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Discharge From Eyes

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Lassie-Miss- ing Your- Smile

Devil in Heaven
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '08 5:40pm PST 
Lassie currently has green discharge coming from her eyes. I clean it with salt water everytime I see the discharge, but an hour later, it just comes back. I've tried just wiping the goo off, and I've tried getting closer into the eye to get it out, and I've tried going to the bone area, just massaging it, then pulling it down across the socket. It still just keeps coming back every time.
If it helps, Lassie is an Austalian Cattle Dog cross Boxer, with Staffordshire Bull Terrier, and Rodeshian Ridgeback.
Any suggestions? And, by the way, when I clean Lassie's eyes, I use make-up removal pads, one for each eye.
Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you!hug
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buster

my family- adopted me!!- think about it!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '08 5:46pm PST 
i asked my vet about clear discharge brom busters eyes and she said not to worry unless it wasnt clear anymore, i would call the vet... i hope its nothing serious
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Uno

I'm huntin'- wabbits
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '08 8:10pm PST 
Salt? wouldnt that irritate the eyes further? Use herbal tea instead (warm or cool). The only thing that comes to mind is food sensitivities, possibly other allergies, like airborne. If its food, corn, wheat or soy is a likely culprit, those are the most common allergens, but often dogs develop sensitivities to dyes and artificial preservaties as well.Also avoid people food, eye discharge is often a way for dogs to expless toxins from their bodies, including excess salt.

Edited by author Thu Jan 24, '08 8:11pm PST

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Sedona

The Wise Cracker
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '08 11:49pm PST 
http://home.ivillage.com/pets/symsolve/0,,j8qm,00.html

Thick yellow-green discharge could mean an infection, either an eye infection or a viral infection. Discharge due to allergy is typically clear.

We are getting over an eye problem. The vet said it was an allergic reaction (swollen lids, bloodshot eyes, very watery, no discharge). I'd say take the pup to the vet. It's better to be safe. It could just be a hair caught in the conjunctiva that's causing irratation. Something simple like that, if left untreated, could cause blindness due to infection.
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~Sophie~

I also answer to- 'Pretty Girl'
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '08 6:28am PST 
Yeah the green sounds like an infection. The vet will give you eye drops and/or an antiobiotic.

Also to clean, my vet always says to just use a warm clean washcloth. I'm not sure what's on makeup removal pads but I'm sure there are some chemicals.
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Gunner

I solemnly swear- that I am up to- no good
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '08 7:32am PST 
Green or yellow discharge or crusties are the signals of an eye infection. Definately get your dog to the vet ASAP, eye infections aren't comfortable at all! smile
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Lassie-Miss- ing Your- Smile

Devil in Heaven
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '08 4:16pm PST 
Thank you everyone! We will be going to the vet in Feb, for Lassie's vaccinations, is that a bit too late? And also something I forgot to say, was that Lassie was recently at the local boarding kennels, so maybe she caught it from there?
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Gunner

I solemnly swear- that I am up to- no good
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '08 5:41pm PST 
Feburary isn't that far off, but is it possible to get your dog in earlier?

If not, you can try buying eye wipes from your local petstore (ones without alcohol, non-irritating kind) and wipe down her eyes morning, night, and when she goes outside.

I don't know about getting an eye infection from a kennel, but it does sound possible. Gunner gets his eye infections from being in a dusty area frown I guess being 11 inches from the ground in a desert is tough!
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Lassie-Miss- ing Your- Smile

Devil in Heaven
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 26, '08 10:46pm PST 
Sure thing Gunner. We're going to be booking her in on Tuesday. I always wipe Lassie's eyes whenever I see the green goo, is that too frequent?
And Lassie is an outside dog, so maybe that could relate to the problem? Although, Cherry is also an outside dog, and she doesn't seem to have any problems with her eyes.
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Thor

Hump Hump
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 27, '08 5:08am PST 
Hi Lassie , for just normal eye cleaning , we use "Hypo Tears"/Lubricant eye drops /(over the counter) and they are safe for all dogs and humans , may I suggest,, dropping using salt to clear the eye . Here is something from a web site about discharge from eye, I hope it helps ...good luck
Thor way to go
Eye Discharge

Overview

Eye discharge is a common sign of eye disease. Abnormal discharge may develop suddenly or gradually. The discharge may be watery, mucoid (gray, ropy), mucopurulent (yellow-green, thickened) or bloody. In general, the more discharge present, the more serious the disease.

It is common for eye discharge to be associated with other symptoms such as pain, squinting, redness or rubbing at the eye.


There are numerous causes of eye discharge including a blocked tear duct, conjunctivitis, eyelid abnormalities, corneal ulcers, glaucoma, inflammation within the eye, trauma or dry eye.


Diagnosis and Treatment Notes:


Eye discharge is typically diagnosed through history and complete eye examination. The cause of the discharge generally requires further testing such as Schirmer tear test, fluorescein corneal staining, and measuring eye pressure. Additional tests such as cytology (examining cells under a microscope), bacterial or fungal culture, bloodwork, head x-rays or even CT or MRI may also be recommended.


Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the discharge, your individual pet, and your veterinarian. Treatment may include topical eye medication, oral medication such as antibiotics and/or steroids or even surgery. Discuss treatment details when your pet is evaluated and the underlying condition causing the eye discharge is diagnosed.


What to Watch for*:

Rubbing or scratching at eyes
Eye redness
Squinting
Light sensitivity
Swelling around the eyes
Continued eye discharge
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