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Is there any way to fix/reverse Hip Dysplasia?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Keiko

Where are you- going? Can I- come?
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 12, '10 12:13pm PST 
I'm positive that there have been many, many threads in this forum about this, but I can't seem to track them down using Dogster search since HD is mentioned in so many conversations on the site that it's hard to filter it down. So if there's already been a good thread on the subject, I'd love to read it if someone can track it down. big grin

Basically, I'm concerned about Keiko, who is a very active dog but has noticeable hip problems. She hasn't been formally diagnosed with X-rays (she's my parents' dog and they're OK just treating symptoms...if I insist on it when I visit I'm sure I can get a real diagnosis, though), but she shows pretty classic HD symptoms. It really looks like a structural issue. It's heartbreaking, though, because she looks just so happy and FULFILLED when she's running/jumping/chasing, and I hate to think of the impact it'll have on her quality of life if her hip problems get any worse (right now she's at the stage where she gets along fine, but starts to limp after extended periods of activity).

So...is there really anything substantial you can do about HD or is it just about slowing or lessening the onset of symptoms? We haven't found a supplement that really makes a big difference, though she can go for a little longer when on glucosamine/chondroitin than when she's not. Has anyone found a treatment that really makes a major impact? Does surgery really do anything? Acupuncture? A particular dietary or holistic approach? Or are we just stuck with lessening the exercise impact (as much as possible) and small qualitative differences with supplements?
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Ginger- M.I.A.

my first and- finest
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 12, '10 12:48pm PST 
I think that once the cartilage is gone and bony growths are forming in the joint (which is what happens with HD- the end result of abnormal wear) you can't get the cartilage back. It's not the dysplasia that causes pain, it's the arthritis caused by abnormal wear.

My ex-boyfriend's dog has unilateral HD- NOT congenital, probably caused by an injury during growth- and he's tried everything. Acupuncture, massage, seen lots of vets, and now he's just managing her with supplements and being careful about her exercise.

I would check out Leah's Pain Control thread for more info on management.
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Keiko

Where are you- going? Can I- come?
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 12, '10 2:07pm PST 
Ginger, that makes a lot of sense. I just hate that she has to be limited by something like this. confused She would've made an AMAZING agility dog, probably even done well at herding, could certainly have made a good running partner and loved all of it to bits...but instead she was born structurally unsound. Totally unfair.
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Luytiy

The way you can- go isn't the- real way.
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 12, '10 3:34pm PST 
Hi,

I'm kinda new here but I have some experience with HD...

Maybe this is obvious, but hip replacement surgery is the only real "fix" for a dog that already has HD. An FHO works ok in small dogs, but that's a salvage surgery and so it is never going to get the dog back to 100%. Hip replacement, on the other hand, can get the dog back to better than he ever was - a good hip replacement is "as good as new".

Some breed do better with HD than others. I met an 8 year old Ovcharka with severe HD and you would have never know, it didn't slow him down one bit, but in his case it was so severe there was no grinding of the ball (head) in the (hip) socket. He could jump a 6 foot fence with ease.

Then we have an Akita who developed severe HD at 6 months of age and it has grown worse with age, for him it was debilitating. He was clearly in pain and his quality of life was low. He had significant rubbing of the head and socket.

We have a little Shiba rescue too, she actually luxated her hip - it was horrible, and she was in a lot of pain. We did an FHO on her and now she is back to 90% of what she was - no pain, but she moves a little funny at times.

Anyway, my point is, if a dog is happy and having fun not showing significant signs of pain then I wouldn't do anything. When and if the times comes that it is debilitating then I would make a choice as to what to do. She could go well into her teens w/o significant pain or she could start showing pain soon. Either way the "fix" is the same - hip replacement. The "fix" is the same for severe or light HD and it all depends on how the quality of the dog's life.

IMHO, if she was gonna be slowed down by HD it would have been obvious at an early age. I'm no expert tho.
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Sassy

Princess and the- Pea
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 12, '10 7:45pm PST 
http://www.dogaware.com/health/arthritis.html

Keeping an arthritic dog lean and well exercised with good muscle mass really helps a lot of dogs. Have a comfy well cushioned bed for her. I threw a ball up a hill, had her walk through ladders and ground covers so she lifted up her feet, made her take her time going up stairs so the muscles got a work out. I am sure there are even better exercises to do, swimming might be really good. When I increased her protein intake she noticeably perked up and had an easier time getting around.
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Ginger- M.I.A.

my first and- finest
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 12, '10 11:19pm PST 
Hi Luytuy! (spelling fail probably smile ) I've seen you on your blog before! Welcome to Dogster! You sure are a pretty pup- not a lot of Ovcharkas here (none that I know of, actually).

Do you still have Kahuna the Akita with HD, or did he find a better home? He sounded so sweet despite all his pain.
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Luytiy

The way you can- go isn't the- real way.
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 13, '10 8:59am PST 
Hi Ginger - Thanks for the compliments of Luytiy. smile

As for Kahuna, yes we still have him here. He really has too many issues to place in a new home, so he will stick around here. Huna's HD has gotten pretty bad but he no longer appears to be in pain. He's constantly fighting various health issues so its been hard for us to find the right opportunity to do his hip replacement surgeries. Every time we schedule it one of his other health issues pops up and we have to push the surgery off. He's such a mess.

I agree with Sassy, keeping a dog with ortho issues lean is a great idea. We do that for Huna and his comfort has actually improved a bit.
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Harper

THROW THE BALL- MOM!
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 13, '10 9:31am PST 
I don't have experience to the extent that others have had.

We have a dog named Abby who has a weak hip, or so it seems. Glucosomine and chondroiten have made a difference for her.
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Luytiy

The way you can- go isn't the- real way.
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 13, '10 2:25pm PST 
Velvet Elk Antler is also a great thing to give a dog with ortho pain. We order from here: http://www.alpinevelvet.com/ Elk Antler is a environmentally friendly option too. Alpine velvet keep their elk on a huge pasture in Colorado, I've visited it personally. We give to Ahi, our Shikoku Ken who has bad knees and shoulder issues - it does wonders for her. Kaia (Shiba) too, for her back and her hip, Kai is like night and day off/on the stuff.
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Pepper

Got food? I- can be bought ya- know....
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 13, '10 3:12pm PST 
Don't you wish?
I wish the same for luxating patellas. Pepper had the first one done twicefrown
Her other knee is giving her trouble, but we can hardly bear to take her to the surgeon......poor baby.

Hey, Luytiy, Aren't you and your family a bit 'overdressed' for NM? Fur in that heat is sooooo over done hon. But in LA, you'd be stylin'

Until Sheryl Crow and PETA got to you.....
yeah, goof mood kicking in. Need chocolate.
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