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Too difficult and time consuming to rescue or adopt

This is a special section for dogs needing new homes and for inspiring stories of dogs that have found their furever home through Dogster or through the love and energy of rescuers. This is also the place to discuss shelters, rescue organizations, rescue strategies, issues, solutions, etc. and how we can all help in this critical endeavor. Remember that we are all here for the love of dog! If you are posting about a dog that needs a new home, please put your location in the topic of your thread so those close by can find you! Make sure to check out Dogster's dog adoption center!

  
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Twister

Love me.
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 8, '12 10:58am PST 
I was thinking the same thing, Lucille; that if they have young children the rescues may not want them to be around the dogs.thinking
It seems to me they are saying 'it would be easier to go to a byb' simply out of frustration.

I personally will probably get my next dog in a couple years either from a breeder, or adopt straight from a kill-shelter in OKC. Depends entirely on the breed we decide on. There are many rescues that most likely would not adopt out to me because I have not owned the breed of dog I am considering (ie, Siberian Husky, most-if not all-in a rescue do need experienced handlers to get over whatever upbringing they had), and because I will be moving overseas eventually (no more house-checks unless they wanna come visit wink ).

So I can see how difficult it may be because of something on the applications, or because of the desired breed not matching lifestyle/experience, or location of the rescues.

Hope you are able to find your next pup soon if you haven't yet.wishes

Eta: I am starting to see more eye-to-eye with rescues due a recent experience. We had fostered an adult dog (Mr. Bernie Wiggles, for those who may remember him) because the shelter had no room; and we adopted him out to my brother and sister-in-law. We should have been more careful. Family isn't always the best choice. confused They had been chaining him up since they did not have a fenced-in yard, and he broke free twice. This last time he was gone a week and a half before they found him (a nice girl was taking care of him as his tag had broken off). We have asked for his return, and my sister will have to drive up to MI (we are in MO) to get him back. So yeah, there's a reason why rescues are picky.

Edited by author Thu Mar 8, '12 11:08am PST

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Rolo

1236640
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 8, '12 11:23am PST 
I just adopted a dog I was fostering from a high-kill shelter in South Carolina through a rescue in New Jersey. I did not find the paperwork or the home visit onerous at all. The home visit was very easy. They called my vet and three friends for references. I thought this showed forethought and care for the dog. I was happy to wait the 2 months it took for them to arrange a transport which was very close to me, as it turned out. I am glad they cared so much for this wonderful dog.

And it is very nice that they provided the heartworm medicine for him, saving me the cost. smile Plus, I'm in love with him now. cloud 9
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Savannah- Blue Belle

A Heart of Gold!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 8, '12 12:00pm PST 
Rolo is quite a beauty! Congratulations!
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Nicky

World's Cutest- Leprechaun
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 8, '12 12:50pm PST 
Funny, I didn't have that experience either when I adopted Nicky from a northern IL all breed rescue. thinking The application was 2 pages long of basic questions, no home checks, no follow up visits/calls, just a reference check. We had a little email tag over a fenceless yard (Nicky was a bolter), but they were satisfied with my solutions. Most places do have their adoption requirements on their website and/or petfinder page.
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Harley

Go ahead...run.- I'll catch up
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 8, '12 3:06pm PST 
I have had some issues with rescues as well. I'm sure this is a "some, not all" type of thing. Oddly enough, I do live in Northern Illinois. The problem I have is that the ones I mention would not allow me to adopt/rescue because we dont have a fence. I certainly understand the reasons behind having a fence. But to deny a family on that basis alone is wrong. And yes - it was THAT alone. I am a stay at home mom. I walk my dogs, I physically take them out to potty and we go to the dog park. I dont need a fence. My dogs gets more than enough exercise. I do not use a tie out - which I dont have a problem with if its used properly anyway. I have on occasion used it out front when washing the car or playing with the kids so the dogs could run away and they were supervised.

To have a resuce group say I cant have a dog unless I get a fence is their prerogative. But my HOA says it has to be board on board cedar. I cant afford to pay $7000 for a fence. Doesnt mean I cant afford to raise my pets. In addition I know, personally, of 3 instances where a dog was left out in a fenced backyard and for one reason or another, died. One of these was my Harley's momma...she climbed up a snowdrift, got over the fence and got hit by a car. Some people have a false sense of security with their fences. They open a door, let the dog out and forget about it. A fence does not mean you are a better dog owner and for that to be the sole reason...is crazy.

Also - there is a shelter right near me that I used to support until I witnessed something unbelievable. A man (that I know from town)came in looking at pets. He had been there before years prior and taken a little yorkie. The yorkie had passed and was looking for another companion. There was a little peek-a-poo that had been there for almost a year because she was a senior dog (6...really?) and a prior medical condition had ruined her coat. She was perfectly healthy but not too pretty. This man didnt care. He filled out everything, they called his vet on the spot. He was preparing to leave and he made a comment about how she was going to love traveling the country. He was a owner/operator OTR driver. They IMMEDIATELY took the dog back and said this was no way for an animal to live and asked him not to return unless he retired. This dog has been in a cage with a concrete floor for months and yet a life with a man that was loving and caring was not good enough because he drove for a living. This man had pics of his yorkie on FB and all the places he visited. Her area in the truck was a castle! He stopped several times a day and all her needs were met. I just could not believe what I was seeing and hearing. They didnt even question what the peek-a-poos life would be like - they just said no. He left in tears...literally. Some shelters and resuce are far too strict. There is a Sheltie rescue I follow on FB that constantly has dogs available and I would have had one long ago had it not been for the fact I dont have a fence. And yet the constantly cry about not having enough adopters. Some things should be based on a case by case basis. Perhaps if they'd come to my home and see how I did things...I dont even get that because of the fence.

So although some shelters are lax in requirements, many many are not. And I think in my area those are more the norm than the exception. I think its completely appropriate for an organization to be thorough, but I think a lot of them are hurting their causes by being far too extreme.
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 8, '12 4:16pm PST 
No one that has ever actually adopted would ever make such a ridiculous claim.

I've fostered for kids adopted by families in WI. Just the ICPC paperwork alone made my head spin.

I'm sorry but that comment was so incredibly insulting to anyone that's ever put committed to the process of adopting domestically or internationally.

There is NOTHING easy about it, for ANYONE involved.


To address the issue of breed, I can see a rescue discriminating against a family that has young children but a family with adopted children just because of the dogs breed? Ludicrous.


If it's taking longer to adopt a dog than it did to adopt a child there are some major issues OP is probably very aware of and just doesn't want to address here.


Ugh. This post is just beyond offensive to anyone that deals with both kids and dogs waiting for forever families....
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Twister

Love me.
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 8, '12 8:01pm PST 
@Harley, I feel so bad for that man!! shock I've seen many truck drivers with dogs, and they look pretty happy.

@Trigger, I think this guy was mostly ranting (which most, if not all, of us do when frustrated, so i took it with a grain of salt-obviously you did not), and I am seeing and hearing of more and more people who are having issues trying to adopt from rescues. Yes, there may be a problem, but we do not know that, and I would not accuse him of having some major issue. I don't think this claim is insulting either. The public is being told again and again to rescue dogs instead of buying, so more and more of the public is. Then they get rejected by the people who tell them they should adopt. I think we are going to hear more people start talking about their experiences with shelters and rescues now they know they are not the only ones rejected for whatever reasons. What I find insulting is the insinuation that they have a major problem so they are not good enough for a dog, but they can adopt a child. If there was such a major problem, then they would not be allowed to adopt a child. But they have been deemed a good home for foster children...but not good enough for dogs? I love dogs, but as a teacher, that thought is extremely insulting to me. confused

Eta: this is the end of a hard and long day for me, so I'm apologizing in advance if I misread, misinterpreted, or come across wrong. Sorry! hug ...i should prob just delete this post now...thinking neh

Edited by author Thu Mar 8, '12 8:07pm PST

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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 9, '12 6:29am PST 
Twister, no one here said anything about a home being "good enough" to adopt a child into but not a dog. Where you got that implication is beyond me.

I think this was a thread intended to flame rescues with zero substance behind it. The fact that everyone KNOWS it takes most people YEARS to adopt a child and there are an infinite number of hoops to jump through...yet the claim is being made this person was cleared to adopt a child but can't to get a dog because it's harder....come on.

This wasn't a rant, it was an all out assault on both arenas.


It is (IMHO) just as offensive to dog rescues as it is to social services.
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Jewel, PCD

8.6lbs of fury- in a bow!
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 9, '12 8:39am PST 
The whole fence thing makes me giggle now that I have Jewel. When I was looking to buy a house I refused every house that that didn't have a fence. I ended up with a small house on a big lot, my backyard is so big that we run small dog agility in it even since I added a 10x20' garden. It's big for a small dog.

All Jewel does in the yard is sun tan on the deck. She'll pee if her friends are over and they're peeing in it but other wise she'll come in from the backyard and expect a walk. Yup, whole lot of good that fence does me. laugh out loud
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Savannah- Blue Belle

A Heart of Gold!
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 9, '12 9:18am PST 
Jewel, I built a fence for my previous Cocker Spaniel, Cotton.

She did just as Jewel does. I don't think her feet ever touched the grass, unless she was on a walk.
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