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Vitamin E Overdose Toxicity?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
Pookie

plush destroyer
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 12, '12 7:21pm PST 
So I came home to find that my little 14 lb papillon has gotten into the vitamin E bottle. From a 500 count bottle of softgels, about 1/3 are missing. Figures that out of all the pills/vitamins she absolutely refuses (including beef/peanut butter flavored chewable tablets) she apparently eats human Vit E pills like crack. So how dangerous is Vit E in large doses? Should I make her vomit? She's acting fine so far.
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Sarah,- CW-SR,- CW-G1, CGC

Million Dollar- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 12, '12 7:37pm PST 
Vitamin E is fat soluble, so all of that will be stored in the dog's body, making it difficult for dogs to flush the vitamins out of their system. I took this info from http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=vitamins

Vitamin E (Tocopherol)

Effects: Acts as a biological antioxidant, and is required for normal reproduction. There are several forms of vitamin E. The most biologically active form is know as alpha-tocopherol, which should be supplemented as alpha-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol acetate, or alpha-tocopherol succinate. Other forms, like gamma-tocopherol or beta-tocopherol, do not provide the same level of protection. Vitamin E from natural sources is labeled as alpha tocopherol or d-alpha tocopherol - dl-alpha tocopherol indicates a synthetic, less effective product. Do not give cheap vitamin E supplements that contain high levels of vitamin A, since this could lead to an overdose of vitamin A and possibly vitamin A toxicity. Vitamin E is also important for the formation of red blood cells and it helps the body to utilize vitamin K.
Deficiency: A deficiency of vitamin E can lead to decreased reproductive performance, retinal degeneration, and impairment of the immune system.
Toxicity: None known, but high levels of vitamin E can adversely affect the absorption of vitamins A and K, causing deficiencies. In the case of vitamin K this can interfere with normal blood clotting.
Stability: Vitamin E is sensitive to heat, light and oxygen and significant losses have been found after relatively short times of food storage.
Sources: Wheat germ, corn, nuts, seeds, spinach and other green leafy vegetables, asparagus, vegetable oils.


Sarah had Vitamin D toxicity, but that's different... You can call the ASPCA's poison control hotline to find out what to do. I think it's like $60.
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Pookie

plush destroyer
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 12, '12 7:48pm PST 
Yeah I think I'd rather just make her vomit. Everything I've read said Vit E overdose isn't toxic and the ER vet told me it isn't usually a problem.
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Pookie

plush destroyer
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 12, '12 8:01pm PST 
Well scratch that. After 20+ ml of peroxide she still won't vomit for me. Guess I'll just have to keep an eye on her. shrug
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 4, '12 11:42am PST 
Guest, your copied and pasted info on Vitamin E sources is all well and good, HOWEVER, if you had READ the posts above, this dog got into a bottle of Vitamin E capsules and overdosed on them and therefore, is not in need of foods that provide them in the human diet, but is concerned about symptoms of overdose of it.
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