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Is Scotch Guard toxic?

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Sammy

I love and miss- you Dutchess
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 17, '05 6:21am PST 
We just ordered a new couch and had it scotch guarded. Then I started thinking that, what if it's toxic. Sammy is always on the couch. Does anyone know? Maybe it's not too late to cancel.
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Member Since
12/31/1969
Other posts by this user
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 17, '05 7:11am PST 
Are they using the 3M Scotchgard stuff? The website states that it isn't available "on furniture purchased at the retailer." I would check the type of product that is being put on the couch.

www.3m.com/us/home_leisure/scotchgard/furniture.jhtml

This is the MSDS (material safety data sheet) for the upholstry product they sell:

http://multimedia.mmm.com/mws/mediawebserver.dyn?ZZZZZZt9WD teSd_4_Gxz6ggDnJMZsd_zg1_ZVFl--

I don't think it's 'toxic' per se, but could cause skin irriation.
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Sammy

I love and miss- you Dutchess
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 17, '05 8:02am PST 
Thanks Ginger. I cound't open the second link. But I looked on my reciept and the product they use is called Guardsman. I went on their website and the fabric protector they sell said it contains no perfluorooctanyl sulphonates (PFOS) or perfluorooctanic acid (PFOA). I don't really know what that means, and I don't really know it that's the same stuff they'll use.

I worry about stupid stuff like this when it comes to Sammy. I don't know if I should just tell them not to do it or just let it go. It may even be too late. Always something to worry about!
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Member Since
12/31/1969
Other posts by this user
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 17, '05 8:52am PST 
I don't put anything on my carpets or sofas, and try and only use cleaners that use natural stuff. Dogs can have long term reactions/effects to things like that, mostly because they are in constant skin contact with it - laying on carpet, sofas, and even stuff you put on wood, tiles, etc. But that's just me...to each his/her own! =)
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Sammy

I love and miss- you Dutchess
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 17, '05 6:45pm PST 
Thanks again Ginger. I was able to cancel it. I'm so relieved. But I started thinking about when we get the capets cleaned. We have it done like twice a year because they are very light. That's the end of that!
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Snowy

A Doggie Scholar
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 17, '05 6:54pm PST 
Sammy,

Here's my somewhat logical guess - I think scotch guard is nontoxic. It came with my carpet cleaner as one of those after-cleaning treatment formula. If the stuff can be applied on household carpets, I doubt they are toxic. If you are not convinced, I can check out the ingredients when I get home.
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Sabrina- 2000~2012

To break- injustice we- must break- silence
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 17, '05 7:08pm PST 
You know how many human babies get sick from carpet cleaning stuff and other household cleaning supply residue (even after you've mopped it/vacuumed it/wiped it up)? It's a lot!

I figure anything people wouldn't use when there's a baby crawling around on the floor also isn't safe to use if you have pets.

In our house we have mostly Seventh Generation brand cleansers. We use a mint oil ant spray to help control our ant problem at the start of the rainy season. We also use Nature's Miracle for all carpet stains (including chocolate jello powder, red wine and sangria). The only non-safe cleanser in our house is Clorox Teflon shower cleaner which we apply to the shower right before dying our hair. We don't mind a pink/blue/orange or whatever shower, but our landlord probably would. We hate using it but we also can't afford to have the shower refinished when we move.

Glad you were able to cancel the scotch guarding!
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Snowy

A Doggie Scholar
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 18, '05 4:30am PST 
Sabrina,

Just because babies get sick from carpet cleaning products, that doesn't mean that all of those products are "toxic." Toxic strictly means that it will 'kill' a living being if sufficient amounts are ingested or otherwise absorbed through the system.

Most household products are non-toxic. These products do not preclude you from getting sick (example: causing vomiting, diarrhea, nausea when ingested; causing skin or eye irritation on contact; causing nausea, coughing, temporary difficulty in breathing if inhaled).

In the end, the decision to reject scotchguard option was probably a wise one smile
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Leeloo

Multipass!
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 23, '05 5:14pm PST 
I agree with Snowy. For one thing, we can't afford Seventh Generation or actually, any of the 'organic' stuff one teachers' salaries. For another, we found out from the vet that just as many things made from organic materials cause allergies and reactions as do chemicals. For example, it's VERY rare for someone to be allergic to plastic (less than 20 people), yet how many people are allergic to peanuts? I've had kids in class who COULD have been killed easily by peanuts-making them 'toxic'.

We use Arm & Hammer Baking Soda for the carpet and the carpet and couch are Scotch Guarded. Leeloo has allergies to some types of grass that cause her to scratch. Actually, she really likes it when I Febreze stuff. big grin
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Sabrina- 2000~2012

To break- injustice we- must break- silence
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 23, '05 5:31pm PST 
Leeloo, it's all in what your priorities are... hubby and I are both graduate students. We make combined less than $30,000 a year. We support 6 animals (one dog, two cats, two guinea pigs and a gecko) and live in one of the most expensive places in the united states. Rent for a 450 square foot place is $1,175 a month including water, just to give you an idea. Our priority is health (probably because I am also ill and take three meds daily, adding to our monthly expenses). We have decided to eat organic food (or at least pesitcide free) and feed our animals Innova Evo. We buy cage free eggs and hormone free milk. We buy seventh generation and other such cleansers. Yes, we've given up a lot for this. We rarely go out to eat. We haven't been to see a movie in years. My newest clothes are hand-me-downs from my sister that I got 6 months ago. We cut our own hair. So the question is more of what you choose to spend money on. It's fine to me that you choose to save money and purchase conventional products, it's just I think everyone should know about the differences between conventional and natural cleansers so they can make their own choice.

Yes, you're correct natural things cause allergies. However, there are far more chemicals in conventional cleaners than there are natural things in seventh generation and the like. So you have a greater chance of being exposed to an allergen simply by virtue of numbers of things in the product. In addition, if you're concerned about allergies, you can always read the label of the product. Most natural products are based on citrus oils or mint oils in my experience, so if you're fine with those things, you're probably fine with the natural cleaners.

My point isn't so much on the allergy side as the build up of toxic chemicals (you refered to peanuts as toxic, however peanuts are an allergy that is toxic only to those allergic so I'm not considering peanuts here). Chemicals can enter your dog's bloodstream by passing through their paws and also by them eating them. A chemical might accumulate in your dog if they can't metabolize it, leading to a higher and higher concentration of that particular chemical in your dog's blood. The higher the concentration, the more likely it is that the dog will have some bad effects, be it simply feeling bad or having a severe reaction or getting cancer.

Personally, I choose not to take the risk-- with my body or my pets. I fully understand that other people view this issue differently and might have other priorities in their lives. That is fine with me... I am just trying to get the information out there. If someone hadn't told me about it, I never would have known, after all!

Edited to add: Snowy, with your definiton of non-toxic things still causing nausea, diareah, vomiting etc I still wouldn't want to use them! I don't care what it's called... if it can hurt me or my pets then I will think twice about using it!
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