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what would you consider to be the cheapest breed to own?

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Jack

bunnies - YAY!!!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 29, '09 6:53pm PST 
ok, i was watching tv and saw a few dogs on there. it got me to think, what would be the cheapest breed to own? figuring if you got it from a puppy, got it fixed, kept up to date with shots, the amount of food, any typical problems in the breed, etc.

for example, a smaller breed is generally less than a large breed b/c of food costs and vet costs (require a smaller amount of meds). also, large breeds can have joint problems.

however, there are many smaller breeds that need regular grooming. also, smaller breeds seem to get injured a lot easier - broken bones, bug-eyed dogs can get the eye scratched, etc.

also, some breeds have more problems with cancers, tooth problems, etc.

i am talking purebred dogs here, though i have nothing against mutts or 'designer dogs'. i am just curious as to what everyone on here thinks.
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Sadie

Sassy and Shady
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 29, '09 7:35pm PST 
Well, my dog can hunt down and kill her own food, so that's about as cheap as it gets laugh out loud

Based on the typical expenses, she's extremely cheap. At just 30 pounds she doesn't eat much or require high doses of anything. Her breed has no known genetic issues, and though color dilution alopecia very rarely pops up, it isn't a health problem that can be treated with surgery or expensive medication. She's never been sick or seriously injured. Her short coat means no professional grooming. So, based on that, she's an economical model.

Of course the money I spend accommodating her behavior issues and working drive have made up for it. Obedience, rally and flyball classes that were paid for in advance and eventually abandoned due to her issues. Though we are currently on a break from agility, we were doing that once a week, twice a week for two months this spring. About 3 months of weekly one-on-one sessions with a behaviorist. Taking her hog hunting, which has required custom kevlar cut collars, clothes and snake boots for me, dues to the Texas Dog Hunters Association, gas money to drive all over Texas and needing to buy a new set of tires about a year early due to driving down too many ranch roads. Competing in hog baying competitions, which again require lots of gas money, occasional hotel rooms and entry fees. I pay for dog insurance to cover any possible injuries she could sustain from hunting or baying, but if something serious ever does happen, I expect to pay several hundred if not thousands of dollars to keep her alive. Oh, and we have to live alone in a one bedroom apartment because she cannot handle constant and casual exposure to most people and dogs.

So I suppose it balances out.

Edited by author Tue Dec 29, '09 7:37pm PST

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Sallie Mae

Sallie Mae
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 29, '09 7:58pm PST 
The stuffed type on grandchild's bed, bol. I think that the "what if's" cost a lot. If you have a dog that is pretty cheap on maintenance--you never know when an accident is gonna happen. If you have a breed with known problems, you look out for those particular things, but never know what life will bring to us. I had the dog that lived 24 years, and before it was over, even though she was a mix--she cost a fortune. I do not know that I ever want to see another grow as old as she did, though I have lots of fond memories of her. I now, along with 2 smaller dogs have a boxer--and I knew when I got her that her life expectancy was not as long as my other dogs. I just want enough money to keep them well and happy, bol. Cheap dogs--I don't really think there is such an animal, as owning means a lot of different things to different people. Some people will go to great lengths to keep their dogs healthy, and others do not even think prevenative care is a necessity. I tend to err on the edge of caution a good bit, and probably call or visit the vet way too much.
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Jack

bunnies - YAY!!!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 29, '09 8:07pm PST 
i agree the stuffed dogs are cheapest. i was just thinking a typical dog in the breed. also, not including the what ifs. there is always the possibility that the dog will have joint problems, but some breeds are known for it. also, any breed can run in front of a car but its more likely that they will see and go around a mastiff than a chihuahua. and also, i was thinking of an average yearly cost, not the amount for the entire life.
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Ginger- M.I.A.

my first and- finest
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 29, '09 8:07pm PST 
I am guessing a small-medium dog with short hair and good genetics. Smaller dogs eat less and meds will be cheaper.
I think this is why Chihuahuas are so popular... people think they are cheap and easy dogs to care for, as well as small and cute.

And getting an adult dog from a shelter or rescue will almost always be cheaper for you- you get a discount on neutering and vaccines, plus they usually ask less than buying from all but the cheapest (and least ethical) breeders.

Ginger is very cheap to own too- I got her for free, already spayed. She requires no grooming, eats little, and is in good health. I think I've only spent about 300 dollars on her (food and vet check-up) this year...
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The Urban- Hounds- (Formerly- the

Every dog must- have his day.
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 30, '09 4:59am PST 
No dog is predestined to be cheap. If thats a big concern for a person, Id say dont get a dog. Even if you get a small breed that is genetically predisposed to be healthy and accident or some untold event could happen and you wind up witha huge bill. I have a cat I got off the streets as a kitten. In her 9 years of life Ive spent over 9000 on emergency vet bills alone for various ailements she had (pneumonia, eye infections, fatty liver) and that is more then Ive spent on my pure bred pugs and bulldog who have happened to be very healthy so far.

i woudl say if money is a big issue avoid a very very large breed due to the feeding bills
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Laila

A lesson in- unconditionnal- love
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 30, '09 5:26am PST 
"No dog is predestined to be cheap. If thats a big concern for a person, Id say dont get a dog. Even if you get a small breed that is genetically predisposed to be healthy and accident or some untold event could happen and you wind up witha huge bill"


I agree.

Edited by author Wed Dec 30, '09 5:27am PST

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Posh

Pup-Pup
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 30, '09 5:53am PST 
Jack Russell terrier or Rat terrier. Small, hardy, porportionate conformationally, low grooming requirements and I think they are relatively healthy. blue dog
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The Urban- Hounds- (Formerly- the

Every dog must- have his day.
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 30, '09 6:18am PST 
Well thats actually just what Im thinking abotu Posh. I have afriend with two jack russels, one a rescue and one from the pet store. The pet store jack has been pretty healthy despite obviously coming from a puppy mill. The rescue jack has been fairly healthy too, but had an injury when he fell the wrong way catching a ball at hte dog park. She spent several thousand in vet bills.
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Jack

bunnies - YAY!!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 30, '09 10:42am PST 
really, some of you are just taking this too seriously. i don't care how much a dog costs...i'm willing to spend any amount to keep them healthy. no, i'm not going to get a breed that is supposed to be 'cheap' and be disappointed if they break their leg. i'm just looking for people's opinions. i know that there are dogs that are extremely expensive due to genetic issues in the breed. i also know that any breed can have health issues. still, there are some breeds that are easier than others. i think people are taking this thread the wrong way.

however, i would have to agree that JRTs are probably pretty cheap to own.
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