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Hate being brushed and bathed!

Good grooming practices are essential for maintaining health and happiness for you and your dog. This is a forum to exchange tips and advice for proper care of your dog's hygiene needs.

  
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Bug

I'm just a- little Bug!
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 22, '11 11:46am PST 
So my pups HATE being brushed, and bathed. They will cry while they are getting washed and act like it is the worst thing in the world.

They aren't anywhere near as bad with the brushing, but they make it very clear they don't like it, and don't want to sit still at all.

Should I just keep with it, and keep brushing and bathing them regularly?
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Indiana- Jones

Car?! Did you- say car?!
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 22, '11 9:20pm PST 
I don't think any dog actually enjoys a bath. I know Indy hates getting water in his ears. He is actually pretty good in the tub, but if I step a few feet away and turn my back, he jumps out. Bad dog! lol

It could be a combination of things that make it unpleasant for the pups. Soap in their eyes (I use J&J baby shampoo for that reason). Water getting in their ears. The water temp (make sure it's not too hot or cold). Also the way they are bathed. When Indy was a pup, I would go slow with him and not rush through the shampooing. It's a process and no one wants to spend a lot of time (you or the dog). Some dogs are fine with a quick bath, but maybe your pups are nervous and scared to begin with. Perhaps start with the tub partially filled (up to their belly) and get some toys that float. Set them in and see if they can forget about the water and perhaps play a little. Don't use the sprayer or even show them the shampoo bottle yet. Then ease into it and maybe use a cup to get them wet and use the shampoo mixed with water so it spreads better. I have 2 rubber duckies for Indy. He likes to sink them and then go after them in the water. I usually let him play for a while and he has fun.

As for the brushing. I know poms have a lot of hair, but I don't know much about their maintenance. I assume they need to be brushed quite a bit. What kind of brush are you using? Wire, bristle.....I know those wire brushes can be harsh if they hit the skin. I use a regular bristle brush on Indy, but he has short hair.

~Good luck
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Miss Lola- Luftnagle

Solid Gold- Dancer
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 22, '11 9:43pm PST 
dogs fear water in there nose, you might try a wash cloth for the face area. Also, there are tethers that have suction cups to keep the dog in the tub/sink. I use one myself. Dilute the shampoo with warm water, some dogs hate cold shampoo. You as the owner, have to take control of the grooming situation, in a safe but firm way. I have 2 dogs that have to be groomed regularly. At first, when they were younger, they fought a bit, but I just kept on persevering, and they soon realized that I wasn't going to back down, and they learned that throwing a fuss wasn't going to get them anywhere smile
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Maple Leaf

Where's the- Squirrel?!
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 23, '11 4:03am PST 
Human and dog shampoo have different pH levels, I wouldn't recommend using anything other than shampoo made for dogs. There are many tearless options- most puppy shampoos are tearless!

As for the original poster--> using desensitization and counterconditioning to teach them that they are rewarded for dealing with something they normally dont like would help your situation. This would include the dogs getting treats when they SEE the brush and then treats for willingly allowing the brush to get near them and eventually on them and then treats for being brushed one stroke and build up to brushing the whole body- this will take many session, don't rush it. Use the same concept with the baths- if they dislike even the room the tub is in then you could start with feeding the dogs only near that room and eventaully IN the tub (you could teach the game 'get in the tub' even to help you with bathtime eventually!) and then increasing time in the tub and handling while in the tub- WITHOUT water first and eventaully a littttle water, etc.
Using high value treats as a reward is recommended, but some dogs only prefer the ability to leave the situations- a release from the situation.
BOOKS: The Power of Positive Training by Pat Miller
When Pigs Fly by Jane Killion - this one is clicker training which would help your SHAPE their behavior!
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Indiana- Jones

Car?! Did you- say car?!
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 23, '11 5:10am PST 
Maple Leaf,

Is the pH level different for their skin or hair? I always found the J&J to work fine. His hair is soft and he never had a reaction or dry skin. If it's bad for him, then I would use something else, but I would want to make sure it's gentle since he gets a bath about once a week. What kind of shampoo would you recommend?
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Bug

I'm just a- little Bug!
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 23, '11 10:41am PST 
Thanks guys.

I'm currently using a pup shampoo on them, and wash them in the sink since they are so tiny. I use warm water -- not to hot, and not too cold, since I know dogs like the water to be cooler, not hot like how we like it. laugh out loud

I'm also careful about their faces. The first time I bathed them I didn't even get their heads wet, I just washed their bodies, and they still cried about it a lot.

From what I know of Poms so far, they need to be brushed frequently to prevent their undercoat from tangling. And my two pups have a THICK undercoat.

I have a Furminator, a slicker brush, and one of the brushes that has the pin head on one side, and the soft bristles on the other.

I brushed them yesterday, and they did a bit better with it, but still didn't like it. I make sure to go pretty easy on them too, and not dig the brushes in so they hurt them.
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Miss Lola- Luftnagle

Solid Gold- Dancer
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 23, '11 7:07pm PST 
As a dog groomer, I would like to make one more suggestion. Get a metal comb.(coarse/fine) We see so many dogs come into the shop with just the surface of the hair brush, but when you get down to to skin level, we encounter mats, and even pelting. (think felt) There are sprays that seal the hair shaft, and make the job easier.
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Bug

I'm just a- little Bug!
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 23, '11 8:48pm PST 
Yeah I meant to buy a comb last time I was at the store but totally blanked on it. I have to run out to get cat food next week so I'll grab one then.

Does the furminator not get down to the skin?

My male is so fluffy he looks ratty 15 minutes after brush him. *sigh*
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Tinkerbell

I'm a- Fashionista!
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 25, '11 9:42am PST 
When I first came home to my owner I HATED being brushed or bathed! I was terrified of a brush or comb and would hide when my mom got the shampoo! BOL!! But now I'm used to getting bathed or brushed. I think you should keep bathing and brushing your pups! They might learn to like it if you try to keep it less traumatic. You should give them treats while brushing them and say they are a good boy or girl. Although some dogs just hate getting wet or the feeling of a brush on there fur. Maybe you could try a different type of brush. Good Luck!!
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Augustus- Gloop

Cheese, Glorious- Cheese...
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 27, '11 6:55pm PST 
furminator's are not ideal for poms. To get out the undercoat quickly, I would recommend a mar's coat king tool. Get's ton of coat out quickly. Just be careful, around hocks, tuck up etc. Then slicker/comb out. The furminator is geared more toward coats lengths like akitas, husky to lengths of around a lab. anything short your better off with a rubber curry brush. The flat round one are wonderful for JRT, pugs...
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