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Another neuter myth?

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Bandit

i love the beach
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 6:20pm PST 
So I met a girl with her super cute husky pup just the other day. We were talking about his age (5 months) and how much he still has to grow (as he towered over Bandit who is full grown - haha). She said she was worried because he was getting neutered next month and she's been told that neutering a dog makes him grow MORE! ?! thinking

See, I'd heard about the notion that neutering a dog before he has fully matured (physically) can IMPEDE his growth, but not the other way around. And even then, there is still a lot of debate about the whole waiting-to-neuter topic.

I'm just curious, this is the first time I ever heard this theory. Bandit's already sans balls so it's not like it affects me personally. wink
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Colt

We were born- for this!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 6:29pm PST 
Myth.

You'd be surprised how many crazy neuter myths there are. For instance, did you know that neutering a male before he is fully grown will cause his front legs to grow longer than his back legs?
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Samson

Work? What's- that?
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 6:31pm PST 
In larger breeds neutering at a young age causes a higher rate of bone problems in later life to occur as some of the joints do not form properly without the presence of testosterone. I think most people recommend waiting until at least ten months before neutering a large breed of dog.

But causing them to grow more? I've never even heard that one. It doesn't stunt nor spur their growth, the only thing it can do is just cause incorrect bone growth, and I'm pretty sure that's not anything guaranteed, it's just more likely to happen than leaving them intact until closer to physical maturity.

Edited by author Mon Feb 8, '10 6:33pm PST

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Lincoln

I have no off- switch
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 6:45pm PST 
Its true, hormones is what tells the growth plates in the long bones to close. Without all the hormones they get thrown off. Its been proven that neutered dogs grow taller than unaltered alike breeds.

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpa yNeuterInDogs.pdf

http://www.stop-msn.com/dangers.html

http:// www.dogtorj.net/id79.html

http://www.luckydogs.info/pdf/Web_-_Spa ying_or_neutering_-_Pro_s_and_Con_s.pdf
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Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 6:51pm PST 
The hormones released in the body at sexual maturity cause the bones' growth plates to close. If a dog is neutered before that point, the growth plates don't close, and the bones continue to grow longer. The bones may not, however, because of this, gain the density they should gain, and the joints don't form quite as solidly as they should.

Small and medium breed dogs reach maturity early enough that speutering somewhere between six months and a year usually won't cause problems. Also, they're not putting as much of a burden on their bones and joints as large and giant breed dogs, so it's not as serious an issue.

Giant breed dogs may not reach full maturity until three years, and if they're speutered before that the consequences are more serious than for smaller dogs. The end result is a dog who is taller that it should have been, but not as filled out, and whose bones and joints are less solid than they should have been--a much more significant problem for an English mastiff than for a toy poodle.
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Josie

I\'m all ears!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 7:19pm PST 
Yes, dogs that are spayed/neutered at a young age (before sexual maturity) can cause them to grow bigger due to the effect of hormones on growth plates.

Josie was the same size at birth and at their measurements as puppies along the way as her sister (who went to the sire's owner and a friend of mine). Her sister was a conformation dog so remained unaltered, Josie was sold on a spay/neuter contract. Josie's final height ended up taller than her sister.

Edited by author Mon Feb 8, '10 7:25pm PST

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Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 8:16pm PST 
I don't know about dogs, but I have always heard that one should geld a horse before sexual maturity for safety and because the horse will be taller and lighter then he would have been if left a stallion. (This is considered a good thing in most horses)
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Howard

Tail Waggin'- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 8:48pm PST 
Here are some spay & neuter myths, and facts:
Myths:

Your dog will get fat. Some people think their female dogs will get fat after they get spayed. This is not true. Like any dog (or person!), if they don't get enough exercise or they eat too much, they may gain a little weight. If your dog eats a good diet and gets daily exercise, there is no reason for her to gain any weight after being spayed.



My dog will get lazy. Dogs do not get lazy or lose energy after being spayed or neutered. If anything, they become more interested in playing.


My dog won't feel like a boy, if he's neutered. Some men think that neutering a dog makes him less of a boy. They think the dog will feel this. But dogs don't thinks about things like this. Dogs don't know they have been neutered.


My dogs personality will change. There is no reason for a dog's personality to drastically change after being spayed or neutered. A male dog may become more friendly and interested in people because he isn't busy looking for a dog to mate with.

Spaying and neutering are dangerous operations. Spaying & neutering are done under general anesthetic. That means the dog is not aware of what's going on. Anytime a dog is under general anesthetic, there is a slight risk of injury or death. However, both spaying & neutering are simple operations. Most veterinarians have done this surgery hundreds or thousands of times. Giving birth and being pregnant and roaming and fighting are riskier that this surgery. Spaying & neutering also reduce the chance of some cancer.




Facts:

Your male dog won't roam as much. Neutered dogs are less likely to escape, and that's a good thing. Dogs who roam can get hit by cars, attacked by other animals, or stolen.


Your dog will be more loving. Now that they aren't driven to find another dog to mate with, many male dogs become more loving and more interested in interacting with people.

Your dog will be less likely to get cancer. Both female and male dogs have less risk of getting cancer in their reproductive organs after they get spayed or neutered.


Your dogs puppies won't be among the five million dogs euthanized each year. This is the best reason to get your dog spayed or neutered. Too many dogs are killed each year simply because they have no home. Even if you find good homes for your puppies, that means other puppies won't have homes. Be part of fixing the problem.



Sorry it was so long!
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Howard

Tail Waggin'- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 8:48pm PST 
Here are some spay & neuter myths, and facts:
Myths:

Your dog will get fat. Some people think their female dogs will get fat after they get spayed. This is not true. Like any dog (or person!), if they don't get enough exercise or they eat too much, they may gain a little weight. If your dog eats a good diet and gets daily exercise, there is no reason for her to gain any weight after being spayed.



My dog will get lazy. Dogs do not get lazy or lose energy after being spayed or neutered. If anything, they become more interested in playing.


My dog won't feel like a boy, if he's neutered. Some men think that neutering a dog makes him less of a boy. They think the dog will feel this. But dogs don't thinks about things like this. Dogs don't know they have been neutered.


My dogs personality will change. There is no reason for a dog's personality to drastically change after being spayed or neutered. A male dog may become more friendly and interested in people because he isn't busy looking for a dog to mate with.

Spaying and neutering are dangerous operations. Spaying & neutering are done under general anesthetic. That means the dog is not aware of what's going on. Anytime a dog is under general anesthetic, there is a slight risk of injury or death. However, both spaying & neutering are simple operations. Most veterinarians have done this surgery hundreds or thousands of times. Giving birth and being pregnant and roaming and fighting are riskier that this surgery. Spaying & neutering also reduce the chance of some cancer.




Facts:

Your male dog won't roam as much. Neutered dogs are less likely to escape, and that's a good thing. Dogs who roam can get hit by cars, attacked by other animals, or stolen.


Your dog will be more loving. Now that they aren't driven to find another dog to mate with, many male dogs become more loving and more interested in interacting with people.

Your dog will be less likely to get cancer. Both female and male dogs have less risk of getting cancer in their reproductive organs after they get spayed or neutered.


Your dogs puppies won't be among the five million dogs euthanized each year. This is the best reason to get your dog spayed or neutered. Too many dogs are killed each year simply because they have no home. Even if you find good homes for your puppies, that means other puppies won't have homes. Be part of fixing the problem.



Sorry it was so long!
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Daegan

Roll down the- window!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 8, '10 10:22pm PST 
Your dogs puppies won't be among the five million dogs euthanized each year. This is the best reason to get your dog spayed or neutered. Too many dogs are killed each year simply because they have no home. Even if you find good homes for your puppies, that means other puppies won't have homes. Be part of fixing the problem.

applauseapplauseapplauseapplauseapplauseapplause

As for the getting lazy part, no, they won't get lazy, but they will calm down some- or they should. After we got our late lab/border collie mix neutered many years ago, he calmed down a LOT. He was SO good after that.

Edited by author Mon Feb 8, '10 10:23pm PST

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