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Would this be considered a "real" service dog?

The Service and Therapy Dog forum is for all service and therapy dogs regardless of whether or not their status is legally defined by federal or state law, how they are trained, or whether or not they are "certified." Posts questioning or disputing a person's need for a service or therapy dog, the validity of a person's service or therapy dog, or the dog's ability to do the work of a service or therapy dog are not permitted in this forum. Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times.

  
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Ginger DSA- ThD TT CGC - &hearts

My Angel
 
 
Barked: Tue May 15, '12 9:02pm PST 
I was thinking about something the other day after a friend and I were talking about service dogs so I figured I'd ask on here. This is a hypothetical question, not about any actual situation that I know of.

So hypothetically-- first let's say someone qualified to have a service dog according to the law.
Let's say they had a pet dog that had fairly good obedience training already and they train the dog to do service dog tasks for them at home.

However they do not actually do public access training and they don't take the dog into offices, stores, or other indoor places where a pet dog is not allowed-- for example say they use a walker or wheelchair in these places instead, or they avoid going to those types of places altogether (such as due to anxiety or agoraphobia).

Would the dog be considered a service dog according to the law? If they do take the dog to some places where pet dogs are not allowed but which are not places a dog would need special training/exposure to (for example an outdoor event that does not allow pets, or a vacation rental) is their dog allowed as a service dog or should the dog not be allowed because they should not be considered a full service dog due to the lack of public access training?
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Jazmine- *Jazzy*

1230847
 
 
Barked: Tue May 15, '12 9:12pm PST 
According to the ADA, and I know if I get this wrong I will be corrected, yes that would be a real service dog. The law doesn't require public access testing/training for the US. There are other countries that do though. I believe the ADA is fairly relaxed as far as training and such except that a)the owner is disabled b)the dog is trained tasks specifically to mitigate that disability in public and c) the dog is not disruptive and is housebroken.

I know I will probably be corrected if this is wrong but to me yes that would be a real service dog. Probably a lot better than most of the fakers out there.
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Harley, SD,- CGC, TDI

Super Service- Boy!
 
 
Barked: Wed May 16, '12 7:47am PST 
Yes. The ADA does not require the service dog to go out into public places, and therefore, does not require public access training. It requires that IF a SD is to go out into public, they be properly behaved (which would require the public access training). The reason most of us online harp on public access training is that most people who come online looking for SD advice do so bc they want a public access SD.
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Sage

Wiggle waggle
 
 
Barked: Wed May 16, '12 4:55pm PST 
Public access training will also prove the dog was properly trained if any legalities arrise in their years of service.
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Scooter

Work hard; Play- harder.
 
 
Barked: Wed May 16, '12 5:19pm PST 
There are Skilled Home Companions. That's the term that some programs use for SDs that are only used in the home; the term was widely used several years back by some of the programs selling dogs to families with kids who didn't need the dog at school. It should be noted that those program dogs did have some PAT work since it was expected that they would go with the family on vacations.
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Member Since
05/16/2012
 
 
Barked: Wed May 16, '12 5:28pm PST 
It depends on occasions I think. There are different laws for the different countries. In Europe there are differences between national and international registred dog. And alaso diferences in train and use. But according an international ADEu rules, there is possible, that your dog will be recognized as an assistance dog after re-traing in a suitable membership organisation.
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Aidan, CGC

1196863
 
 
Barked: Wed May 16, '12 6:51pm PST 
This is basically the situation I am in with Aidan. He works for me at home and work, that's pretty much it. Since the laws for housing and employment are different from the ADA, they aren't necessarily linked to being public access trained. Aidan has some public access training, enough that I feel comfortable taking him with me to the quiet pharmacy down the street, but I would not take him to the mall or the grocery store where it is considerably a more stressful environment.
This is a temporary situation for the next year or so while I'm on a waitlist for a program dog, since I would like to be able to go more places and it is very difficult to do that right now. Obviously when I made the decision to essentially "wash" Aidan from public access, it didn't make sense to wash him from working at the office, where he is near perfect, and go without a dog for 2 years while I wait for the program! Aidan's task training and public access work has been documented in the event that I would need it for some kind of emergency access or future employment/housing situations!
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Harley, SD,- CGC, TDI

Super Service- Boy!
 
 
Barked: Thu May 17, '12 9:59am PST 
I want to carify on what Scooter is saying (and I think this is what she means). Skilled home companion is a term made up by the service dog world to differentiate between service dogs trained for public access and those trained only for home use. No law, anywhere, acknowledged, uses, or even mentions "skilled home companion," and legally, they are service dogs. But, wanting to clarify the difference in training, someone in the service dog world made up that term and it caught on.
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Scooter

Work hard; Play- harder.
 
 
Barked: Thu May 17, '12 10:10am PST 
Yep, that was what I meant, Harley. Also, since programs involve contracts, they can/will spell out if the dog is meant to be used in public.

While it may not be a federally used term, it does well to define the differences between an ESA and a stay-at-home SD. Also, that is how Helping Hands defines their monkeys.
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Member Since
02/25/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 6, '12 8:29pm PST 
I know this is old but just going through threads here and thought this was interesting. I know of programs that train dogs for home use and they specify the dog is for home use NOT to be taken in public. If dog has no public training it should not be taken in public. I've read of people who train their own pets and use them at home as helpers or whatever too. At home should be at home not in public. They don't belong in public if not trained for it. I know a man who has a little dog he says is his at home service dog but he brings it on vacation with him (went on a cruise and has stayed at hotels with it). Wrong. Dog isn't public trained. Keep it home.
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