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Animal digest in probiotic

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Abby

1087348
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 10:16am PST 
So on my quest to figure out Abby's itching and black armpits my doctor prescribes an antibiotic and a medicated shampoo. She had signs of infection in the groan area and armpits.

She also had a yeast infection in her vulva. The doctor told me I should spray the area with white vinegar/water. This hurts her, so I'm not able to continue that treatment.

I asked her about probiotics. She's not sold on the idea because she said each dog reacts so differently to them. However, she recommended I give her the kind they have--fortiflora ($43).

Also, I'm trying to limit Abby's diet to figure out her allergies. She is only on Acana Pacifica, treats are her kibble or same ingredients as her kibble.

After giving her a dose of the probiotic, I noticed the company was Purina. This alarmed me and I had a look at the ingredients. The number 1 ingredient is animal digest. Isn't this bad for dogs?!! Especially for a dog on an all fish allergy trial. Salt is also an ingredient.

I called my vet to discuss this with her. I hope she will refund my money.

What do you all think? Is it ok for the main ingredient in a probiotic to be animal digest?

(sorry for the long disjointed post!)
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Daddy

Changing one- mind at a time - APBT style
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 10:45am PST 
Animal digest is a terrible ingredient. Not being from a specified source means it could be any type of animal from road kill to euthanized shelter pets. Animal digest is also generally comprised of 4D diseased or dying animals that are unfit for human consumption. I would avoid that brand, and any Purina product like the plague. If you're looking for probiotics, a good brand is Pet Guard probiotic and digestive enzyme supplement, it's all human grade ingredients and doesn't contain anything like animal digest, wheat, soy, corn, byproducts, or sugar.

How big is that bottle for $43, that's insane; especially for the poor quality of it!

Edited by author Sun Jan 31, '10 10:46am PST

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Abby

1087348
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 10:58am PST 
I'm really upset at myself for blindly following my vet's orders before checking out the ingredients.

It was the Purina label that alerted me to check it out. It has 30 sachets in it.
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*Isabella- Blu Heart*

Don\\\'t drink- the CLIQUE- KOOL-AID!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 10:59am PST 
Hi Abbywave
I'm a firm believer in the holistic approach. Here is a site with some answers to your questions.
http://www.earthclinic.com/Pets/yeast_infections_dogs.html#ACIDOPH ILUS
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Daddy

Changing one- mind at a time - APBT style
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 12:46pm PST 
I'm sorry Abby, but whatever you do don't blame yourself or be too upset. I too trusted vets before when it came to diet and nutrition, and it completely ruined Daddy's coat (I think he has corn product allergies and/or soy allergies and of course I wasn't told until I looked online that these things aren't good for dogs), I thought all vets were also nutrition experts. Unfortunately many aren't, and a LOT of the clinics are taught in nutrition and sponsored by the big name pet food companies like Purina, Hill's and Iams. Some vets can actually lose their jobs if they don't promote the foods the companies that are sponsoring them provide them.

If you can find a Holistic veterinarian or clinic anywhere nearby, I would suggest going that route. Especially if your dog is experiencing health problems that will have vets pushing a "special/veterinary diet" on you. I learned this one the hard way.

Edited by author Sun Jan 31, '10 12:48pm PST

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Moochi

1030485
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 12:55pm PST 
I buy human grade probiotic for my dog and me. I think it is much better than pet grade probiotic. I get mine from a company called Nature's Sunshine. A bottle of probiotic cost me $22. You can also get it at your local health food store.
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Moochi

1030485
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 1:01pm PST 
I buy human grade probiotic for my dog and me. I think it is much better than pet grade probiotic. I get mine from a company called Nature's Sunshine. A bottle of probiotic cost me $22. You can also get it at your local health food store.
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Lily

Whose bed?? Why- would YOU think- that?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 5:19pm PST 
Human grade here. Solaray Multidophilus - $29 for 180 @ 2 a day for an adult human. Just refrigerated 20 billion little organisms with very little carrier.

Animal digest is the contents of a dog's digestive system. Purina is known to use it all, so you possibly are feeding your dog other dog's feces. Yuck - cooked or not.

WalMart has Enzymatic Therapy's Pearls. They do not need to be in the fridge. $10-$12 for 30 days.

I used human athlete's foot cream on my previous dog's skin lesions (legs and in the joint area.) Try that on the underarms. For the tender vaginal area, you might want some cream especially for that area.

Sasha wasa better in two days and clear in much less than a week. Nothing ever returned.
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Abby

1087348
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 7:03pm PST 
I ended up buying Animal Essentials Plant Enzymes and Probiotics. It seems to get favorable reviews on here and on the Internet in general.

I was all gung ho about giving her people probiotics, until my vet scared me off from doing so. She said she attended a lecture that warned against it, saying dog's digestive systems are way different than people's and should be treated differently. However, the same vet prescribed animal digest!

I hope my vet refunds me!
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Daddy

Changing one- mind at a time - APBT style
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 31, '10 7:32pm PST 
I feed a pet digestive enzyme/probiotic blend because it uses human grade ingredients and is a lot easier for me to find that human probiotics. The human ones I've found are just acidophilus and are quite expensive, something like $40 for a month's worth, so us people don't get probiotics unless they happen to be in any yogurt we eat. I also give the probiotics I do to the dogs because they also contain digestive enzymes as well.

Edited by author Sun Jan 31, '10 7:33pm PST

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