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Adopting a deaf/blind dog into a family w children..

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Bunny

Black dogs rock!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 4:25am PST 
I have no experience with blind/deaf dogs, but when I think about all the ads I have seen on Kijiji with people looking to re home their dogs because they have no time for them, I have to wonder how in the world someone with small children is going to find time to handle the training challenges that are going to come with a deaf/blind dog?
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Sadie Jo- Forever in- our hearts

Helping others - one dog at a- time
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 5:23am PST 
It can work if the family is committed and responsible. I've done rescue for many years and have placed 1 dog that was blind and deaf into a family with young children. She was a Australian Shepherd mix and the family had a 3 year old son, 6 years later and everyone is still doing great, they've never had a problem.
A family member of mine had a blind and deaf double dapple dachshund for a little over 5 years. She was wonderful with children. Sadly she was stolen in Houston last year and never made it back home.

It does take a lot of training, and I will stress again that only someone who is fully COMMITTED & RESPONSIBLE should have ANY dog.
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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 11:07am PST 
If she does want to come onto Dogster for advice, I have several youtube instructional videos bookmarked. But she doesn't sound exactly like the type who is looking for advice. I would highly recommend a vibrating collar, which you can make on the cheap on your own. I hope some day to own a deaf dog again.
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Member Since
02/17/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 12:40pm PST 
See and thats where you are wrong.. I DO like advice and value it. I was suprised to be spoken about on here so rudely, and to not be able to defend myself. In talking with the foster mother, the dog is wonderful with children, as she herself has YOUNG children. Maybe not as young as mine, but not by much. I would NEVER place the dog in a situation where it would feel the need to protect itself via a bite or a snap. I do understand the severity of the situation. I understand how dogs and children work and dont work. I might just be a "beginner" trainer, but I have a wonderful friend who is an amazing trainer who is my greatest resource. So I wouldn't have taken this one if I didnt feel confident. The dog has since been adopted elsewhere so it not of a concern anymore. But I do value all information I can get from any resource, as that is how people learn. By gaining any and all information on the situation.
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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 12:48pm PST 
Well, I apologize then.
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Member Since
02/17/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 12:52pm PST 
Thank you, not your fault. You were only given ONE side.. I do appreciate and all advice or links to youtube you may have. As I have offered to help with the training of the dog in its new home. My goal was to help this reserved dog come out of the shell and be something great. I take great pride in my two dogs. Bella is a therapy dog for hospice facilities. Winston is my little clown. Making everyone he meets feel relaxed and happy. They never placed in harms way. As both were rescues and come a long way.
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 12:59pm PST 
It wasn't rude to try to gain outside insight.

I wasn't sure if I was out of line with thinking the match would not have been the best one. So I brought the situation, generically and not linking it to you at all, to people I've associated with for years and trust.

When bringing my concerns to you you got very defensive and were not at all interested in hearing any other point of view. You were right, I was wrong, you are a dog trainer and could handle everything even if it was at the expense of the dog, end of story, for you, which was fine and I let it go in your thread. But I had every right to discuss it elsewhere. You posted in a public forum, people will discuss what you put out there.
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 1:01pm PST 
I will gladly provide the link if you think I've misrepresented the situation....hang on...
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Member Since
02/17/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 1:03pm PST 
You are right. You are able to discuss it on other threads. I do appreciate all insights and LOVE learning. My concern is that you posted that my training techniques boarder on the "DANGEROUS" and yes I am NOT an certified trainer. Doesnt mean that I am not trying for it. You do NOT know how I train. And that is what I take offense on. That is RUDE. I want nothing more then the dog to get the training it needs. Via whomever its with. It is all about the dog. And since its a puppy who was born this way, it deserves every chance possible of not being left behind or tossed away. I tend to do a lot of fostering just for that reason. And since I have not had the pleasure of dealing with a deaf dog before , I thought this would be a great learning experiance for myself and whomever gets the dog.

Edited by author Fri Feb 17, '12 1:08pm PST

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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 17, '12 1:29pm PST 
I am entitled to my opinion that advice you've given in the past was dangerous.

I represented you correctly as a dog trainer who was not certified. Why are you taking offense to that? I'm not a certified trainer either. That's not a bash, just fact.


Rescue dogs don't need pity. Its not a matter of who's merely willing to take them but moreso about what sort of home will best meet their needs. It's admirable you want to take on a blind dog, I wouldn't mind doing the same someday. That said it's not about what I want. Its about what would be best for that hypothetical blind pup. My kids are older than yours, phenomenal with rescue animals of many species, and I still wouldnt bring a dog compromised in both hearing and sight. Sure a pup may be tolerant but that doesn't mean a full grown dog will be. It doesn't mean when your kids have friends over they'll understand, or your family and friends, or other dogs or whoever.

You specified the dog would have been designated for your young daughter so it's not like the intent would have been to give it a peaceful and predictable life. Sure some dogs adapt, but what would have come of the dog if he couldn't have adapted to the unpredictability of a toddler? Sure management could keep everyone safe if you were really diligent but at what expense to the dog, and to your family.

Placing such high expectations on any rescue can be a stretch but on a rescue with such severe special needs?

I just can't wrap my head around the idea. That's not a bash on you, I'd say the same to all families with young children. I'll never agree that intentionally setting that scenario up would be a good idea. And yes, it would be dangerous no matter how well educated our is in regards to canines. To refuse to acknowledge the potential for disaster is very concerning to me.

Edited by author Fri Feb 17, '12 1:34pm PST

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