GO!

Can a husky be trained as a PSD?

The Service and Therapy Dog forum is for all service and therapy dogs regardless of whether or not their status is legally defined by federal or state law, how they are trained, or whether or not they are "certified." Posts questioning or disputing a person's need for a service or therapy dog, the validity of a person's service or therapy dog, or the dog's ability to do the work of a service or therapy dog are not permitted in this forum. Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times.

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  
Shasta

flight risk!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 15, '10 8:18pm PST 
I'm not talking about my husky now. She's way to old (12) but I noticed some interesting things about her today.

I took her to petsmart to get some hip and joint treats. whenever someone came near me, she'd put herself between me and that person. She didn't once pull on her leash (big deal for her!!) When we were walking up to the door, another customer was also walking toward the door. Shasta stopped, let the lady go by, then went ahead. ALSO when we were about to step off the curb into the parking lot she stood in front of me and kinda leaned on my legs so I wouldn't go. This car came whipping out of nowhere from an aisle and I never would have seen it until it was to late.
Now I know huskies are very hard to train. They're very independent dogs. Shasta is a flight risk where if she gets out, it'll take HOURS to get her back in the house.

The last year in my life has been unusually stressful. She follows me everywhere in the house. Never used to do that. I'll come downstairs and she'll follow and lay right behind my computer chair. I use the restroom and she lays right outside the door until I come out. She lays on the kitchen floor while I clean. If I close my bedroom door, she'll push on it until I open it. Are these good things or just my dog being clingy? She could never be a service dog as she gets excited to easy. But I kept her on a very short leash at the petstore and she didn't pull me once. I praised her and gave her a small treat in the car.

Sometimes out of no where when I'm sitting on my chair and my thoughts start to wander, all of a sudden she's there with her head on my lap. Kinda snaps me back into reality.

Like I said this is kinda new. Within the last year or so. She's never been very affectionate. I mean she loves to play, but she's not a cuddle dog by any means.

Would it be possible to train another husk as a PSD? Any input would be appreciated
Thanks for reading this far!
[notify]
Odin - SD

I've never met a- cheese I didn't- like.
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 15, '10 8:26pm PST 
Technically any breed of dog can be a SD. That said, some breeds you are more likely to have better success with. I don't have the link handy atm, but psychdog.org has a page on choosing a dog, I think you can prolly get to it from the FAQ.
[notify]
Lylah

The harder I wag- the more friends- I have
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 15, '10 8:37pm PST 
Yes, the selecting the dog portion is in the FAQ.

http://www.psychdog.org/faq.html#kind

I don't know how to do links. I suck. confused

There's a lot of breeds that could be harder to train. I steered away from the husky, for the reasons you listed as potential problems. I can't tell you how many times I thought about renaming my husky "Houdini".
[notify]

Shasta

flight risk!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 15, '10 8:43pm PST 
OMG we call Shasta Houdini all the time. She would squeeze out of the smallest holes in the fence. I swear that dogs bones collapse like a mouse. She could get out a hole the size of a softball. Little brat! But I love her. *sigh* just wish they weren't so independent!
[notify]
Lylah

The harder I wag- the more friends- I have
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 15, '10 8:51pm PST 
...collapsing bones...it all makes sense now. I had tried and tried to figure out WHERE the dog got out. The largest hole we found was, as you said, softball sized. Thank you for finally solving the mystery! big laugh

On a serious note, maybe you should write down all the things you love about the husky breed, and see what other breeds have the characteristics you adore. From there, maybe you can find an easier breed to train. Or if you decide you're up for a big challenge and get a husky, have this one's bones examined for mousy collapsing bones. big grin
[notify]
Ollivander

Super Silver- Service Spoodle
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 15, '10 10:30pm PST 
The link is actually here (the FAQ only has a small section on choosing a dog):

http://www.psychdog.org/lifestyle_ChoosingDog.html

While any breed of dog can technically be a service dog, some breeds tend to be better suited than others. Huskies are bred to run all day long, they have a lot of energy and are very smart and independant. These traits tend to not work well for what most people want in a service dog . Of course I am sure there are some wonderful Husky SDs out there, but generally speaking it is not a breed that tends to be recommended for service work.
[notify]
Figaro SDIT

Can't read my,- can't read my- poodle face
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 16, '10 12:49pm PST 
What about a Samoyed? I know I'm seen a few as SD and IME they are an easier dog. I'd love to own another one as a pet some day.
[notify]
Kaylee

Wag more, bark- less!
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 16, '10 1:11pm PST 
Of the most common northern breeds, Samoyeds probably have the highest tolerence for repitition. They're a herding breed in addition to a draft breed, and that pays off in their ability to listen and take direction from a handler compared to Sibes and Mals, who are more independent. If I HAD to choose a sled dog breed though, I'd look for a well-bred Chinook.

There are a lot of 'northern looking' breeds that are not as closely related to the draft dogs that are also worth looking into. The dogs of the continental Spitz family (Keeshond, AED, German Spitz) are a lot more handler oriented (although we have no grossespitz here in the US, only mittels, so most are smallish.) Lapphunds MIGHT suit but I've only met one and don't know he's typical (he's very sweet, very attentive to his owner, but honestly has little to no drive). There are apparently a number of Eurasiers working as service dogs, though, and even a few chows!

It's not that huskies (or malamutes, or fill in your breed of choice here) CAN'T do it, but that a dog who excells at and enjoys SD training and is trainable by an average owner trainer is going to be a very unusual member of that breed. OT is difficult enough without putting those kind of odds on it in addition to everything else. If 4/10 labs are suitable for SD work (number pulled out of thin air) and 1/20 huskies, it makes more sense to look for one of the 4 rather than that one in 20.
[notify]
Figaro SDIT

Can't read my,- can't read my- poodle face
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 16, '10 2:11pm PST 
Kaylee, I only mentioned Sammy's because they are the only breed of that type I feel qualified to comment on. Thank you for fleshing out my answer. smile
[notify]
OnQ's- Althea

I can do that
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 16, '10 6:20pm PST 
We have a few PSD family members
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2