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Puppy Heartbeat...

Got a new, young, furry love in your life? This is the place for you to ask all of your questions-big or small! Just remember that you are receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a vet or behaviorist! Most important is to remember to have fun with your new fur baby.

  
Bella

Bella Boom Boom- Loves to Vroom- Vroom~
 
 
Barked: Fri May 25, '07 12:00pm PST 
Dear Dogsters,

I have a new puppy-- Italian Greyhound/Jack Russell Terrier/Papillon mix...

Does anyone have any info or links to the healthy heartbeat of a small-breed puppy? She weighs 5.2 lbs at 12.5 wks old...

Her heartbeat is really rapid. I'm assuming the vet would have checked this, but I don't recall her taking out the stethoscope...

Thanks,

Bella's Mom
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MacLeod

Best lil pal in- the world
 
 
Barked: Sun May 27, '07 9:34am PST 
When I first got MacLeod, his heart would be really fast, especially while he was sleeping. I was worried about it but the vet said it was OK and now (a few months later) it has slowed down quite a bit. If you are really worried you can ask your vet but I think it's probably normal for really young dogs.
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Jessie

Dog Breath - Less Enjoyed in- Moderation
 
 
Barked: Sun May 27, '07 6:54pm PST 
Remember thats puppies are much smaller than us, and therefore their blood circulates around there bodies faster than ours. That means a fast heartbeat should be normal. The vet may have checked the dog's pulse by simply putting his middle and index finger on his chest or his leg, and then if he has trouble finding it or suspects something he'll look closer into it. Next time you take a visit to the vet, remember to ask just in case something may be irregular.
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Bella

Bella Boom Boom- Loves to Vroom- Vroom~
 
 
Barked: Mon May 28, '07 10:55pm PST 
Thanks for the feedback-- I feel better about it alreadysmile

Her heartbeat is SUPER fast, faster than any pup I've ever raised. Then again, she's very energetic, and quite tiny/slim for her age. I figure if there was something wrong, the vet would have at least said something...
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Mingus, CGC,- R3GL

www.phetched.com
 
 
Barked: Tue May 29, '07 11:21am PST 
I found this information at http://www.dog-first-aid-101.com/vital-signs.html


Resting Heart Rate

Of the three vital signs, the resting heart rate for dogs shows the greatest variation. Unlike humans, the heart rate of dogs varies widely based on the size of the breed.

* Large-breed dogs (Newfoundlands, Rottweilers, Golden Retrievers, and similar size breeds over 50 pounds) have a normal rate of 70 to 120 beats per minute.

* Medium dogs (Border Collies, Cocker Spaniels and other breeds weighing 25 to 50 pounds) have a normal rate of 80 to 120 beats per minute.

* Small dogs (Miniature Poodles, Boston Terriers, Miniature Schnauzers and other breeds between 10 and 25 pounds) have a normal rate of 90 to 140 beats per minute.

* Toy dogs (Chihuahuas, Maltese and Yorkshire Terriers, and others under ten pounds) have a normal rate of 100 to 160 beats per minute.

Place a clock or watch with a second hand on a chair or table near you. Stand over your dog, with his head facing away from you. Place both hands on his ribs, below his elbows. Move your hands until you can feel his heartbeat easily.

Count the number of beats in a 15 second period, then multiply by four. Or count for 30 seconds and multiply by two.

While you're checking, also practice taking his pulse from other places. If he's ever ill and unable to stand, you won't be able to use the above method.

Other locations where you can check his pulse are the sides of his neck, on the inner thighs of his hind legs, and on his lower front legs, which is the equivalent of your wrists.
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Bella

Bella Boom Boom- Loves to Vroom- Vroom~
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 14, '07 1:25am PST 
Shanks Minkus!
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