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Paralysis,disc rupture,spinal injury,degenerative disease & HOPE!!!

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
Bella

1278733
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 21, '12 9:51pm PST 
On December 1, 2012, at 1:15AM, our little Bella, a Pomeranian Japanese Chin dog (4 years old) suffered a spinal injury after chasing one of our cats. She was paralyzed. Within an hour we had her at the vet, only to be informed that this was not good. It appeared that she'd probably been born with a condition called IVDD, and this may have caused a disc rupture, or such sort of trauma to her spinal cord. Our options were surgery, however the MRI machine located in my city is broken. This would mean sending her out of province, or out of the country, to have this surgery performed. The cost of the surgery? A minimum of $4000. Being a family of five, with three small children, I am a stay-at-home mom, this was not an option. Or, we could euthanize her. This was something we couldn't even fathom. The other option was the 'conservative method' of rehabilitating her. She remained at the vet for 36 hours. During that time, our world was rocked. We couldnt believe how in a moment, everything changed for Bella. I couldn't sit still. I felt helpless. So sad for her. There HAD to be something else we could do for her?? After tearing the Internet apart, I was led to a product called Nzymes. I started reading, listening, and watching the stories of people and the results they had encountered with the product. Not only with paralysis, but many other health issues. Having a dog who desperately needed all the help she could get, I realized that I had nothing to lose but possibly everything to gain by trying this for Bella. It gave me hope.. I brought home a shell of a dog from the vet. It wasnt our Bella. Our hearts were broken. We felt such devastation. We knew this was going to be a long road. Bella had no movement or strength in her back end. She had no 'bathroom controls' either. But at least those worked. It would occur randomly. We were told to keep her in a crate for 6-8 weeks. No movement. For the first two days after bringing her home from the vet she just slept. On the third day home, 5th day after her injury, we took her to a Natural Healing Vet to start treatment and Rehab. She received Accupunture, and Lazer Therapy for half an hour. That day, the Nzymes arrived and we started her and our 3 other animals on the product. After that, she just started getting better and better everyday, and stronger. On day 13 after her injury, and day 9 of Nzymes, she took her first steps!!! And now, on the eve of week 3, I have a little dog walking everywhere!!! She looks a bit like a drunken sailer, but its just amazing!! To think she walked within 2 weeks of her paralysis? She also has full bathroom functions and control back, and lets us know when she wants out. We are so happy. 3 weeks ago, Bella was a limp rag doll. She couldn't stand on her back legs at all. If she did move, she could only pull herself along like a seal. There is so much more to tell about, but it would be a novel. smile We have our Bella back in everyway. After a total of 3 visits to the Natural Healing Vet, and Nzymes, I have a dog who's prognosis was not promising, but yet rose above it all. If I had listened to the traditional Vet, I would've left her in her kennel for the next 6 to 8 weeks. But I have learnt to not to let her waste and wither away, as we can clearly see she has it in her to heal and walk again. Her damage is done. Leaving her confined would only have broken her spirit even more, and weaken the strong muscles she has now. Conservative treatment has definitely been the best for our little one. We massage her and work her legs and muscles frequently during the day and keep her mobile, because we can and she wants to!!!! I never thought there was hope, but with the path we were lead down, everything we've done has contributed to her being back on her feet in such a short time. Anyone who is faced with this, please know there's Hope. We did everything right, even though we couldnt afford the surgery, but taking the 'natural' way with rehabilitation, and Nzymes all played a big part. We didn't give up, and we're so glad we didn't!!! smile
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 21, '12 10:54pm PST 
This seems like a product pitch to me. I have had two dogs in paralysis, one an IVDD Dachshund and the other a GSD who had a catastrophic disc explosion. One was operated on (the GSD) and the other (a Dachshund) was not. If the vet could not operate, he would have put your dog on corticosteroids, a very important anti inflammatory. All my dogs are either fed raw or are on enzymes. I know enzymes well, and ground soybean sprouts are unlikely to aid in traumatic inflammation.

So I myself can say yes, there IS hope. I've had two dogs come back from full hindend paralysis. Under a vet's care. One very costly, one less so. But dogs recover from this stuff every day, and it is VERY important to remember that these are very painful conditions that require proper veterinary supervision.
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 21, '12 11:56pm PST 
I don't believe in miracle cures.
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 22, '12 1:11pm PST 
Sabi....speaking of. I tried to corral your attention on the DM thread. If you want a cool site, go back there, let me know and I'll put it up!

I am fine with alternative approaches, but there needs to be a responsibility attached. Spinal problems can be notoriously expensive. They also are extremely painful and require proper veterinary care. Soybean sprouts have some good, healthful properties, have anti inflammatory properties, but also can be contaminated and are a soy product, and thereby something some dogs won't tolerate well. There was an Nzyme study done with good result, but the dogs studied primarily had osteoarthritis, which is a sight different than spinal trauma. This is a potentially very serious problem where aftercare is critical. Whispering in people's ears the miracle cure of soybean sprouts in replacement of conventional veterinary care to me is not ethical. The acupuncture and lazer therapy mentioned in the OP are both of known benefit and likely had far more to do with recovery.
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Bella

1278733
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 22, '12 1:15pm PST 
Bella was on prednisone and robaxin after her injury. She got all the proper meds while at, and after the vet stay. She remained on them until and up day 10. I'm not product pitching, I have nothing to gain from doing that, all we know is what we were told by our natural healing vet. She told us that whatever we were doing, to keep on doing it because she was doing 'amazingly great'. To have her starting to walk so soon, 'something' comtributed to that, it cant be denied. When faced with such a traumatic event, and having listened to your dog screaming, and seeing her body all distorted, knowing you cannot afford the surgery, you'll do whatever you can. After reading all the success stories, I saw people saying 'I thought it was too good to be true' etc etc, only then to see and hear how their dogs had started to improve, I thought that ALL these people can't be wrong!!! And really, I could either have done nothing, or tried it. I mentioned I also have 3 other animals, two of them being a very senior dog and cat. The changes in those two, is crazy. Especially the 12 year old dog. He's running, jumping, playing, fighting and wants to go go go. Something we haven't seen in years. He has had arthritis for years, hindering his mobility. Not anymore. So, you can say 'product pitch' all you want, I'm telling you that this worked. No other changes to the dogs Zero G food diet, except the addition of Nzymes. Same as the cat. It's undeniable. I was in a very dark, despaired place after this happened to Bella, and I'm the type of person to not stop till I find answers. I needed to know we were going to do all we can, even though surgery was not able to be an option. And to have a dog who less than three weeks after her injury is walking and back to being herself? I know that what we did was the right thing. If you don't try, you won't know right? I'm the type of person that has to know, and even though it all sounds to good to be true, it is true. I found something that seemed hopeful,, and it worked. I'm a big skeptic too, but I know we did all we could for Bella, and to have her back, is wonderful. And that's all that matters. smile
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Bella

1278733
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 22, '12 1:36pm PST 
I just wanted to add this in, regarding the comment about soy being bad for animals, Nzymes are entirely sprout-derived, it avoids trypsin inhibitors which are found in raw soybeans which can disrupt the digestive tract. Being made from sprouts, they are completely different from every other soy products which are made from the beans. If we had followed the traditional vets 'care' she would still be boxed up in her kennel. We took her back to the traditional vet yesterday to show them that Bella is walking, and they brought every staff member out to come and see her. They were all amazed at her success. I'm now working on compiling my video diary of her day to day improvements so that they can use her story to show to other patients in the same situation. They were the ones who suggested bringing her to the natural healing vet for treatment. Doing the alternative treatment absolutely played a big part in her recovery, I would recommend it to anyone. After Bella's last appt with the NH vet on Monday, we no longer need to take her back, unless something drastically changes. smile

Edited by author Sat Dec 22, '12 1:50pm PST

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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 22, '12 2:10pm PST 
I swear I am not trying to be mean....so please know that. I can totally see why Nzyme works with arthritis. I'd recommend it for that, along with a raw diet. Also for allergies as long as the dog is not soybean sensitive....if you look at reviews, you will find the occasional person whose dog actually got worse, which is why.

The thing to keep in mind, re your IVDD dog, is all the approaches you took. You don't know what % what did to which. The course you are describing is not outside normal ranges. Typically, surgery is a matter of hours....if the dog can't get to surgery right away (speaking hours here), results are less successful and non surgical approaches are implemented. Typically, swelling will subside in two weeks, and it is not at all uncommon for hindend use to be regained in two weeks. My IVDD Dachshund regained hindend function in ten days, my GSD (whose injury was incredibly catastrophic...he ended up at a premier veterinary college and the vet there, one of the best in the country, defined it as the worst trauma he had seen in his career), started to regain function in three weeks. Some take longer, or of course don't recover.

Invertebral discs have a very low blood supply and take in little nutrition. Any enzymatic supplementation will aid the body to heal and/or maintain itself, but just on pure science will not have a lot of influence on the discs themselves. Maybe a passionate raw feeder will come on here, but you are always better using natural foods, vs pills, the former of which are more bioavailable.

It is important to remember is that IVDD is never cured. At only four years old, you may well go through this again. She has calification, which nothing can cure and prones her to injury. If you do feel in your heart that Nzymes helped her, I would totally consider putting her on a raw diet. Part of the benefit of Nzymes is that it is live, raw food. There is simply no way the anti inflammatory properties of soybeans could have addressed such severe trauma so quickly. I am not a naysayer, I promise you. I feed some of them raw, all of them are on enzyme supplements, I believe in super foods and their natural properties, totally. But what addressed the recovery of your pooch was a combination of the approaches. Were she to suffer again, repeating that course is your best defense.

Dodger'slist.com is a very helpful and a good learning tool. Cage rest also must continue if this injury was recent. Too much too soon can reignite the problem. ***REMEMBER*** that function returns more quickly than the disc itself recovers. The disc causes trauma to the spinal cord, and it is that effect (the spinal cord trauma) that leads to the paralysis. The swelling goes down and function returns, but the disc remains in a state of healing past that, which is why the cage rest protocol is so essential, even with full mobility regained.

Edited by author Sat Dec 22, '12 2:13pm PST

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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 22, '12 6:26pm PST 
Tiller, I will patiently await any info you have.

Bella, I own a dog that was supposed to be crippled and is not. At 5 years old I took her through a round of acupuncture. The results after one treatment were astounding and definite, the results after the entire course were nothing short of amazing. My point is as Tiller said you pursued a number of treatments and cannot accurately say what is responsible. To pin your hopes on a fairly new drug may be setting yourself up for a huge fall. I would rather see you continue with the acupuncture that is well proven to help and has been tested and proven for centuries.

Either way I hope she continues to do well.
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