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Question!!

Got a new, young, furry love in your life? This is the place for you to ask all of your questions-big or small! Just remember that you are receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a vet or behaviorist! Most important is to remember to have fun with your new fur baby.

  
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Adalynn Bell

Jump! Jump!- Jump!
 
 
Barked: Wed May 30, '12 4:28pm PST 
So, we got Addy to help Spyke with his aging and separation issues. It worked wonders. Now we are on the verge of losing Spyke to old age, and I worry for Addy. She desperately wants to play with him and cuddle him but he's not in the mood. My biggest concern is, now that she's used to a two dog home, after Spyke passes, should we get another puppy to not have her be alone? She's a great dog and loved to wrestle and play with Spyke when he was able to. Now I'm just worried how she's going to handle his passing...
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Wed May 30, '12 5:05pm PST 
I'm personally of the opinion that raising two puppies at once isn't beneficial to anyone involved. Aside from being a huge amount of work, puppies raised together will often bond very strongly to each other and subsequently bond less strongly to their human(s). Here are a few articles that explain it more thoroughly:
Double Trouble …. Raising Two Puppies At Once!
Sibling Dogs: The Worst Of Both Worlds
Raising Two Pups at the Same Time: Why it's a Bad Idea
Raising 2 Puppies at the Same Time

Ultimately the decision is up to you and what you think you can handle but if you're spending adaquate time with Adalynn, she won't need another dog in the house to be happy.
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Pirogue

Chew on- everything in- sight.
 
 
Barked: Wed May 30, '12 6:16pm PST 
Onyx is right it is up to you. Let me just tell you raising more than one puppy is hard work but it is doable. I have two pups that are a week apart in age. They are 7 months old now and I have no problems with any bonding. They play great with each other but they also love me very much. The bigger dog is even protective of me and my little dog always wants to be in my lap. I am certainly not telling you what to do but I know that a lot of people on here are going to tell you to absolutely not get another puppy because of bonding issues and the work, so I just wanted you to hear the other side and that it can work out.
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Adalynn Bell

Jump! Jump!- Jump!
 
 
Barked: Wed May 30, '12 8:12pm PST 
I wasn't thinking it would be a puppy necessarily. Even an older dog is fine with me. I just want to make sure she doesn't get lonely...I suppose it's something I'll have to watch and see how she does. wink
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Frankie

Cheese? PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Thu May 31, '12 5:54pm PST 
I agree, as long as you are around to spend quality time with Adalynn, she should be fine..But I also understand your concrn because Frankie came to me from a very busy house with LOTS of small-breed dogs, his own littermates, and his momma..He stayed with them until almost 10 weeks, and at times I cannot help but wonder if he really misses those little guys and gals..cry

BUT, we do make things as fun as possible for him.
And yet we try not to 'smother' or baby him, bc we want him to be independant..

I guess you will just have to wait and see..
It is up to you if you feel like Adalynn would need another doggie friend.
Most small breeds, and dogs in general, do well as long as their 'people' are around, tho. wink

Just wanted to add--your dogs are so sweet looking!! flowers
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Dingo

Leader of the- Dog Gestapo
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 2, '12 8:21pm PST 
Dogs do grieve, and it's natural. She might be depressed for a while, but I think she'll be fine. After an adjustment period, I don't see any problems with getting another dog at all - there are many dogs who need good homes to save them from a death sentence, and if you have the means to provide one I think it's a great idea.

As for puppies being raised together... We got Yoopie as a spur of the moment thing, and then got Dingo to keep him company in our big empty house while we were at our jobs (we work the same hours at the same place). This was before I'd ever heard about the whole 'puppies bonding' idea or that it was thought to be a bad thing. Funnily enough, I'd hoped they'd bond because they were only a month apart in age and we'd got them so young. Not such luck; Dingo and Yoopie were like oil and water. They never bonded and in fact Dingo was so bossy and forward that we had to take measures to separate them for a while which really defeated the whole purpose thinking

Every puppy pair is different and not all of them will bond. As with many other dog situations, it is a case-by-case issue. I personally believe the idea originated in the same school of thought that says you should beat your dog for not responding to a command.
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 2, '12 8:39pm PST 
It's true puppies raised together won't always bond, obviously it depends on the individual dogs involved, their ages when brought together, ect. ect. but it's difficult to know if that will be the case beforehand. Also true that for some people, having strongly bonded dogs isn't a bad thing, or is even considered a good thing. Personally, it's not something I want to see in my dog, and I would avoid raising two puppies together if I could at all help it, but that's just my feelings on the matter.

I personally believe the idea originated in the same school of thought that says you should beat your dog for not responding to a command.

I'm not quite sure how you make that connection, but I'm going to assume you didn't mean that comment as insultingly as it came across. For the record, I don't beat my dog wink

Edited by author Sat Jun 2, '12 8:54pm PST

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Dingo

Leader of the- Dog Gestapo
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 2, '12 10:10pm PST 
I'm not quite sure how you make that connection, but I'm going to assume you didn't mean that comment as insultingly as it came across. For the record, I don't beat my dog

No, no offense meant at all and I'm sorry if it sounded that way. I typed before thought and probably should have explained. I didn't follow your links (and I probably should have) but not long ago I did some reading on the thought that a puppy turning "doggy" - bonding with other dogs over humans - was an undesirable thing and excluded or diminished the bond the dog would have with a human. It seemed that in many cases this was stressed highly in training styles that also supported physically punishing the dog and other archaic training ideas. I don't think I've come across it in any progressive, positive reinforcement styles, but I am always willing to collect new knowledge and learn.

That is not to say that everyone who believes it trains with the same ideas - definitely not. Just that it seems to have a lot of weight in training styles I find distasteful. But I also raise pets, not working dogs and my dogs live a fairly soft life with what a lot of people would consider basic obedience. Perhaps it makes a difference in demanding and difficult situations, but in my personal experience I don't think it would be a major concern to the average pet owner.

Now, I will tell you it matters in cats - cats raised in groups will retain more kitten-ish mannerisms than those raised as singles.

Alright, now that I've hijacked this thread, I'll give it back big grin
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 2, '12 10:26pm PST 
None taken smile I do understand what you're saying now, and it's entirely possible that the idea is more prevalent in circles where trainers are heavy handed with corrections. I do know trainers who are positive reinforcement based who subscribe to the idea though so they are out there.

I can definitely agree that the importance of keeping a dog from becoming "doggy" depends on your plans for the dog. I want my dog highly focused and in tune with me for the activities we participate in. The bf and I don't live together but our dogs are four months apart in age and saw/see each other often. We can't take them to the same obedience class now because Onyx wants to be watching his dog all the time and it drives me insane. Fortunately he's fine if Booth isn't around since they aren't together a majority of the time.

Like you say, it's a case-by-case situation, both in terms of the dogs, and in terms of what the owner is aiming to have way to go
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Shadow

Lets GO
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 2, '12 11:38pm PST 
I definitely do not beat my dogs. And in spite of the fact that sometimes it may work out, for the average person raising two pups is way to much work. It most definitely can cause training and behavioral issues.

As far as the OPs question, only you can make that decision. You may find that your pup does just fine on her own. Either way don't get a dog just for your dog. You may find that you don't want another dog.
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