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diet to lower urine ph?

Discuss ways to improve the quality of your dog's life and longevity through proper nutrition; a place for all of your questions and answers about feeding your pooch!

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Dee Dee

Crazy wild child
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 9:26am PST 
Lately Dee Dee has had very high urine ph. It is running about 8. She is on the Purina Veterinary diet kibble and takes two 400 uroeze a day. For some reason the ph is not coming down. This morning the Dr suggested that we switch her food to the Royal Canine and see what happens. She has had struvite stones in the past and had to have surgery to remove them. Right now there are no crystals or blood in her urine which is good. Does anyone have any suggestions? I am getting really worried about this and am wondering what to do next? Thanks!
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Blue

President of- PlanetBlueDog.co- m
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 9:50am PST 
Your best choice maybe making a homemade diet for Dee Dee. If you have time constraints, you could use Sojos Grain-Free Dog Food and add your own meat. This way, you can control how much protein you add and offer a variety of meat/s. At planetbluedog.com it ships for free.

I read an interesting article on line that may offer some advice that you may not have come across yet...
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Diets For Pets With Urinary Tract Disease (FUS And Struvite Stones)

The majority of kidney and bladder stones and sand in pets are one of two kinds. One forms when the urine is acidic and the other when it is basic (alkaline). A diet made for cats and dogs with certain lower urinary tract problems that produce bladder stones or crystals in an acid urine (struvite) consists of: 1.5 lb of cooked ground chuck beef, with the fat retained, 1/4 lb of cooked calf’s liver, one cup cooked brown rice or mashed potatoes , 1 teaspoon canola oil, 1 teaspoon of phosphorus-free calcium carbonate (crushed calcium lactate or calcium gluconate) or 8 "regular Tums" tablets, and one quarter Centrum-type tablet or Pet Tabs given as directed on the bottle. The two most important factor in dissolving struvite stones are feeding a diet that maintains an acid pH urine and adding as much water as possible to your pet's diet to dilute its urine. Adding a moderate amount of salt and potassium chloride salt substitute will help encourge drinking. Taste the food. If it tastes too salty for you - it is too salty for your pet. To know if your home made diet is working, you will need to monitor your pet's urine pH and specific gravity.

You can add 56 - 84 ml (2-3 ounces) of water during cooking if the cat or dog will accept it. The more water your pet consumes, the more dilute it's urine will be and the more likely it will remain free of stones. The addition of a taurine tablet is advisable in cats of all kinds. Taurine deficiencies in cats can lead to heart and eye problems.

Feed approximately 1/4-1/2 lb per ten pounds body weight each day or the amount that maintains your pet's optimal body weight. This formula is designed to keep magnesium and phosphorus levels in the food to a minimum. In dogs, bladder stones can sometimes be dissolved using a diet low in protein (not under 15%) which has added salt or potassium chloride to increase water consumption (most of these dogs will need antibiotics as well).

In cats and dogs with oxalate bladder crystals, the addition of potassium citrate (300-500mg/day) will sometimes prevent relapse - but it will not dissolve oxalate stones that are already present. If you use it, your pet needs it divided during the day. The most important characteristic of a diet to prevent oxalate stones is it's ability to produce a near-alkaline (pH over 6.9) and dilute (specific gravity under 1.020) urine. There is no reason you can not monitor your pet's urine characteristics at home using a refractometer and pH strips. Lower protein, higher fiber diets are also though to be helpful. As much water needs to be added to the food as the pet will accept in order to keep its urine as dilute as possible.

There are now commercial diets sold by veterinarians that are formulated to attempt to prevent both struvite and oxalate bladder and kidney stones at the same time. These diets work by increasing thirst with added salt-substitute (KCl) and table salt - so your pet drinks more and, hopefully, keeps its urine too dilute for stones to form. Some also restrict protein, and keeping urine pH close to neutral. Royal Canin has made much of this data available. As I have already said, taste the food you make for your pet. If it tastes too salty, it is too salty.
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Good Luck!
Anne-Lise

Edited by author Mon Jan 25, '10 9:51am PST

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Jackson

I LOVEEEEE You!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 10:16am PST 
Hi there! wave

I agree, a homecooked or raw diet would be best. You could also try a supplement called Solid Gold Berry Balance, which helps to make the urine more acidic.
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Dee Dee

Crazy wild child
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 10:42am PST 
We tried the Berry Balance when this all first started but it did not help at all. At that time she was also eating Solid Gold food. this is driving me crazy. I am worried that this can cause some other health problems for her or that there is something going on that we don't know about already.
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Delta Force- CGC RN NA- RL1

Raw Fed and- Happy
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 11:36am PST 
I've just been doing some reading about struvite stones and it seems that the most common cause of them is a urinary tract infection. They keep saying that you don't need something to lower the pH because that will not kill the bacteria. You first have to kill the bacteria because the waste products of bacteria is what is making the struvite stones (magnesium, phosphate, etc.). Have you checked for a UTI?
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Dee Dee

Crazy wild child
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 12:47pm PST 
Dr said no sign of infection this time. Also no crystals just a high ph.
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Delta Force- CGC RN NA- RL1

Raw Fed and- Happy
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 2:39pm PST 
Hmm, well... HEY, I just read that giving your dog Apple Cider Vinegar will even out their pH in the digestive tract. Worth a try. I hear it's great for many other things too!
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Sedona

The Wise Cracker
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 2:51pm PST 
Have you tried Wysong Biotic pH-? Might help.
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Dee Dee

Crazy wild child
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 3:23pm PST 
i have not tried the Wysong or the ACV. Both are worth a try. I am jsut stressing so mcuh over this. I really don't want to put her on the Royal Canin - i have heard bad things about it.
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Sedona

The Wise Cracker
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 25, '10 4:05pm PST 
I'd save the RC as a last resort. I think the three things most likely to help are

1. Feed meaty foods - be it homemade, raw, or meaty kibble/canned.
2. Get more moisture in her - be it from feeding homemade or raw food, adding canned food and watering down the kibble...
3. Trying the something designed to lower urine pH like the Wysong supplement. Cranberries don't really lower the urine pH too much. They do some I believe but the beneficial part of cranberries is that it prevents bacteria from sticking to the urinary tract so the UTI bacteria can be flushed out. ACV might help too.

I'd try those things before feeding RC long term. Does the Doc know why her urine is alkaline?
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