GO!

The difference between prey drive & hunting instinct

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  
Jewel, PCD

8.6lbs of fury- in a bow!
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 18, '12 1:49pm PST 
How can you tell when your dog just likes to chase things or when it's actually their instincts from what they used to do?

Take Jewel for example, a mix of a bred down old hunting dog - the poodle. She will sniff around, cock her head and listen, freeze with one front paw up into a point and then drive into tall grass or bush and flush out birds. Sometimes she'll chase them, sometimes just a few feet and then just watch them fly away.

Prey drive or instinct? And how strong does this instinct stay in the bred down sizes of hunting dogs or the "show" lines. At what point does it become nothing more than prey drive?
[notify]
Vladimir

Lady Killer
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 19, '12 8:25am PST 
The way I see it:

dogs, being predators all have hunting instincts, prey drive, however, is the level (or how strong) that instinct is. Different breeds were bred for different jobs and in hunting dogs, each breed has their own hunting style. Pointers were bred to do just that, point out the direction of the hidden birds and or flush them out so that the humans can deliver the kill.
Doesn't all work that way though. There are exceptions. Some might go as far as chasing and even catching the birds (that's when the individual personality of the dog itself comes in) But, keeping it basic right now.

And compared to the breed I have, the borzoi, they were bred to chase animals at high speed(hare, fox, and sometimes wolves) and sometimes, hold the prey, keeping it alive, until the hunters arrived. Most of the time, the animals (usually the smaller prey) will be killed, especially if the borzoi are in a group.

So the way I see it, prey drive is how strong or low the hunting instinct is.

Edited by author Wed Sep 19, '12 8:26am PST

[notify]
Bunny

Black dogs rock!
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 19, '12 4:15pm PST 
My idea is that prey drive is more of a " I must chase anything that moves quickly" whereas hunting instinct is more well thought out actions. Of course, I may have no idea what I am talking aboutlaugh out loud
[notify]

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 21, '12 9:51pm PST 
Prey drive is at it's heart a hunting instinct. It is the drive to chase moving things. Through a lot of selective breeding we humans have modified that drive in some breeds to serve different purpose's but it is still a drive to hunt. Ultimately you're talking about the same drive, a chase drive, sometimes coupled with a bite drive.
[notify]
Alva BH

I ordered the- best dog for me- & got her
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 22, '12 4:41am PST 
I don't know what to call it but I have 3 categories for behaviours related to hunt. a. and/or b. can be desired in hunting dogs, c. is useful in training obedience/agility/IPO.

a. willingness to follow deer's or rabbit's or other prey animals' tracks and when this instinct is strong the dog can leave the owner easily. These dogs are usually bred for hunting and are not easy to have off-leash in any unfenced area.

b. willingness to chase prey animals and leaving the owner. Unlike my category c. these dogs' instinct cannot be controlled or redirected that easily.

c. interest in chasing moving objects but not so willing to leave the owner. The dog is very interested in toys, and balls or dummies can be thrown or tugged as a reward. If a dog has too little excercise and is bored or has had a chance to reinforce this instinct (owner has not told that it's not ok to chase cats or rush after rabbits) it may chase other animals or joggers/bikers/cars.

My categories aren't probably only about drives but also about dog's interest in trainer and overall trainability. And I'm not sure if it works either, because I've only had category c. dogs.
[notify]
Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 23, '12 10:58am PST 
Generally, there is a full predatory motor sequence which involves a killing bite. It is modified in gun dogs to not involve a killing bite, of course. The herding behavior is another modified predatory motor sequence. Now ratters, I believe, and other dogs trained to kill prey, would have the full sequence.

Some dogs, of course, have both a full and a modified sequence. For example, farm dogs will kill varmints, but herd sheep.

Basically when your dog stalks, lunges, pounces, shakes and rips up his/her stuffie, he/she is exhibiting the predatory motor sequence.

So maybe we could say that instinct is present, but drive is the degree to which it exists.
[notify]
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 12:57pm PST 
Happy and Dr. Watson nailed it.

They are both the exact same thing.


Humans have just modified a dogs natural desire to provide for itself to better serve an artificial purpose.
[notify]
Jewel, PCD

8.6lbs of fury- in a bow!
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 1:06pm PST 
So we humans because we're so efficient have two names for one thing? shrug
[notify]
Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 9:25am PST 
No, hunting instinct and herding instinct are a 'modified' or incomplete predatory motor sequence. Prey drive is the full sequence. One would hope your gundog or herder doesn't have full prey drive. That's not to be tolerated.
[notify]
Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 30, '12 9:37am PST 
Kind of a weird example, but Watt doesn't shake things to kill them. He only carries them and retrieves them, whereas my Lab/Pit mix shakes them to death. Watt once did a big no-no, he RETRIEVED the neighbor's live Indian Runner duck, horrifying all of us. He presented the duck at the neighbor's feet, and the duck just shook itself off and duckwalked off.laugh out loud Now that's a soft mouth.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2