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New person-best breeds for south/hot service dog work

The Service and Therapy Dog forum is for all service and therapy dogs regardless of whether or not their status is legally defined by federal or state law, how they are trained, or whether or not they are "certified." Posts questioning or disputing a person's need for a service or therapy dog, the validity of a person's service or therapy dog, or the dog's ability to do the work of a service or therapy dog are not permitted in this forum. Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times.

  
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Member Since
12/31/2011
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 31, '11 7:10pm PST 
Hi, I've seen a lot of forums on here and decided to join finally. I'm trying to find a psychiatric service dog and had a rather dismal first trial adoption. It was a Saint Bernard, which triggered my disability with her particular snoring to the point I was so anxious she picked up on it and licked her legs so bad it began to bleed. Which at that point I gave her to the rescue I was doing the trial with especially since I wasn't getting any sleep and was in a constant state of worry. I really need a dog to help me sleep. So now I feel horrible because I gave up on her early, before the week was up. And wondering how a Saint Bernard would be able to hike/backpack in New Mexico in the first place given she was hot just riding in the car in the middle of winter. PS our weather is hot (highs 70-100 degrees) for 6 months out of the year and the other 6 we usually have temps in the 35-60 range, rarely do we have highs below this.
I need a dog to help interrupt a lot of anxiety stuff that won't be overly adversely affected, that can be trained to do grounding/deep pressure techniques, and could search a room for me. And I'm a active person but no super active border collies for me. Does anyone have any suggestions for breeds? Or whether I'm an awful person for turning this dog down?
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Jolanda

I grin from ears- to chin :D

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 31, '11 7:30pm PST 
Australian Cattle Dogs are good for working in the heat and cold. Also they are pretty mellow at home and active, as in doing whatever you are doing, outside.
They are usually grounded dogs and don't get stressed out over things. They keep their cool.
I find them very soothing at night, because they seem at ease and safe.
They like their home and their people. They are not super cuddly, but like to be close.
In general they are pretty grounded dogs.
I have friends in NM and one of them has many dogs, they all do well. Jojo was in NM with us during summer and liked it..

Heat... mh. I will give it a thought.. Best to you, sonja and the girls
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 31, '11 7:54pm PST 
Rhodesian Ridgeback, you'd have to look pretty close for breeders, but they are a nice large breed dog that does well in the heat, even the heat of the south. They are Usually steady dogs. I would say as a rule that a rescue would be more in tune with you which is not always a good thing. They tend (not always) to react more than a dog that is raised and hasn't had anything unsettling happen (re-homing in a rescue situation is Stressful on a dog).

Doberman's also tend to do well in hot environments, though I've heard some unsettling things about their lifespan/health which is why I scratched them off My list as a next dog.
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John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 2:10am PST 
If you don't mind the grooming upkeep poodles are very people oriented dogs and I know of several people who have them as PSDs.
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Member Since
12/31/2011
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 9:53am PST 
Thank you for all your responses. I never thought to look into rhodesian ridgebacks or cattle dogs. Are rhodesians prone to aggression and a more dominate breed?

Thank you for not beating me over the head for giving up the Saint!
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Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 2:44pm PST 
Goodness no, you have to do what is best for you, and the dog. And keeping would not have helped either of you.

Rhodesian's are a mixed bag of dogs. I've seen a number of them go on to make good service dogs. A good breeder or a rescue who is with you for the long hall would be key. They tend to be aloof but tolerant, I had on years ago who was abnormally social, and not aggressive but defiantly not a dog that would back down from a fight. By that I don't mean he went looking for them, or even started fights.
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Link

Hero of Hyrule
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 3:18pm PST 
I know a few people with RRs, and in fact a close friend of mine (who has experience with them) suggested them as a breed for me. Depending on the lines of course, my impression is that they are generally a pretty laid back calm breed. That was in fact why they were recommended for me... This is also coming from a border collie person, so my idea of laid back may be different from someone who is used to "lazy" breeds, lol.
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Zoe

"Those who are- loved are never- lost"
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 4:49pm PST 
Zoe has australian cattle dog in her and she has a rock solid temperament. When the vest goes on she goes into working mode and is happy to be doing her job. smile
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Torie

If you can roll- in the dirt, do- it!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 5:02pm PST 
I live in Albuquerque. Basically you want a dog with not a really heavy coat. I think not being black would be helpful as well. I would definitely not recommend a Saint. I don't think that RRs being hounds are the best. The local organization here uses a lot of labs and poodles. Aussies can be fairly high strung but they do well here as working dogs.

--des
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Ginger DSA- ThD TT CGC - &hearts

My Angel
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 7:01pm PST 
Do you need a particular size? I think a number of the medium-to-small breeds would fit well?
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