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home remedies for flea/tick prevention?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Abby

Being sassy is- my profession.
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 8:28am PST 
Hey guys! I've heard about home remedies to prevent fleas, such as apple cider vinegar in their water, etc. Are these effective? Does it depend on the dog and where you live? I would love to look into some of these methods.
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Midnight- Star

Go Figure!
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 8:31am PST 
I heard something about garlic, too - but I'm going to be following this thread closely. There just HAS to be a more natural way to deter those pesky critters!
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Midnight- Star

Go Figure!
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 8:51am PST 
I heard something about garlic, too - but I'm going to be following this thread closely. There just HAS to be a more natural way to deter those pesky critters!
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Beta

What...What?
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 9:09am PST 
shrugI was hoping someone would provide some info on this subject. I too have wondered this same thing. I heard about garlic but not how to administer it (ie: powder, crushed, pill form).
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Buddy

Giving my paw- can get me- anything!
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 9:09am PST 
I think it depends on the severity of fleas in your area and the health of your dog. I personally have tried the garlic and apple cider vinegar but in Florida fleas are around every corner. We are looking into a new place and I am going to give all these a try again in a fresh new place. I'm gonna buy Diatomaceous earth and sprinkle it everywhere and add apple cider vinegar to the water. I'm sort of afraid to use garlic again because of the toxicity of it. You can also try borax on your carpets. When you vacuum, put a chopped up flea collar in your vacuum bag so the fleas die in there. You can also make different kinds of oil and citrus sprays.

Found this:

Natural Ways for Getting Rid of Dog Fleas
If you're leery of using chemical products on your dog or home, there are a number of plant-, vitamin-, and herbal-based natural flea treatments available. Adding garlic or brewer's yeast to a dog's food has long been thought to help keep fleas from alighting and biting. Since both are ordinary food products and not harmful to dogs, there's really nothing to lose by giving them a try. Herbal flea collars and powders are also popular and widely available.

Eucalyptus, fennel, rosemary, rue, wormwood, and yellow dock all seem to act as flea repellents. To make your own herbal flea powder, combine equal amounts of these herbs and mix them well. Sprinkle a small amount of the powder on your dog's coat and massage it in thoroughly, making sure to work it all the way down to the skin. You can also use a drop or two of the essential oils of eucalyptus and rosemary on a plain canvas or fabric-covered collar.

As with any flea collar, though, watch for signs of hair loss or skin irritation around the neck, and be careful that the dog doesn't chew on the collar. You can also buy ready-made herbal flea collars at pet supply and natural food stores.

And:

Natural Repellents and Dips

Use a mixture of Avon Skin-So-Soft, vinegar, and eucalyptus oil as a bug repellent for humans and animals.

Natural flea and tick dip:

2 cups, packed, of fresh rosemary and/or peppermint
1 quart boiling water
4 quarts warm water

Pour the just boiled water over the fresh herbs and let steep, covered, for 30 minutes. Strain and add the liquid to the 4 quarts of warm water and then saturate the animal. Let it air dry.

Flea Spray

spray her with an herbal mixture of:
chamomile
valerian
licorice
witch hazel

Prepare an infusion using one tea bag of each herb, and when it's cold, mix it with witch hazel.

Plants:

Densely grow fennel and basil around the pet area and place some of the fresh herbs in and around their homes (inside their beds, on the floor, etc.).

That's about all I could find. I need to do some research also because I will have to learn how to keep the fleas in check in this new house!
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Abby

Being sassy is- my profession.
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 9:41am PST 
eek WOW thanks, Buddy!!

I'm going to give some of these a try. This will be our first Spring/Summer with Abby, but I don't think fleas will be TOO much of a problem where I live (southeastern Michigan), so I would rather not use chemicals and stuff if it's possible.
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Buddy

Giving my paw- can get me- anything!
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 10:24am PST 
laugh out loud No problem!
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Kodi Pie - CGC ESA

Why sit when you- could lie down?
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 10:35am PST 
I have also read that adding the AVC to the water helps but that taking a 1:1 ratio suitable for your dogs size and squirting it into their mouth via...ah crap..brain fart...medical instument for giving medicine minus the needle. By squirting it directly into their mouth you have a better idea of how much they are getting.

ETA: I meant syringe.... Of course I remembered once I posted.

I dont know about you guys but my dog rarely finishes his entire bowl of water.

Also, keeping a spray bottle with 1:1 ACV and Water on hand for when you think you will go somewhere where you will encounter fleas and tick. Spray them down before you go out and whenyou come back. It sould help kill off anything you picked up.

Edited by author Tue Mar 4, '08 10:36am PST

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Jin

I'm going with- you, right?
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '08 1:57pm PST 
Brewer’s yeast is another good repellent, and, like garlic, can be added to your dog’s food. For what I have at hand the dosage I’ve found for Brewer’s yeast is 25 mgs per 10 lbs of body weight daily. As regards garlic, I’ve found a recommendation of a clove or two chopped or grated into each meal and in another book a clove or two (or more depending on the dog’s size and, due to the smell of garlic, on your tolerance) a day. The second book mentions Kyolic garlic being “unlikely to cause stomach upsets when fed in large amounts compared to raw garlic.”

With garlic, however, keep in mind that different dogs have different tolerances, the best indicator of tolerance being their stool.

Probably any of these methods could be picked and choosed and mixed and matched depending on individuals. But it’s certainly interesting to see the different home remedies that are out there, that’s for sure. smile

For anyone interested, my sources for the “dosages” were, in order of their mention (and as appears on the books' covers):

How to Have a Healthier Dog: The Benefits of Vitamins and Minerals for Your Dog’s Life Cycles by Wendell O. Belfield, D.V.M. and Martin Zucker

The Nature of Animal Healing: The Path to Your Pet’s Health, Happiness, and Longevity by Martin Goldstein, D.V.M.

Give Your Dog a Bone: The Practical Commonsense Way to Feed Dogs For a Long Healthy Life by Dr. Ian Billinghurst, B.V.Sc.[Hons], B.Sc.Agr.,Dip.Ed.
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Dixie

Worst Dog to- piss off
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 9, '08 7:51am PST 
My Dixie has fleas again too and i was told to give her Garlic pills and or chopped garlic clove in with lunchmeat.. i know from previous experience.. she came down with worms when she was preg in 2006 and delivered 6 puppies all came out smelling like garlic but none of them had worms so use garlic cloves as a de-wormer.
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