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Dangerous Drug Warning PREVICOX

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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In Memory of- Jack

I am the- Honeybee
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 13, '06 8:33am PST 
Anyone who is interested in researching the veterinary NSAIDs such as Previcox, Metacam, Rimadyl, Zubrin, Deramaxx, Etogesic, etc. please visit my web page at http://www.veterinarydruginfo.com. I am a survivor of an adverse reaction to Rimadyl and my Mom designed this page to help others find the information they need to make an informed decision about the use of these drugs. Anyone who wants to see how many deaths have been ruled by the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine to be possibly, probably, or definitely related to Previcox since its approval can go the the FDA CVM website and do so by viewing the Cumulative Adverse Drug Event Report. How to do this is explained, and there are links to other sources of information such as a very good article by the FDA about minimizing the risk factors of the veterinary NSAID drugs. Because the veterinary NSAID class of drugs leads all others in the number of adverse events reported to the FDA, it is a very good idea to learn all one can about using them as safely as possible. Please be careful when switching from one NSAID to another, or from aspirin or a corticosteroid such as prednisone to a NSAID. A washout period should be observed between the drugs. For example, some of the Previcox deaths have been ruled by FDA CVM to be possible drug interactions between Rimadyl and Previcox, when dogs were switched from Rimadyl to Previcox without a long enough washout period. I think that veterinarians tend sometimes to view statistics presented by the drug companies that these drugs carry very little serious risk and therefore minimize or fail to pass along the very real risks to the pet guardian. I can tell you that when it is your dog that becomes very sick or dies that you could care less that this was supposedly a rare event. When a drug is given to millions and millions of dogs, such as Rimadyl has been, one must keep in mind that even small percentages of deaths can add up to large numbers of dogs. The use of these drugs should never be taken lightly no matter how many dogs have taken them without ill effect. It is up to each person to weigh benefit and risk against the seriousness of their dog's condition and the available alternatives, and if a NSAID is the chosen course of treatment to follow recommended safety guidelines such as prescreening bloodwork and periodic monitoring, to observe the animal carefully, and discontinue the drug at any sign of intolerance. Doing your homework could enable you to save your dog's life. Blind trust in a veterinarian will not.
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Oreo

Oreo - It takes work to- sleep this much!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 13, '06 5:39pm PST 
Wow, well said! Too many people take whatever a Vet or an MD says as absolute truth, failing to remember that these are HUMAN beings, not infalliable super-beings. People make mistakes, Vets and MDs are not all-knowing, and it is every single person's responsibility to make informed decisions about their pet's health as well as their own.
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