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How to dog proof a fence?

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Howard

Tail Waggin'- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 19, '11 1:16pm PST 
deleted post

Edited by author Thu Nov 14, '13 12:54pm PST

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Turner - Gone Too- Soon

Hi I'm Turner- Wanna Smell My- Butt?
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 19, '11 2:49pm PST 
Even though I'm not a fan of it - have you ever used a hot wire....?thinking
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Howard

Tail Waggin'- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 19, '11 3:18pm PST 
No, I've never used it, but it wouldn't work.
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Halo

Howling good- times to be had- with me.
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 19, '11 4:32pm PST 
Why won't hot wire work? It's easy to install and works w/o needing a special collar so ANY animal, or human, would be zapped when they hit it. I use it to keep strays out and to teach my own animals, bt they dog, horse, goat, or pig to respect a fence.
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Turner - Gone Too- Soon

Hi I'm Turner- Wanna Smell My- Butt?
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 19, '11 6:01pm PST 
Surprising! I have a friend with 5 dogs, corgie, bassett, GSD, Lab, and border collie - loads of herding dogs right? They used to dig out, chase the horses, goats, cows and chickens. They put a hotwire low to the ground and let each dog out one at a time. Each dog got popped, some got popped a couple of times. But they learned quickly where the boundary was...
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Howard

Tail Waggin'- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 19, '11 9:21pm PST 
I don't know much about hot wire, but would it work in water? We're not big fans of hot wire or electric fencing. I don't think it would work since our fence is so out of shape, the grounds are so out of shape, too. One place where the dogs got out, the place where they got out was about a foot tall and the rest is flat and bumpy ground. I just don't feel comfortable using hot wire or electric fencing, though. Once there's a space where the dogs can get out, they figure a way to get out.

I went out today and put some more fencing wire low on the ground and a bit higher up and still it didn't work. I then got cable ties and went out with a piece of rebar and tied the rebar onto the fence with the cable ties and it seemed to work so that the dogs wouldn't push the fence. We do have tension wire at the bottom of the fence, but a lot has washed away, the water is so strong it actually breaks the tension wire and washes it away.
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Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 20, '11 8:50am PST 
A hot wore would work. The type of hot wire used with horses and cattle. You couldn't put it into running or standing water, but rain/snow would be fine.

The reason it would work is because it would shock the dogs for messing with the fence. You would need a pulsing charger (more expensive, but you don't want to kill a lot of birds/small things by trapping them on your fence.) You will need a ground wire/grounding for the fence, insulators to attach the hot wire to the fence. A hardware store/feed store would be the place to get all of this.


An alternative would be to look into field fencing using T posts. This is pretty easy to install and not too expensive. You would need to either string the fence a little above the ground and run a hot wire anyway or bury chicken wire along the base of the fence if they are into digging.

Our outer fence is just 6 strands of wire, about 3 or them are "hot" this isn't meant for keeping dogs in, just the horses, but a few times I have gotten out of my "dog yard" and didn't even consider going through the electric fence.

Good Luck

Edited to add, if you have a seasonal stream running through your fence, you need to address your drainage issues. Otherwise nothing but a hot wire will work. String the hot wire about 4 to 6 inches above the ground and the water will run under it.

Edited by author Sun Mar 20, '11 8:58am PST

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Quentin- Flagg

King Q - king of clown- town
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 20, '11 8:57am PST 
What is your fence constructed of? I'm not understanding why you are putting rocks and stuff in it. Is it possible you could rebuild the fence? Even use the materials at hand but just rebuild it. How tall is it? Is it possible to dig a trench under the fence line and fill it with rocks or even insert the fence a foot down into the ground so they can't dig under it? I have some ideas, but I need a little more description of what your fence is constructed of.

We have a wood fence that was falling apart and we just bought some new crossbeams (2x4) and used the existing fence panels and used new screws insead of the old rusty nails and rebuilt it.

I'll check back in a bit and see what you say about what your fence is made of and we'll go from there.
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Howard

Tail Waggin'- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 20, '11 12:09pm PST 
Quentin -

We have a chain link fence. If I could possibly take a picture of how bad the escape places are and put it on here if I could get some help with putting it in this thread, would that help any? I don't know if that's allowed or not, though. There's no way we could rebuild the fence, it's honestly so bad that there's no way that we could rebuild it. It's 4-5 feet tall. Building a trench would not work. The company who built our fence left it looking horrible, they wouldn't come back out and fix it either.

Edited by author Sun Mar 20, '11 12:10pm PST

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Halo

Howling good- times to be had- with me.
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 20, '11 6:40pm PST 
Okay, you will need:
What most supply shops call dog fence - 1 roll to patch the chain link.
Hog rings and hog ring pliers - for attaching the patches.
Wire cutters.
Enough short, temporary fence posts (look a bit like painted re-bar) to place one every 4 ft around the inside perimeter of the chain link.
1 screw on hot wire insulator per post (they slide over the post and twist to tighten into position.
1 or 2 rolls of aluminum electrical fence wire. (it is more flexible and easier to work with that steel wire.)
1 electric fence power box.

Now first cut and attach patches where needed to the chain link.
Next place the temporary fence post 2-4 inches inside the chain link.
Place an insulator 3 inches off the ground on each post.
Locate the fence box where you will plug it in but do not plug in yet.
Attach wire to fence box then route it through each insulator. The gap should be at the gate you use to get the dogs in and out so that it will not have electric fence in front of it.
Plug the box in, the indicator light will come on if you have done it right.
Once light is on, place dogs in fence. Yes they will yelp when they hit the hot wire, but, it does not harm, only frighten them and cause momentary discomfort - go touch it yourself to see if in doubt.

After a couple of weeks, you can unplug the box and I'd bet the dogs never test it.
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