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DAPP Vaccination?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

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Hadley

1173616
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 16, '12 9:09am PST 
Don't vaccinate. Take your pup to the vet and test their antibodies (titer test) and that will suffice as evidence your dog is immune. You might have to show a few people because sadly, most people aren't informed on titers, but they show immunity which is much more than a vaccine really shows.

My dogs never been vaccinated and a year ago we wanted to enroll here in some sort of class, can't even remember, we titered her and she was immune. My dog didn't need artifical immunity through some toxic concoction, she just needed me to give her a healthy diet and a good immune system so she can build immunity on her own.

Titers ARE more money, but worth it to not have to shoot those toxins into their blood stream.
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Lily and- Moira

Happy Birthday- to us!!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 16, '12 5:53pm PST 
I follow Dr Dodds protocol - at least the one that was in effect when I had to make this decision. A pup needs several DAPP or DHPP vaccines with a booster at a year old, then every three years after that. Rabies is given at four months, boostered at a year and then every three years. Lily and Moira get Lepto in May as we walk in wild animal territory, sometimes with lake overflow. It is always given alone as are the others. Bordetella only if they are to be boarded at the vet's facility, not regularly. Lily will get no more DHPP as she is over seven years old. I'm glad my dogs are given the vaccines separately as when Moira reacted to the rabies, I knew which one it was that caused the reaction.

I've lost a pup to distemper and seen a dog with Parvo. IMO, they need vaccines, but not overvaccination. I wouldn't take a dog without Parvo vaccination outside or around other dogs!
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Jim

Throw the Dang- Ball!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 17, '12 5:01am PST 
Have you thought about doing your dog's vaccines yourself? You can buy vaccines online or at most feed stores. It is a lot cheaper than going to a vet. Plus, you know exactly what your dog is getting. I know distemper and parvovirus can be given seperately. Some people prefer to do vaccines seperately than do combination vaccines.
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 17, '12 1:32pm PST 
Cheaper is certainly not always better, in fact, it seldom really is better at all! I don't know too many average pet owners equipped to deal with a full blown anaphalatic shock in their pet at home, nor many who would even recognize their pet was in trouble before it was too late to get it to the vet for treatment. Having lost a dog to a vaccine reaction and had others suffer serious reactions including complete collapse, giving my own vaccines doesn't sound much safer at all.
How many times have you gone into your local feed store and seen incoming stock sitting in the back room waiting for hours until someone has time to unpack it during the heat of Summer??? Trust me, that is all it takes to render that vaccine totally unsafe and ineffective. Same with ordering online... unless you are home to receive the package when it arrives, chances are it will NOT be properly refrigerated and still safe for use, or that it didn't sit on the tarmac for five hours waiting to be loaded onto a plane. Freezing is also a quick way to render a vaccine ineffective as well.
I KNOW my veterinarian's office properly stores their vaccines and I know they are prepared to handle my dog when it collapses in shock from an allergic reaction to that vaccine and since I am AT the vets already, I know they have all the proper drugs and equipment to handle that reaction immediately as well as the knowledge necessary to handle it. I do not have all these drugs and oxygen tents and IV lines at my home and I do not know too many average pet owners who do either.
Maybe Jim is willing to take this risk with his dogs, but, as well trained as I am in veterinary medicine, frankly, I am not prepared to lose my dog trying to save a couple of bucks on a vaccine, probably already one of the least expensive parts of routine veterinary expenses.
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Jim

Throw the Dang- Ball!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 17, '12 1:39pm PST 
The vaccines you can buy online are just as good as the ones from the vet. If your dog has already received the vaccine and you know there is no reaction, then giving it at home is not at all dangerous. I’m assuming the poster has had her dog vaccinated before. I’ve never seen incoming stock sitting in the back room at my local feed store. I worked in a veterinary clinic for over 50 years, so I think I know a little about vaccines. Not to mention, it’s winter and the chances of vaccines sitting out in the heat is slim to none. In fact, the cool weather will probably refrigerate the vaccines for you! LOL Yes, if you receive a frozen vaccine, it’s probably not a good idea to use it. How do you know your vet properly stores vaccines? Have you really gone back there and checked?

Edited by moderator Mon Dec 17, '12 4:26pm PST

Edited by forums moderator
Hadley

1173616
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 17, '12 2:09pm PST 
I'd have to agree it's not anymore dangerous giving the shot yourself than giving the shot at home. Most vaccine reactions don't happen over night but infact happen anywhere from as long as three weeks after a vaccination. Giving them at home isn't any more riskier than doing it at a vet's office.

With that, I don't vaccinate any of my animals and when I needed immunity proof, the titer showed she had immunity. Vaccines clearly aren't the only way to get immunity or else how does my unvaccinated dog show immunity on a titer? Think about it smile
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 17, '12 5:10pm PST 
Jim, first of all, an allergic reaction characteristically DOES NOT occur with the first exposure to the allergen, it normally requires an exposure to built the antibodies which CAUSE the reaction so your are taking a much greater risk with each succeeding vaccine, not the other way around. Pretty basic information be it veterinary or human medicine. Why do you suppose you have to remain in the waiting room for 20 minutes after receiving a vaccine from your own human doctor... it is to watch for a reaction.
And, both my dog who DIED from an anaphylactic collapse from a DHLPP vaccine and the one which almost died but was fortunately saved because it was at the vets already, reacted almost immediately, we had not even left the exam room, much less the clinic. These two dogs collapsed within five minutes of receiving the vaccine!
Also, I have worked for many, many years at a veterinary clinic, I still do often, and I know how quickly incoming sensitive supplies are correctly stored.
I do not believe a social network for dog lovers is any place to be promoting home vaccinations, it is NOT SAFE for the average pet owner and can and usually does ultimately end up costing far more money, if not actually costing the poor dog its very life.

Edited by moderator Tue Dec 18, '12 10:07am PST

Edited by forums moderator
Bunny

The Snow Bunny
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 18, '12 4:36am PST 
I'm new here and wanted to try out the discussion boards and maybe help some other doggie moms and dads out there on topics I feel that I am knowledgeable in.

Small dogs at are bigger risks of side effects from vaccines than larger dogs. Combination vaccines are the most dangerous. Some side effects may take up to three days to fully present. Spayed/neutered dogs also have more side effects and life threatening reactions than intact ones. In my opinion, if this class requires a vaccine, don't go. Vets are giving dogs way too many vaccines to begin with! Many dogs will reacte to vaccines with hives, anaphylaxis, cardiac arrest, cardiovascular shock, or sudden death.

This is just my opinion, but I personally wouldn't give my dog unnecessary vaccines just for a training class.

shrugshrugshrug
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Dogster HQ


 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 18, '12 10:11am PST 
This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice.
Zephyr

1213425
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 18, '12 1:31pm PST 
DAP is required for my work and where I take my dogs for training. We had a puppy wind up with neuro-distemper (Pre-purchase by my grandfather. An expensive mess and Tiger was near death) and was frankly, never the same. Something was very 'not right' about him so I'd rather risk comparatively uncommon side-effects for the Distemper alone. Currently three of my dogs have the 3-year, and in two/three years when it expires I'm getting titres on my younger three which are considered 'good' for 3 more years. The oldest is old enough next year to get exemptions and my vet is happy to do it for me.

Oddly, Lepto is on the rise in my area (it's on the reporting disease list for animals and people) so they were vaccinated last year. I didn't bother this year since I wasn't out hiking with as much and it's not required.

I don't believe in over-vaccinating but I think, personally that to leave your dogs will no antibodies to reasonably common maladies with no history of vaccine reactions by the dog or in the dog's family/no documented medical cause to delay or not give vaccinations is a mistake.

If your dog has ever been vaccinated before for Distemper/Parvo, get a titer test. If not and you want to train at this class, you will have to bite the bullet, do it once and then hope the antibodies show up for the rest of her life in testing.
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