GO!

Can action be taken to stop someone from euthanizing their healthy dog?

This is a forum to discuss legislation and legal matters pertaining to the rights and welfare of dogs. Please remember to counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice and responses.

  
(Page 1 of 5: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  
Diesel

1203828
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 6:12am PST 
Here is the back story: My mother-in-law purchased a Siberian Husky puppy about 4 months ago. Since having the puppy she has found that its very hyper (for her taste) and is causing her previous milder tempered dog to act out, so she has contimplated no longer keeping the dog. Also she has mentioned the dog might have caused some sort of damage to a muscle in one of his legs that 'may' require surgery down the road that involves extensive recovery treatment. I've yet to see this dog limp or show any sign of any 'damage'.

Now my problem: My mother-in-law is planning to have this young dog put down (if she can deceive a vet into doing it, other wise she plans to shoot it) because she absolutely refuses to give the dog to someone else because "they will not take care of it like she does". I understand it is hard to give up a pet and a terrifying thought that someone might mistreet them, BUT I absolutely do not agree that it is acceptable to simply kill the dog rather than hope the best for it in a new home. We have tried talking to her about how ridiculous her idea is and even tried to shed light on it from other perspectives, she refuses to understand or change her mind.

Question: Is there any action I can take to stop her from being able to carry out this process? I'm not sure of the laws and if it is actually legal to euthanize your own healthy pet. Is there somewhere I can report this situation to in hopes that it will be intervened?

I know someone would absolutely love to have this dog and give it a good home, and even be willing to take on any responsibility for future health problems it might have.

Edited by author Wed Aug 31, '11 6:14am PST

[notify]
Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 6:40am PST 
If she stated she would shoot the dog, definitely.

Call animal control and explain the situation to them and how she is threatening to shoot the dog.

That is so sad though. Point blank asking her that she's going to shoot a dog simply because she is not able to handle it? Have you shown her videos of people rollerblading or mushing or running or hiking with huskies?

Some people are just so incredibly and frustratingly stubborn. It always boggles my mind when people will do something like this because "they're the only ones that will care for it properly"....and yet they aren't able to realize (even with several pointing out the obvious) that what they are doing is far from properly caring for the dog.
[notify]
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 7:24am PST 
Talking about shooting one's own dog isn't a crime as far as I'm aware, and many people do do that in favor or actually bringing a dog into to be euthanized and don't face prosecution, so I don't think animal control is going to be able to touch this situation with a ten foot pole.

Fact is she hasn't done anything. Yet. But still, you cannot get someone in trouble for something they've never done.

And even if she did there would have to be evidence. Unless you have a phenomenal AC dept in your city I'd highly doubt they'd do anything even after the fact if you tried to report it. Maybe call and ask her, if she denied that would probably be the end of it.


I understand her feelings of concern over rehoming the dog. I have similar ones about my own and am not sure I could do it, especially Trigger as he gets older. That said, in conjunction I don't believe with THAT level of love and concern I could ever actually shoot one of my dogs...and I highly doubt your MIL could either. Think about it, if she can't mentally get through the idea of giving the dog away, what makes you think she could actually kill it?


I'm guessing she was merely venting out of frustration. And there are probably parts of the situation you're not privy to. Why aren't you giving her the benefit of the doubt as far as the injury goes? Simply because you've never seen a limp? Consider that there ARE outstanding health concerns, add to that her struggles with handling a breed she should have never acquired. That would be enough to overwhelm anyone. If I were you I'd try to get her to open up more about it. If she was ignorant enough to get a dog like this in the first place having no idea it was going to turn out exactly this way, she's also possibly ignorant to the fact that there are rescues who screen potential owners beyond her comprehension. Educate her about them, look up breed specific local ones and shoot the information her way. Help her see there ARE people that care about her dog as much as she does. Maybe it would help her to think of finding another home she could keep in touch with with updates about the dog, so she can see it's healthy and happy elsewhere.

Does she have a birthday coming up? Or even talking Christmas even though it's a ways out...maybe get her a gift certificate for training classes, or a behaviorist. Let her know if she wants to keep the dog you'll help her find a way to do that and be happy with the experience.

I really don't think reporting her for nothing she's done yet is going to be taking steps in any sort of positive direction.
[notify]

Harlow

st. francis of- asses
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 7:39am PST 
Trigger, what an absolutely thoughtful response applauseapplauseapplause
[notify]
Titus

Cave canis- vigilo omnis
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 8:55am PST 
Excellent post, Trigger! applause


Legally speaking, in many jurisdictions it's not illegal to shoot one's own dog, though depending on the area, she might face firearms charges (if shots are reported by neighbors), as opposed to animal cruelty charges. And it's legal to humanely euthanize any dog if you have a vet who will agree to it.
[notify]
Yoshi

XD
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 9:03am PST 
I second Trigger's opinion. smile Hmm, I'm wondering if she's just saying it to get a rise out of people. I can't imagine someone being so attached to their dog that they'd have concerns over rehoming it, then shooting it themselves. I think she's probably just saying it. D:
[notify]
Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 10:58am PST 
Shooting ones own dog in legal terms has a lot of ambiguity to it.

If someone shoots their dog in the legs...it is abuse.

If someone shoots their dog and kills it...well then they were just putting it down and that's ok.

See what I mean? If the result is death...then somehow that's ok legally? No, I don't think so....not in all cases.

I'm not saying it will hold much value or that AC or whatever will be able to do much, but shooting a dog is still a threat, especially on a healthy animal. And as such, should legally be looked into if all else fails.

The last law I read said something about it not being illegal if the animal dies instantly....so do you really think this woman will hold a gun in 1 hand, the dog's leash on another, and get a good shot in?

Getting AC or whatever involved brings in an outside point of view. This is not family or friends saying it is wrong, but a complete stranger saying it's wrong, if not legally, morally. It gives out a whole new perspective.
[notify]
Diesel

1203828
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 11:07am PST 
I understand your approach Trigger, unfortunately we've been through all of those steps already which is why I turned to wondering what other options there may be. I knew my post was already a bit lengthy so I didnt go into every detail of our other efforts to change her mind. She truley is a terrific pet owner and does go above and beyond caring for her dogs, but I know first hand that she will in fact shoot an animal herself because she's an old farm girl and has done it her entire life. She's put the dog through training but I think it's just turned into more of a handful than she expected. Again, I absolutely understand her reasoning for no longer wanting the dog, but I don't find it appropriate to simply kill the dog because she is too prideful to believe anyone else could care for it. We've discussed rescue options with her and have even had multiple people offer to take the dog. I would be more understanding of the health issue if it was something that had no chance of treatment, but this is apparently a surgery that the dog "might" need "eventually", not enough reasoning to me to put a 6 mo. old dog down.
I understand if there is nothing we are able to do about it because I realize she hasn't done anything wrong, but I would feel awful if I didnt atleast research it and see if there were any options.

Thank you all for your suggestions and comments I really appreciate them!
[notify]
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 11:19am PST 
"If someone shoots their dog in the legs...it is abuse."

She wasn't saying she wanted to shoot to maim it though Sanka, she was saying she was contemplating shooting it to put it down because she felt she had no other options.


"If the result is death...then somehow that's ok legally? No, I don't think so....not in all cases."

In most places, actually it is very legal. In all cases. In my area law enforcement would probably laugh if such a thing was reported, pretty sure they'd hang up on anyone reporting just a mere threat of such action.



"The last law I read said something about it not being illegal if the animal dies instantly....so do you really think this woman will hold a gun in 1 hand, the dog's leash on another, and get a good shot in?"

Most times a single shot of reasonable caliber will kill a dog instantly. But there again, pretty sure she wouldn't video the event or invite a crowd. And prove the dog didn't die instantly...no one would be able to. Most dogs will sit when asked, or can be tethered to a tree. It's not a gnat. If she's got a gun chances are she'll be able to make a decent shot on something like a decent sized dog.

Again though it comes back to, if she claims to love the dog as much as she does, how could she possibly even set that scenario up? Could she even pull the trigger? A seriously doubt it.



"Getting AC or whatever involved brings in an outside point of view. This is not family or friends saying it is wrong, but a complete stranger saying it's wrong, if not legally, morally. It gives out a whole new perspective."

I'd be pretty ticked if anyone law enforcement wise was calling me up lecturing me about morality. That's not their job. This woman doesn't need a lesson in morals, if she has conscience enough not to want to abandon a dog she took responsibility over in a shelter only to end up with God knows who she's got plenty enough as far as I'm concerned.

She needs help. Not judgment. End of story.
[notify]
Augusta,- CGC, RN

Such a Good Dog!
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 31, '11 12:24pm PST 
"Again though it comes back to, if she claims to love the dog as much as she does, how could she possibly even set that scenario up? Could she even pull the trigger? A seriously doubt it."

I wouldn't be so absolutely confident of that--if she has a gun and has expressed those feelings . . . . because I've definitely heard of people who kill their own children out of a misguided act of love--can't bear to see someone else take care of them or take them--or saddest of all--imagine how their children could go on in a world without them when they're feeling suicidal.

You may be right, she may just be venting, but . . . . I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss it either, since none of us on Dogster *know* this lady--our perception of what we could or couldn't imagine doing may not apply.

I do whole heartedly agree with trying to open her up to her options though! way to go With rescues or training. Maybe someone from a rescue would even be willing to talk to her--she may be more receptive listening to an outside rational source rather than feel like her family is trying to tell her what to do and making it combative.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 5: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5