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Service dog on the plane

The Service and Therapy Dog forum is for all service and therapy dogs regardless of whether or not their status is legally defined by federal or state law, how they are trained, or whether or not they are "certified." Posts questioning or disputing a person's need for a service or therapy dog, the validity of a person's service or therapy dog, or the dog's ability to do the work of a service or therapy dog are not permitted in this forum. Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times.

  
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Harley, SD,- CGC, TDI

Super Service- Boy!
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 7:30am PST 
I flew home for my brother's wedding Friday, and there was a service dog on the plane with the lady sitting in front of me. I was talking with her once we had landed. The pup was beautiful golden and a seizure alert dog. The only thing was that she had sedated him so much that she was having trouble getting him up to get off the plane. Are you suppose to sedate a service dog when flying? Doesn't that keep them from doing their job?
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Member Since
12/31/1969
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 9:23am PST 
That would set off bells in my head. SD are trained to accompany their owner anywhere and everywhere so if she had to sedate the dog, it means that dog was a pet and not a SD. Being sedated, the dog would have been of no use to her had she needed it.
Easy to see the dog was a bundle of nerves and not trained at all, mabe even trying to camouflage some aggressiveness.....fakes will go to any extremes to bring their pet with them.
Too bad you didn't think of asking her why her dog was so heavily sedated.
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Sabrina- 2000~2012

To break- injustice we- must break- silence
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 10:06am PST 
Personally I wouldn't sedate Sabrina on a plane-- it's really not all that different from riding on a bus or train. A little louder at first, but then when you're in the air it's actually pretty calm. Plus dogs ears don't have problems like human ears do so it's just noise and vibration. And yes, being sedated would make it hard for them to do their jobs. But I hate to jump to conclusions about people-- it is possible that the handler asked her vet about how to prepare her SD for flying (I know I did the first time I flew!) and the vet gave the person sedatives not understanding that the dog would be flying in the cabin?
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Scooter

Work hard; Play- harder.
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 10:43am PST 
Scooter and I fly quite frequently and I would NEVER sedate him. He naps, but still keeps an eye on me. Like Sabrina said, it isn't much different than riding on any other public transport.

Sabrina, most vets wouldn't give sedation for a dog flying cargo due to the risk of breathing problems. I asked about it when I was sending a bulldog cargo to be bred (He said he'd have been more adamant about it if she was what he considered a short nose).
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Sabrina- 2000~2012

To break- injustice we- must break- silence
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 10:57am PST 
Ah, good to know! When we were considering flying our cats across the country instead of driving, the vets wanted to give us sedatives for the kitties, so I just assumed they'd do the same for dogs! (we ended up driving across the country and using no sedatives, though)
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Scooter

Work hard; Play- harder.
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 11:07am PST 
I think they look at cats slightly different. Scooter and I have been present on planes with cats as carry-on, and sedation for them would have been nice. They wouldn't shut up. We've also been on planes with yappy little dogs.

Never fails that no one notices Scooter until we land, then it is all, "He's soo quiet, I didn't even know he was there. I wish my dog would behave like that." or my favorite "He's better behaved than most of the kids on this flight." (Though I have to admit, I have to tell him it is ok if we hear a crying kid. He's been taught to alert to that for when/if we have one.)
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Otto - Registered- Service Dog

ADI cert. - the only one- that matters!
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 2:09pm PST 
FYI, any animal can be denied access to the cabin when flying. It's a call that can be made at the time of boarding.

I flew across country with a Siamese cat. No sedation and no noise.

As for the dog in question:
We don't know the history of the dog or the handler. Therefore, none of us can make any comments that are based on fact.

I suggest we leave it there.
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Byron

Small dogs can- have BIG jobs!
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 9:00pm PST 
I agree with Otto that since we know little about the history of the pair, it is impossible to give a valid recommendation. While it is usually not advisable to sedate your partner when he is being required to work, I can imagine that there could be some obscure potential possibilities in which it may be advisable.

As for sedation of pets on airplanes, some vets do recommend sedating both dogs and cats for the flight (especially with Benedryl for in-cabin flights). It doesn't make it right, but they do anyway. wink
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Nolte (Retired Guide Dog)

Guide dog work- is a joyous- thing!
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 9:10pm PST 
I know a few guide dog handlers whose guides get a little nervous on flights, so their vets recommended benadryl. I've never had to use it on my guide dogs, but have for one of my pet Dachshunds on a flight.

I agree with Otto's mom.... not knowing the situation it's not fair to assume that the Golden was not a legit SD.

Karen Ann & Kanine Krew
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OnQ's Hachet Man Scoobyovich

Look at Me
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 18, '07 10:16pm PST 
I just went home with my new owner on a plane (Delta). I think if it was the first time, having them on hand would be nice. Only in an emergency should they be used... Like say .... getting air sick.
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