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Hypotheticaly could a Cane Corso make a good Therapy Dog?

The Service and Therapy Dog forum is for all service and therapy dogs regardless of whether or not their status is legally defined by federal or state law, how they are trained, or whether or not they are "certified." Posts questioning or disputing a person's need for a service or therapy dog, the validity of a person's service or therapy dog, or the dog's ability to do the work of a service or therapy dog are not permitted in this forum. Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times.

  
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Queen- Belladonna- PSDiT

I'm a Queen who- works like a- pesant
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 9, '14 5:00am PST 
I know that some breeds are less scarey looking and better suited for Therapy work but I was wondering if a Cane Corso would make a good Therapy dog. I dont own one and although I would love to have one I wouldnt know where to go to get one anyway. I have always wanted to do therapy work but the dog I had that I wanted to use as a Therapy Dog,my husky Maggie,was diagnosed with brain cancer and had seizures so she couldnt do the therapy work. I know that Cane Corsos were bred to be guard dogs but can they be taught to be gentle friendly loving dogs that might make a good therapy dog? I am only asking this hypothetically of course.
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Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 9, '14 2:30pm PST 
No, absolutely not.

Yes, there are Corsos in existence that love all people with exuberant abandon. Finding them is like finding a Lab without an oral fixation - with a much, much smaller pool to pick from.

The breed should be aloof but well-mannered with strangers, devoted to his owner and owner's family. Due to bad breeding, many Corsos are simply aggressive toward all strangers. But even the former is not suitable for therapy work. Therapy dogs must want to interact with people; to engage with them both physically and emotionally.
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Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 10, '14 9:55am PST 
In addition to what was said (very well) above, I don't think it's appropriate to have a dog who drools constantly as a therapy dog. Utmost care is taken to keep therapy dogs clean, and, well, drool is pretty gross.
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Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 11, '14 5:32pm PST 
Theoretically you could make the right Cane Corso into a therapy dog.. but the reality is that like many guarding breeds they are not well suited for therapy work. A therapy dog should Love attention, they should thrive on strange people touching them.

While almost all puppies are going to be sweet and like people usually when guarding breeds such as Cane Corso's reach maturity they are going to be more suspicious.

If your passion is Therapy work then find a breed who is going to share that passion with you. If your passion is the breed then find activities that the breed will enjoy doing and be passionate about. I recommend weight pull as a good place to start.

Don't ever go into a relationship seeking to change someone, dog or human included. I have a few friends who have tried Cane Corso's as service dogs and generally it doesn't work out well. They tend to do really well until they hit maturity, at which time their suspicious nature kicks in and they start to be defensive of their handler. This is not a safe thing for dog or handler.
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Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 12, '14 9:04am PST 
It's not necessary to have a dog as over-the-top as a Corso to intimidate people. Regularly walking any dog with as strong a protective drive as a Corso should have though a situation full of shady places and people can cause over the top aggression. If you find strangers highly suspicious to start with, and all you ever see is strangers doing bad things, it's not going to be long before you can't trust anyone at all. My suggestion there would be not to put either of you in danger (a dog is a poor match for a gun) and find a safer place to walk. Knowing someplace is dangerous and going in anyway is setting yourself up for trouble, regardless of preparation.

The really bad Corso breeders tend to be people who produce puppies from any tough-looking breed for ridiculous fees. A Pit Bull breeder selling Corsos is a HUGE red flag. Not only do they not care about health and standards, they tend to be looking for intimidating, aggressive dogs. There's a breeder around here putting out 200 lb Corsos and English Mastiffs with severe aggression problems, to a point where several I have known have grown up and turned on their owners. His only goal is that his dogs look and act tough. Stay far, far away from such breeders... They only bring heartbreak.

For now, like you mention, focus on your course work, then I'd look at moving to a safer area. Then, if you're in a position for a puppy, you could look around for reputable Corso breeders. Most of the well-bred Corsos I have met are directly from or have very recent Italian linage. As with any breeder, the reputable ones health test, have solid puppy contracts, and show and/or work their dogs.
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Queen- Belladonna- PSDiT

I'm a Queen who- works like a- pesant
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 12, '14 6:45pm PST 
We cant afford to move again. The place we moved to right about the time I started school we are buying and with the contract we are under basically if we move out before we pay the house off fully we have to pay the people we are buying it off of for the cost of clean up and anything that they have to do to fix anything that we should happen to damage.I am not sure about why this pit breeder has "goliath" the Cane pup but at least he realized that because he works a lot and his wife just had a baby not long ago he was not being fair to "goliath" by not having time to properly play with him or train him. His pits are fine looking dogs they dont look overly scary to me but then again I used to own pits myself. I will still have to make the time between eating,studying, cooking and cleaning house to work with my dogs. I know that when the time comes for me to add a cane to my family I will be looking for a blue brindle because I love the look of brindle dogs. The first pit bull I owned was a big red brindle then I had a reverse brindle and an apricot brindle. Garnet and Blaize are both brindles as well. But again I wouldnt know where to look for a GOOD cane breeder in or around Indiana. I have a feeling that when "goliath" comes home in two weeks I am gonna see a lot of him because his owner lives two doors down from us where the DA pit bull Face lives.
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Stormin'- Norman

1301892
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 13, '14 12:30pm PST 
As a woman, I've walked alone in both of the Hispanic/Latino towns I lived in. Mexican and Dominican, one on the east coast, one on the west coast. Shopped at their groceries for my tamarind, and eaten great tacos, pastries and horchata while learning a bit of conversational Espanol. Don't forget, they were in the Americas first wink

Your racism is showing, you might want to tuck it back in laugh out loud
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Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 13, '14 2:36pm PST 
Yeah, I gotta say I was wondering what was inherently dangerous about Mexicans, but I'm used to the old, old Dogster rules where such things are taken with the best intent and not discussed on the forums.

When I say "tough looking" dogs, I don't mean to you personally. There is a market for breeds that the general public perceives as scary, from Pits to anything big with cropped ears, to wolfy-looking. I don't find Pits as a whole scary either, but that's not the point. The better thing to look at is where his dogs fall in regard to breed standard. If he's breeding American Pit Bull Terriers, you should be able to compare to a standard. In any case, I would tread carefully if you are not ready to take on a pup yet and your friend seems flaky about this. You don't want to end up with more dogs than you can care for.
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Toto, CD,- RN, CGC

We don't- doodle!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 13, '14 3:46pm PST 
Norman...applauseapplauseapplause Some of my best friends are Foreign!!!

Edited by author Mon Jan 13, '14 7:20pm PST

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Beowulfs- Beauregard- CGC CGCA

What's too big- mean?
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 13, '14 9:43pm PST 
I love guardian breeds, but some are more aggressive than others. Finding a Cane with the right temperament to do therapy work would be like finding a natural alerting medical alert dog- pretty rare. Plus, the training and socialization you would have to do is pretty intensive. If you found the right temperament and put in the work you might have a good therapy dog, but then again you might have to wash it out at 2 when it matures and starts "guarding".
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