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Castration/Spay Coat

Good grooming practices are essential for maintaining health and happiness for you and your dog. This is a forum to exchange tips and advice for proper care of your dog's hygiene needs.

  
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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 18, '12 9:27am PST 
Maybe the improvement in Max's body coat is because of the fish oil and vitamin E he now gets as well as the increased amount of protein and fat in his raw diet. I am a stickler for getting every bit of minerals and vitamins into him as he does seem to have issues nutritionally after seeing how his body responded to a raw diet.

Whether it is a coat influenced by hormones or not it must go!

Grooming stones are cheap, don't bother the dog as much as hand plucking but won't get the hair gone as well as plucking. They are a soft easily worn away and sharp textured pumice stone, the ones at the drug store for pedicures don't work. The flea comb is cheap too, might use it to get the bulk of it out and pluck the remainder. I used it for years as on another forum it was suggested that the MCK was cutting coat but MCK is much faster and bothers Max less so I am back to the MCK for feathers and body clean up. Any grooming tool can be overused and damage the coat but I am not real persistent about the whole thing and doubt I am doing more than needed except for his poor hock getting completely bald from not watching the grooming stone closely enough long ago!
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Kip-Kip

HELLO MY NAME IS- KIP AND I LIKE- THINGS!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 18, '12 11:25am PST 
WOW this post got all scrambled and repeated, trying to delete.

Edited by author Wed Apr 18, '12 11:35am PST

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Kip-Kip

HELLO MY NAME IS- KIP AND I LIKE- THINGS!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 18, '12 11:37am PST 
Sampson, I don't know if it's a male issue too or not- definitely female for sure though. I have heard of multiple accounts of it happening with neutered male Irish setters as well as with neutered cocker and cavalier king charles spaniels, though shrug Kip is not any of those breeds... and really, other factors could have caused those individual dogs to go "fuzzy," so who knows. I was only speculating and assuming that the hair growth regulators were to some extent hormone based- the only study I've found was this one which focused on spayed bitches -I think you need a membership to read it from that site, but if are currently in school at a University you might be able to find it in their online library database for free. With bitches, they don't go into the post-heat cycle sheds once spayed, so of course they will stay fluffier- it takes a while to regrow coat after blowing it out. Oogie's coat is looking fantastic post spay- she is just as shiny and fluffy as ever! I attribute much of her coat health to her diet, though; Kip's coat DEFINITELY looks better than it did when it was all falling out from his chicken allergy!! Little dude lost pretty much all of his guard hair and then some on his torso.

I didn't know that vitamin E was needed to aid in the absorption of fish oil- thank you for the information with that! And yes, my two are small; when I would give them the fish oil supplements I would squeeze a near half/half ratio out of one gelcap for each of the dogs, though Kip would get about 3 drops more than Oogie since he is nearly double her size. The one I used for them was one that the vet gave to me when Kip's hair started falling out from the chicken allergy (which had not yet been determined at that time). Anyway, I would probably just split a vitamin E gelcap in the same way between the dogs; if they were 400IU then Kip would get slightly over 200IU and Oogie would get slightly less than 200IU. Do you think that would be more appropriate for their size? Kip is 6.3 pounds, Oogie is 3.6. Or would it be better to find something smaller like a 200IU dose and split that dose between them?

Max, I am happy that your coat has improved! You sound like you are on top of it. And I agree, the fuzzies must go, regardless of how they showed up!

If the stones don't work as well as hand plucking, I will avoid them then. A metal flea comb seems like it would be a good investment anyway so I am going to go ahead and pick one of those up. I may end up getting one of those MCK brushes too just to have on hand- If I don't like it my parent's surely can end up using it on their Brittany Spaniel. Do you think the super-fine size 20 would be a good fit?
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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 18, '12 1:05pm PST 
Twice I have bought and sold fine MCKs. Only the coarse one works on Max for some reason, no idea why. Probably just me.

For cheap and you can return it if you don't think it is helping there is a similar tool at Petsmart. It is finer toothed than the MCK that works and I ...... returned it.
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Samson

Work? What's- that?
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 19, '12 6:37am PST 
I'm not sure. I don't think there is really any well-established rule sourced from sound science or anything. I've heard frequently that 400IU is the max for a large dog, and that's about a "normal" human daily dose. I wouldn't be comfortable giving a small dog 200IU a day. 100IU is probably what you'd want to give at max. It's fat-soluable so it isn't like it can be excreted by the kidneys.
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