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Horse Wormers Used For Dogs?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Sike

Brilliant- Mastermind
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 28, '09 10:08am PST 
I was talking with a rescue lady today, and she informed me she wormed her dogs with a horse wormer Ivomectrin diluted. I was not aware of this. I DO know Collie breeds like mine are intolerant to Ivomectrin, but she said the horse versions of Panacur and Strongid also works. Does anyone have input or experience using this type of worming with their dogs?
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Gir

All that lives- is holy.
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 28, '09 1:55pm PST 
Collies are sensitive to Ivermectin in that their seizure threshold is at 100x the maximum effective dose rather than at 500-600x the recommended dose, which is where most breeds reach the seizure threshold, to clarify for lurkers.

I believe the dose of ivermectin is 91 micrograms/kilogram for a dog. I think there are 251 micrograms per gram in most Ivermectin-based horse deowormers. Quite a few people I know use horse wormers for dogs, but you need to be very specific about the dose. If you're not excellent at math, don't try it. (And remember that since it's a violation of federal law to use the product in a manner inconsistent with its packaging, if you do use it, you should probably not tell a lot of people).
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quigley

wigley- quigley,the- quigster
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 28, '09 1:59pm PST 
My vet gave me horse wormer for my great danes! Never seemed to do the same job as dog wormer but the vet said it was as effective. dog
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Tanuk CGC

Sherpa Tanuk of- Everest
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 28, '09 3:31pm PST 
I do know that my vet uses a horse worming medicine for coccidia. We used it for Tanuk, just a smaller dose, and it worked like a charm. Cannot for the life of me remember what it was called though.
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Chandler

Code name:- Farmcollie
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 28, '09 3:45pm PST 
Here's a website from Cornell about it.
Shelters do it sometimes to be more cost effective.

Please note that dosages must be calculated carefully,
and you should NEVER try this with any dog that might have the MDR1 mutation. It might kill them.

Heck, eating sheep poop after the sheep have been wormed is dangerous for an MDR1 mutation dog. frown
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Sike

Brilliant- Mastermind
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 28, '09 8:07pm PST 
I have the Safe Guard wormer, which is suspensively equivalent to Panacur? I heard Strongid horse wormer if OK to use too? I would NEVER use Ivermectin on my Border Collies!
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Chandler

Code name:- Farmcollie
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 28, '09 8:44pm PST 
It's not just ivermectin that can cause a bad reaction in MDR1 mutant dogs. (Although supposedly border collies do not have that mutation. If they are sensitive to certain drugs, it may be from a different one.)

Here is the list:
http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts-VCPL/drugs.aspx

Edit: correction, according to new information on the Washington State University page, less than 5% of border collies have the mutation.

Edited by author Mon Sep 28, '09 8:48pm PST

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Sike

Brilliant- Mastermind
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 29, '09 10:31am PST 
Thanks Chandler! According to my breeder and the rescue I used to work with, Border Collies shouldn't even get around Ivermectin? thinking The good thing is fenbenzole (sp?) is NOT on this list! Fenbenzole (Safe Guard) is supposedly the same Panacur wormer form dogs. I also have heard horse Strongid T is okay for the use in dogs. My friend who works in German Shepherd Rescue, is supposed to show me how to dilute it tonight.

Edited by author Tue Sep 29, '09 10:45am PST

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Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 29, '09 1:31pm PST 
Hi, it is the same chemical as some dog wormers. The problem is figuring out the dosages. Ivermectin is given in micrograms. Even a big dog will only take something like a tenth of a cc. It is really easy to overdose or get the wrong dose.

Our vet will mix an ivermectin for dogs and provide the dosage for people who cannot afford regular wormer. The other horse wormers are easier to use, but it is better to use a dog wormer, again to make sure you are getting an effective dose.

If you overdose your dogs, you could kill them and some dogs are sensitive to particular classes of chemicals. A good vet will work with you to make sure you can take care of your dog without going broke in the process.
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Lilith

I'm a trilingual- dog!
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 29, '09 1:35pm PST 
Along with what everyone else said - the dosages differ only by milligrams. Unless you have a scientific weight that recalibrates itself, a few milligrams is very easy to not get right.

True, but sad story -

A friend's friend's parents brought a dog and took it to the vet. This was in rural China. The vet didn't carry dewormer for dogs, but just told them to go to the feedlot and get some livestock dewormer.

Well, they got the dosage wrong. The little puppy never stood a chance. It crawled under a cabinet a few hours after overdosing on dewormer and died under there a day later crying.

If I'd known this person personally I'd have hit him over the head.. sigh. So long story short, be very careful, and always consult a vet if you're not sure. Especially when the difference is so small that you'd need a scale found in labs to get it just right.

Edited by author Tue Sep 29, '09 1:36pm PST

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