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Elevated phosphate?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
Princess- Shadow

Adopted dogs are- the BEST kind!
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 26, '13 8:59am PST 
Anyone else having or had this trouble with their pup? We did Shadow's senior bloodwork a few weeks back and the vet said that she has elevated levels of phosphate and proscribed us Marin to try and get them to go down.

We just did her recheck once she finished the Marin and the levels have elevated a little more instead of going down. He now wants us to do some abdomen x-rays to see what is going on.

Just wondering if anyone has had to deal with this and how you resolved it or are maintaining it.

Sincerely Appreciative-
Princess Shadow and fam dog
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 26, '13 1:46pm PST 
It is an indicator of potential kidney issues. In Toto's case, we were told to get him on a lower protein, senior diet.
We have not repeated his blood work recently so don't know if he is still higher or not. His was not terribly elevated, but he has chronic UTI's which is why the blood work was done in the beginning. For whatever reason, he has been fine for the last 6 weeks with NO changes except adding Cosequin daily.
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Scooter,- PAWS

Power of the Paw- for those who- need it
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 28, '13 5:32am PST 
Yes it could be an indicator of a couple of things including kidney disease, but I thought other numbers would be elevated as well? a lower phosphorus diet wouldn't hurt.

I actually started eating Wellness senior mix a year ago because I had bloodwork possibly indicate renal insufficiences. Wellness senior mix is one of the lower dry dog foods with low phosphorus. Here are others:

http://dogaware.com/health/kidneynonprescription.html

But talk to your vet first and see if they would recommend a lower phosphorus diet. From what I an tell it's not just kidney issues...it could be other things too. I found this article which you might find helpful.

http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/cardiovascular/c_dg_ hyperphosphatemia

Please make sure to remove any spaces. They can be hard to catch, but if you copy and then paste it and it says the webpage can't be found, look where you may see a % 20 and remove it. way to go
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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 28, '13 7:22am PST 
The link c/p correctly but goes to a long list of everything. When I searched on hyperphosphatemia in dogs in dogs it was the first think that came up. With the same address! Please read the whole thing but here are possibilities.
"Causes
Vast quantities of phosphorous are located in the bones and teeth, bonded with calcium. Therefore, bone diseases or problems such as bone resorption can cause excessive phosphates to be released in the dog's bloodstream. Other underlying factors for hyperphosphatemia include:
Bone cancer
Osteoporosis
Kidney disease
Thyroid disease
Excessive dietary supplementation (e.g., vitamin D overdose)"

Please find the cause before changing the diet. None of those issues are treated with removal of excessive phosphorus.
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Princess- Shadow

Adopted dogs are- the BEST kind!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 8:42am PST 
Well I really have the term wrong then because our vet says that it's a liver issue. He put us on a supplement called Marin to see if it would come down and it did not it actually elevated a bit more. He wants to do x-rays now to see what the liver is doing.

Poor thing has been through the ringer ever since we moved.
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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 8:59am PST 
Maybe he gave you a name of one of the liver enzymes, at least one has phosph* as part of it's name.

Sassy always had a wonky liver enzyme or another. The liver secretes them in response to what is going on in the body. She always had a bit of a heart murmur and something that looked like degenerative myelopathy and flea allergy. If your dog isn't perfectly healthy elsewhere it really is likely liver enzymes are going to be moving all over the place. I am sure the medication is a good idea to support the liver function. I did give one to Sassy when she could tolerate supplements.
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Jace

Swiffer
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 9:00am PST 
Yes, Marin is a liver support product. Is it possible your dog has "elevated liver enzymes". A broad term for liver issues. Each part of the liver test suggests a way to turn based on results.
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Princess- Shadow

Adopted dogs are- the BEST kind!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 9:43am PST 
Thanks Jace! Have you had trouble with your pups liver?

Sassy- She is otherwise a healthy girl so that's why we are wondering what is up. I mean she does have hip dysplasia and arthritis but I'm not sure that is considered a health issue.

I don't doubt the Marin working but like I said instead of the enzyme going down it went up a bit more.

Edited by author Tue Jan 29, '13 9:51am PST

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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 2:18pm PST 
If there is inflammation then the liver is probably adjusting things constantly trying to keep things under control. Have you seen this article? References for further reading too.
http://www.dogaware.com/health/liver.html
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Princess- Shadow

Adopted dogs are- the BEST kind!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 31, '13 8:32am PST 
I have looked it over a bit and also bookmarked it. Guess we will have to wait for the xray results to know more.

If anyone has had liver issues with their dog, experiences and outcomes are appreciated!
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