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The most challenging breed?

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 2:08pm PST 
I agree that i think it depends on the individual person as to what they find challenging.

I personally have found my Missy to be a challenge. Not in the sense of training or anything like that, she's very eager to learn and work. But rather temperamentally i find her challenging. She pushes my buttons quite easily. I think we clash at times! laugh out loud
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Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 2:45pm PST 
Exactly that! I'd like to know what you guys personally find challenging, whether it be low-drive, emotional, stubborn, sensitive, or too-smart-for-his-own-good. wink

For me, I'll define challenging as a dog who can easily out-smart its handler. For this category, which do you think is the most challenging?

Edited by author Tue Dec 4, '12 2:45pm PST

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Daniel the- Spaniel

I'm With the- Teal Deer,- Dahlings!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 3:08pm PST 
Giant Schnauzer! laugh out loud They are very tricky that way, and generally like to inject fun as they bore so easily....repetition, the hallmark of so much training, disengages them....so if only for their own entertainment and to keep things lively, they definitely are prone towards that. To work with them well, their number one requirement is your evolution as a handler....you need to keep it and yourself interesting, mix it up, keep them entertained. Train them right and they are capable of tremendous precision, but are equally capable of being rather unruly if you don't know what you're doing.

That's what I think makes them the most challenging. The award typically goes to the Bull Terrier, justifiably. But I think with Giants, their potential as to what they CAN be....the sky is definitely the limit with this breed, who knows no boundaries and will turn his guts inside out to please you when he finds it and you worthwhile....does give them some serious consideration for the title.

I personally find low drive the most challenging, particularly when coupled with stubborn. I have that now with my Daniel the Spaniel, who is the most under trained dog I have ever had, but he really doesn't need much. He's ultra stable, never in a rush to get anywhere, very unflappable. So I eventually figured, what's the point? He doesn't pull on the lead naturally, it's not like his behavior needs conditioning at ALL - nothing concerns him (dogs can lunge at him and he'll just keep sniffing the ground), never ranges far, very tolerant towards handling any way you want, etc. He's very enthusiastic to work for food, but he's got so much constancy that's he's really hard to interrupt when he's got his mind fixed on something and if he knows you don't have food sees little point. It just got to be too much of a drag....for I think both him and for me....so I work him on "sit" and there he is solid. That's really all we need and I've been officially retired...by him or by me I really can't tell....as his dog trainer wink

Edited by author Tue Dec 4, '12 3:24pm PST

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Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 4:25pm PST 
It's definitely about the owners personality I agree. If I had a dog who was aloof and independent and needed firm consistant direction from it's owner it would never work.
My dawgs would happily let me carry them in a frontpack and backpack all day long...as if I could carry 100lbs of doggie combined...woof
big laugh But that works for us. Bullies can be strong in body but big old mushballs inside. But they want to please me and I want to make them happy so if they hear "Very goood!!! I am sooo proud of youuuu!!!" Its completely heartfelt and they react to that.
But an owner who has very definite expectations about canine behavior might find a happy bully a tad too energetic to work with.
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Tyler

Whippy- The- Whipador
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 4:59pm PST 
I personally find low drive the most challenging, particularly when coupled with stubborn. I have that now with my Daniel the Spaniel, who is the most under trained dog I have ever had, but he really doesn't need much. He's ultra stable, never in a rush to get anywhere, very unflappable. So I eventually figured, what's the point? He doesn't pull on the lead naturally, it's not like his behavior needs conditioning at ALL - nothing concerns him (dogs can lunge at him and he'll just keep sniffing the ground), never ranges far, very tolerant towards handling any way you want, etc.

This is exactly like Tyler minus the not ranging far bit. He's quite independent out on walks so holding his attention can be tricky. You can offer him a treat or toy but if he finds something more interesting such as a sniff he can't ignore or a tree he just HAS to mark up, then he will go ahead and do it. He has low toy drive and while he likes treats he's not gonna go all out for them either. It's just lucky that he's such a stable and calm dog that i don't need to do much with him. He's happy as he is and we have an understanding that works well for us both out and about.

Although he finally got the hang of the begging trick the other day...only took me a year and a bit to teach him! laugh out loud But really he's not a trick kinda dog and i won't be teaching him anymore. He knows all he needs to know.
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Ava & Nix

Suburban Farm- Dogs
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 5:05pm PST 
Border Collies can certainly be challenging because of the brain/exercise requirements, but it would be a lot more difficult for me personally to live with any breed that doesn't have some natural inclination to be handler focused, or desire to please. A little independence is ok, but if a dog is too independent--like pretty much all terriers, for example--I don't think I could ever own one. laugh out loud
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Wrangler

lets play, play- PLAY.. :D
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 7:45pm PST 
I believe its the Blue Heeler...my wrangler is very mind challenging...lol....everyday he brings laughter to the house but on the same breath ..he is VERY stubborn.....and tries to do things his way and pushes my buttons but i LOVE him and wouldn"t change a thing
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Bella and- Daisy CGC

I'm a Meanie
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 7:53pm PST 
How fun!

The most challenging breeds for me would be those constantly looking to their handlers for direction. Like a border collie. My worst nightmare!


I know many people would cringe to try and train one of my independent, aloof, crazy (aka stubborn) coonhounds but I just love them!
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Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 8:55pm PST 
I'm with you Bella and Daisy! I look at Ria who's a Border Collie/Lab mix and think, "There's so much I could do with her.." and then I walk over and see my happy to just cuddle or do whatever Beagle and think, "Gosh, I LOVE hounds!" laugh out loud
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Moose

I love sitting- in laps
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 9:54pm PST 
Stubborn. I think that would be a huge challenge for me. I see bits of stubbornness in Moose and oh, it drives me batty. Our walks are where I see it most.
Anything more than what I'm dealing with would be a big challenge for me.
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