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Tell me about the Corso

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
Hershey

I'm sticking my- tongue out at- you!
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 16, '06 7:57am PST 
When we were in PetsMart last weekend my grandma fell in love with a Corso. Now she is determined to get one. Mommy said it's never good to get a dog because you fell in love with one you saw somewhere. So, can you educate me on the breed so I can educate Momma and grandma?
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Zeus

The ledgend- lives on.
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 16, '06 11:35am PST 
The Cane Corso Italiano is very loyal, willing to please, and easy to train because of these traits. But on the flip side, they are massive dogs that if not trained properly from puppyhood can lead to social and behavior problems. The Cane Corso requires a VERY EXPERIENCED dog owner as it can be agressive twoards strangers and most certianly other dogs. (Especially of the same sex.) They are very wary and suspicious of other people. Because of this they make an excellent guard or protection dog, but due to this age's detest for guard dogs they have been lumped into the 'bad dog' catagory by pro-BSL folks. A Cane Corso puppy needs to be socialized socialized socialized when it is a puppy to avoid the above as it gets older. Males can reach 110 pounds, and females can reach 100 pounds making it a dog that needs a powerful owner to lead it. Obedience classes are highly reccomended for this breed because of it's agression issues. It is a very athletic breed that needs a lot of exercise to keep it happy and should not be kept in an apartment or house with small yard. They need plenty of room to run. Some health issues include many for all of the Mastiff breeds---joint problems, hip dysplasia, eye problems, elbow/knee problems, bloat, ear problems. Originally the Corso ears were cropped to help ward off wolves while they were protecting livestock. (Same with tail). The livestock owners were not concerned with injury to the rest of the Corso's body as it is not affected by pain otherwise. Because of this, many Corso owners are dissapointed to find that their invisible fence won't hold them. (High fence is a requirement.) They do shed and it is a good idea to brush them with a brush or hand mit once a day or they will shed their little hairs profusley. One of the downsides to owning Mastiff breeds in general is that they do not live long. Lifespan can go from 8 years-11 years old, so your time with a Mastiff is short and very sweet.

Edited by author Sat Dec 16, '06 11:35am PST

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Paris Hilton

No more Puppy- Mills!!
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 16, '06 6:56pm PST 
Because there has been some bad press, I know that some people have been harassed by neighbors and dropped by their insurance companies for owning them

If grandma is older and not active or strong, not a good choice

Whynot have her talk to shelter staff and find a good match?
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Kiona CGC

The Prettiest- Princess

moderator
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 16, '06 8:54pm PST 
NO. Grandmas plus Cane Corsos? BAD. Grandmas plus Yorkies? GOOD.

Edited by author Sat Dec 16, '06 9:05pm PST

SIMBA

Young at Heart
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 17, '06 9:27am PST 
If you do get one, make sure you find a very very reputable breeder. These dogs are often used in underground dogfighting rings (especially since the Pit Bulls are being killed off). You DO NOT want a dog from fighting lines, especially one this large and strong.

If she is in love with the molosser breeds, suggest an English Mastiff. They have less tendency towards aggression and are not often used for dogfighting. Still try to find a good breeder because these dogs can have hip problems because of their size. You dont want one that has premature displasia, because Mastiffs dont usually last long anyways.
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Poncho

Weapon of Mass- Distraction
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 17, '06 10:49am PST 
I don't agree with the elderly having them. They can be good dogs, but they need a FIRM handler. Someone who atleast can equal their strength. Let them have a little in their ways without proper corrections and they can be very aggressive dogs
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Hershey

I'm sticking my- tongue out at- you!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 18, '06 4:49am PST 
Grandma is not what I would call elderly. She is in her early 60's. She has 10 acres of land and has experience with Huskeys and Doberman's and Rottweillers. But, right now she has a Chihuahua, Ralph. Mommy told her Ralph would become a snack.
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Zeus

The ledgend- lives on.
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 18, '06 6:08am PST 
I have to agree with the others. Even if she isn't very old. I am 22 years old and have a hard time at times getting my duo under control. Is she going to be able to get a 110 pound dog into the bath tub? Is she going to be able to trim a 110 pound dogs' nails? Is she going to be able to give it the 1-2 hours of exercise a day the Corso NEEDS? Is she going to be able to spend the money on a LOT of Obedience classes? Is she willing to risk the life of her little Chi if her Corso ends up being not as well socialized as she would like? (We know a Bullmastiff (intact) who lives with a French Bulldog and one day snapped and took the Frenchie's head in his mouth and popped his eyeball out. No kidding.) Does she have the home owner's insurance to cover such a dog? Is she willing to take full responsibility and the heartbreak if the Corso did bite somebody? Can she afford the 50 pounds of (high quality) food a month to feed a Corso? Does she have the money to fork out for joint supplements (which they NEED)? Does she have the $400 a year for flea/tick prevention? Same goes for heartworm prevention. If she goes to work, what does she plan on doing with it when she's gone? Corsos CAN NOT be crated all day long unless you're trying to mess up their joints. Does she have the money for emergency medication if something what to do wrong? Because of their size, their bill for medication is usually VERY high. If she gets a Corso with a bum hip, can she afford hip dysplasia surgery? A TPLO surgery?

These are all things to really consider. I agree with whoever the poster is. If Grandma wants a dog, have her get a Yorkie. Then her Chi will have a good (small) friend to play with.
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Hershey

I'm sticking my- tongue out at- you!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 18, '06 4:58pm PST 
I never said it was a good idea for her to get a Corso. I just wanted to point out that she's not a "little old lady". I don't have any experience with nor know anything about the breed, that's why I posted looking for information. I liked your first post, very informative. That was the kind of information I was looking for, more than just "bad idea". It's hard to diswade a hard headed woman with, "They say it's a bad idea."
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Belgian

Vote for me!!- see page for- details!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 18, '06 5:30pm PST 
Belgian's Mom-
elderly people don't mean they can't have big dogs my mom's mom before she died of ovarian cancer ( i was 6 then she was in her late 50's) had 2 rott/doberman mixs, bloodhound/lab mix, and a flat coated retriever. she had also rescued 2 pitt/lab/shepherd/chow puppies. Grandma's mom who is in her early 90's has a big giant shpherd/ husky/ mastiff mix right now
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