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Dewclaws on rear paws

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Daisy - R.I.P.

Good Morning- Beautiful.
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '07 7:34am PST 
Some dogs are born with and without. Some have double and some have single. Some will go their whole lives with no problems while others have to have them removed.
Just weigh the pros and cons ( unless there is an injury ).
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Kitai

Chia Kitai!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '07 7:48am PST 
Yeah I agree Daisy. If Kotaro had ever developed a problem with his extra thumbs I would have seriously considered removal. But we were lucky and never had to face a problem like that.
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Lucyy!?!!- =]]

So much cooler- than yerr mom :]
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '07 12:32pm PST 
Lucy still had her dewclaws as they were never removed. She really has no problem with them except it sometimes gets stuck in her sweater when I put it on for walks (hehe) but that's really it. I would only consider taking them off if a) the got caught on things b) she was in discomfort or c) she was a working dog. But none of them apply to her. Personally I would only have them removed when she was a little puppy, now it would be too hard to stop her from walking/running intil it healed laugh out loud I think it is a great thing to have done so nothing happens though big grin
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Snowfoot sled dog team

Oldies but- goodies
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '07 12:56pm PST 
Allot of my dogs were born without dews, some had just a tiny vestigal (sp?) dewclaw that had no bone. Mine are also removed because like Kristen's Fuzzy Huskies, they are working dogs. Deeper snow with a hard crust is particularily tough on dews. I would say a pet would not need them removed tho.
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Sirius- Padfoot- Black

Too clever for- Mom's own good!- :)
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '07 1:05pm PST 
Both of Siri's brothers, Tykir and Kadjii, had floppy dews, and when they have their neuters, the vet will probably remove them, being floppy as they are, so they don't get caught on something and rip off. I was lucky. Siri was born without dews on the hind paws, so we don't have to worry about them. big grin
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Kip

I'm a Maniac!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '07 5:01pm PST 
I would say get them removed. They can and do cause problems. My sister in laws Collie had hers and it actually started growing weird and started into her skin! You could tell it was painful for the pup because she would limp around... Kip and Joy both have theirs out and I believe they are better off without them.

Less likely to rip off and cause major pain and problems.
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Kip

I'm a Maniac!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '07 5:01pm PST 
double post

Edited by author Mon Nov 5, '07 5:02pm PST

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Sparkle

You may refer to- me as "her- ladyship!"
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 6, '07 6:08am PST 
In rereading early posts I'm surprised at one post stating thatt dewclaws reach the ground and get wear????? and that they affect the dogs ability to turn etc.
I wonder if there's some confusion on the definition of "dewclaw" and wonder if we're all referring to the same thing.
In my experience, the dewclaw is on the dogs' WRIST, above the foot.. In 17 years of grooming, and over 35 years of dog ownership, I have NEVER seen a dog with dewclaws that receive wear with the rest of the foot... even in horribly neglected dogs with badly overgrown nails, coat, etc. etc.
They survive from the original canine who looked nothing at all like our present dog, had 5 toes and was fairly short legged. As the dog evolved, it no longer required 5 toes... but that extra one is still part of the "genetic programme".
As other posters had indicated, MANY dogs are born without them........and have no mobility issues whatsoever. Indeed, a good number of successful agility dogs where either born without them, or had them removed as pups... Most breeders will remove them before the age of 3 days when a puppies pain receptors aren't yet fully developed.
Not a big deal perhaps, but on a learning forum, I'd be concerned about "newbies" being misinformed.... unless, of course, *I'm* the one who's confused (it wouldn't be the first time.)
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Boston

King of- everything
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 6, '07 9:41am PST 
I work at a vet clinic as a groomer and I have seen alot of dogs come in having problems with the dewclaws. As a groomer also I have dealt with a few that grew right into the leg and got infected. Its nice to get them removed while the dog is getting spayed or neutered though. If its to late for that I would leave them if you dont see any troble with them in the future.
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Sparkle

You may refer to- me as "her- ladyship!"
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 6, '07 11:30am PST 
I find that the worst ones for "ingrown dewclaws" are usually smaller breeds and almost always long coated breeds. I think some owners are simply not aware these nails exist and, if the owner doesn't maintain the coat regularly there's an even greater chance the dewclaws will go unnoticed.
BeCAUSE they don't get any wear, they tend to grow quickly and in dogs with a tightly curled nail, the owner really does need to stay on top of things to avoid a painful situation for the dog.
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