legged one isn't one of them. I understand that the world doesn't see it this way, but boy what a backwards world we live in!

Sorry, /end rant. OP, I'm not sure what to tell you, but I feel for your situation and I just hope things can be worked out (and kudos to animal control for not labeling this victim "vicious" or "dangerous").

P.S.- My dogs are well behaved and would not bite either but come provoke them in their own yard over and over and I wouldn't be surprised if they strike you one and you'd damn well deserve it. ...Sick of these backwards laws.
[notify]


Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 8, '12 6:37am PST 
Yes, the owner of that dog is ABSOLUTELY at fault because leaving ANY DOG AT ALL unattended behind an electric fence, especially a bully breed, is incredibly irresponsible.

Electric fences are notoriously unreliable, especially with a breed of dog known to have a very high pain tolerance and a stubborn twist to their personality.

If that behavior is responsible to you, then we must have vastly different definitions of what being a good dog owner is, especially to a breed of dog who desperately needs MORE responsible owners rather then people trying to make excuses for bad behavior. This type of incident only makes the breed look bad, regardless of the fact that if the owner had just protected his dog there would have never been an issue.

In my mind, a responsible bully breed owner does EVERYTHING to research and advocate for their breed. They don't put them in bad situtations and hope for the best.
[notify]
Valentine

I has a happy.- It is for you.
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 8, '12 8:10am PST 
I agree with everybody laugh out loud The owner shares responsibility for the bite, even if it was provoked. Fair or not, pibbles and their owners must maintain a higher standard of training and supervision.

Invisible fences aren't a substitute for active supervision precisely because of these situations, and if the dog got nicked at the same time the girl was teasing him it might not be temperament at all - it could have been a response to the shock, not the girl. That wouldn't be surprising for any breed of dog.

Has the owner looked into other insurance options? Failing that, I recommend a good pit rescue.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 3: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3