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Dental for a 12yo?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 31, '13 11:53pm PST 
Both of my cats have had dentals as seniors. One at 11, and the other at 12 years of age. Both had bloodwork and a urinalysis done to make sure that their bodies could handle the anesthetic.

As Toto said, funky teeth and gums contribute to a lot of different health issues, so much so that my vet and I made the decision to proceed with an extensive dental for one of my cats even though his test results were not wonderful (extra precautions were taken and everything turned out just fine).
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Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 1, '13 6:40am PST 
Thanks all. I've been mulling over it for some time now and still can't quite make a decision on it. I'll be sure to ask the vet. Aside from his ears, he wouldn't need anything else done while getting a dental, so it'd be pretty simple.
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Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 6, '13 7:05am PST 
Just an update.

I went ahead with the dental on Sanka. He had 1 tooth removed, but other than that, everything went just fine. He now has nice shiny teeth.

Here's the before and after pic the vet gave me.
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Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 6, '13 10:17am PST 
Seems not everyone is aware that dental cleanings can be performed without anesthesia. Either the vet is trained with this approach (which may also require more time and a special quiet space and low key time in the clinic) or a technician specifically trained to do this comes in at scheduled times to do the dental cleanings. Combined with a homeopathic remedy prior to the cleaning(releases the nasties off the teeth easier), these "standing dentals" can be effective. I am not one who totally buys in to the fully sedated dentals where the "deep cleaning" is actually taking off a very necessary layer of enamel.

The doggy dentists I met were like surgeons and wanted to examine, clean, and treat teeth only on anesthetized dogs. My people convinced them to examine my teeth while I was fully alert. I was so good that the dentists were shocked at how much they could learn so quickly in a brief visit. Needless to say, the dentists agreed that I had all kinds of chips, cracks, dents, etc that they could fix with full on oral surgery. They also didn't want me eating raw anything (veggies, fruit, meat, bones) because they felt all that is horrible for canine (and feline) oral health. The kibble and canned food that they sold in the front of the clinic was the only stuff they recommended. Hahaha! I went in symptom free for more of a wellness check and for my person to learn more about canine oral health. Left the dentists' office disappointed in their approach.
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Ikan

976039
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 6, '13 4:31pm PST 
If the dog is in good health. And after tests the vet says they would be fine to go under. I think I would have it done. Like someone said. The benifits of getting the teeth cleaned up are more then letting them go and risking other problems like heart problems from bad teeth. I try to brush my digs teeth. And I give them greenies as treats. It seems to help then look nice
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