GO!

New to raw diet and a few questions - would appreciate any advice!!!

This is a dedicated place for all of your questions and answers about Raw Diets. There are also some really cool groups like "Raw Fed" on the topic you can join. This forum is for people who already know they like the raw diet or sincerely want to learn more. Please remember that you are receiving advice from peers and not professionals. If you have specific health-related questions about your dog's diet, please contact your vet!

  


Member Since
10/11/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 11, '12 3:28am PST 
(Hello - I'm Helen, 24 and I'm new! I just typed all this out and the page refreshed - I may have clicked something - and I couldn't see if it had posted so I'm re-posting. If it has posted and this is a duplicate I'm really sorry!)

Our working breed cocker is 11 months. He's always been funny with his food. He's on a dry food diet att eh minute, he came to use on royal canin so we continued this but he would never eat it all and was very picky. I transitioned him over to Arden Grange lam kibble but still he was being picky.

He's a very slender dog and I know he is still growing but even so he's very slender. (ps yes he has been wormed! Regularly!)

Recently a friend gave us some dog pouches they weren't using and he loved them but I would only let him have them with his kibble. He'd nose his kibble outof the bowl and eat the pouch. Thr only thing is I was not pleased with the pouch 'contents'.

After talking to a fellow cocker spaniel owner she mentioned she has their dog on the raw meat diet and have never looked back after 5 years.

Now, even for a cocker, Jasper is very small. He still looks as though he is 4/5 months old (he was the runt of his litter poor mite). He's averaging at 6.5-7k in weight.

I've read the smaller the dog - the more danger for the bones. Is this true? Does anyone else have a small-ish dog that feed raw bones - is it really an issue.

I have ordered his first stack of food from a 'Nuturing for Nature' company, he has 10 minced chicken meals, some sprat fish meals (are their bones okay too?), a couple of chicken and tripe meals, some marrow bones for treats and a lamb ribs as a treat.

My thinking was to stay safe with chicken for now with the occasional raw meat treats just whilst he's transitioned over from kibble to raw - is this the right thing to do?

What is like the staple raw meat diet food that most dogs would eat more of? We're also going to add vegs here and there as Jasper loves his vegs smile

I am still doing loads of research into this and not afraid to admit we're raw meat diet newbs! So any (and all!) advice is greatly appreciated. It's just so many sites seem to differ in their own opinions, one site I find to read on slates it saying about all these dangers then another site says how briliant it is. I'm in no doubt it is the best to feed a dog but I'm just worried about him chewing bones etc. I know it's a natural thing they do but you know, you can't help worrying sometimes! Is it as dangerous as I'm reading up on or is it okay (ie supervised eating).

I should also note I'm fully aware we should never cook the bones as we know they can splinter.
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Jasper

"Where's- Snowy??"
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 11, '12 5:53am PST 
I might also ask how on earth I can change my avatar picture to that of my dog Jasper... I've looked all over and can't seem to navigate to the right place cry
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Jasper

"Where's- Snowy??"
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 11, '12 5:54am PST 
Oh - I did it!

Yay!

The original question was asked by me before I added Jasper to my profile red face

How embarrassing!
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Kolbe

Where can I run- today?
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 11, '12 8:03am PST 
Hello.


I've read the smaller the dog - the more danger for the bones. Is this true? Does anyone else have a small-ish dog that feed raw bones - is it really an issue.

No, not really, you just need to feed appropriately sized bones for the size of the dog. There are plenty of chihuahuas, pugs, etc. on raw diets.


I have ordered his first stack of food from a 'Nuturing for Nature' company, he has 10 minced chicken meals, some sprat fish meals (are their bones okay too?), a couple of chicken and tripe meals, some marrow bones for treats and a lamb ribs as a treat.

This is very interesting. You can also just DIY if you feel comfortable -- I do not know what the cost involved in Nurturing for Nature is but many people just build their dogs' raw diets themselves with meat from the grocery.

My thinking was to stay safe with chicken for now with the occasional raw meat treats just whilst he's transitioned over from kibble to raw - is this the right thing to do?

If you're planning to do 100% raw at some point in time, the best thing to do is just go cold turkey right now. You don't need to transition. Your dog may need a few days to have some digestive adjustments, but many dogs don't at all.

What is like the staple raw meat diet food that most dogs would eat more of? We're also going to add vegs here and there as Jasper loves his vegs.

I don't know about a "staple" so much as just getting the proper balance of nutrients -- generally with prey model raw (that is, a raw diet that tries to imitate the contents of a prey animal), 80% meat, 10% bone, and 10% organ, with 5% of that organ being liver. Of course I don't mean to say you should be doing this ratio every day, sort of a balance over time thing, like over the course of a week. If you are including vegetables, a vegetable mash/slurry is more preferable in order to help the dog digest it.

[ETA] Actually on second thought, if there were something I'd advise getting as much in as possible into a raw diet -- red meat (after an initial stage of just chicken while introducing). Red meat is important, an all-chicken diet may run into deficiencies. Red meat such as lamb, beef, pork. Many raw feeders use chicken as their primary because it's the most affordable and then try to squeeze in as much red meat on top of that as they can. Red meat organs (liver, kidney, spleen etc) are good too, as well as the "richer" red meat muscle meats like heart.

I am still doing loads of research into this and not afraid to admit we're raw meat diet newbs! So any (and all!) advice is greatly appreciated. It's just so many sites seem to differ in their own opinions, one site I find to read on slates it saying about all these dangers then another site says how briliant it is.

Just use your gut and your noggin. Of course when fed improperly (not balanced, inappropriate bones, etc) there can be problems, just like there can be problems with us humans if we don't eat right. But I don't think that's a reason to not feed raw. There are a few starter threads on this forum that may help you, I will try to bump them for you.

I'm in no doubt it is the best to feed a dog but I'm just worried about him chewing bones etc. I know it's a natural thing they do but you know, you can't help worrying sometimes! Is it as dangerous as I'm reading up on or is it okay (ie supervised eating).

You will probably be very surprised at how your dog just innately knows what to do. It's totally normal to be a little apprehensive -- it's been pounded into our brains for years about bones and kibble is the end-all be-all, so on and so forth, and of course we don't want to do anything that might hurt our pet who we love and depends on us. Take it slow, at your pace. Start with something easy, like a chicken quarter (leg/thigh together). I think you'll be impressed with how easily the raw chicken bone, well padded with meat, crunches like nothing and goes down.

I should also note I'm fully aware we should never cook the bones as we know they can splinter.

This is correct. Also no bare bones -- bones should be padded with gobs and gobs of meat.

With reading (and doing) you'll start learning some ins and outs, and remember there is no rigid exact number -- that 80/10/10 is a guideline, for example -- you might find your dogs does better with vegetables, without vegetables, a little less bone, a little more bone, etc. After doing it for a bit it becomes second nature and not much more time consuming than throwing down the kibble -- it's just the initial reading, research and figuring out what works for your dog that takes a little fenangling.

I'm sure ANY specific questions you might have as you go can be answered here.

Edited by author Thu Oct 11, '12 8:07am PST

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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 11, '12 8:26am PST 
In addition to all the fantastic advice Kolbe gave you, I'd recommend reading through Chance's Beginner's Guide To Prey Model Raw PDF. As you've discovered, there are a lot of different sites with a lot of conflicting information. That guide is, in my opinion, the best and most accurate source of information on prey model raw that I've seen.
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Brody

Tiny boy, but he- has a huge- heart!
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 11, '12 11:27am PST 
Great advice given above. I just want to reasure you that small and even tiny dogs can do great on a raw prey model diet. Without minces if you prefer! Brody is 5 pounds and has been raw fed for almost 4 years. He eats beef, pork, bison, elk, venison, chicken, rabbit, etc.

He can easily eat chicken necks, backs, ribs, wings (we skip the leg bones, but he can eat the cartilage at the ends), rib bones and neck bones from pork, and the ends of beef bones. He can eat ALL of a rabbit, quail, and cornish hen. (If you are in the UK, those are called poisson? It's a young chicken).

I don't give any turkey bones as they seem very hard and dense. No weight bearing bones of large animals like marrow bones.

Bone is only 10% of the diet. Nothing to stress over. Don't let a fear of bones keep you from trying a raw diet! smile
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Miso

like the gravy!
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 12, '12 2:27pm PST 
We're new to raw and doing prepared from "red dog, blue kat" which is local to us. I'm not comfortable with buying meat that's not ethically sourced and with a small dog this is affordable for me.

I chose them because they include juiced veggies, bone and organs. It helps me keep it balanced. I use dehydrated liver, heart and salmon skins for treats. I've just started adding a raw chicken neck twice a week. Some of their portyeins also have a "with tripe" option.

I was also told a good rule of thumb is to feed the same protein for six weeks, and in the sixth week transition to a new one, with 3 red meat cycles for every two non-red meat ones.
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