GO!

Aggressive towards other dogs

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  


Member Since
01/21/2013
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 1:53pm PST 
Hi, I am dog sitting my sisters boyfriends Staffie for a few months and have had him nearly 2 months! He is the most affectionat loving dog I've ever come across and whilst in our home is extremely obedient! However today he attacked a little terrier whilst out walking! He locked his jaw onto the terriers neck and nothing we did would make him let go, he would have killed the dog but luckily someone ran over who knew how to make them let go and he let go! Afterwards he didn't even seem to know he'd done anything wrong and looked so happy with himself! I'm so terrified because things could have ended so different and he is such a lovely special dog! But seeing him so aggressive was the most terrifying thing I've ever seen in my life!!!! I also found when I got home that I was bleesing and had probably been bitten in the incident! Probably by the other dog though as Tyson was locked onto him so couldn't have bitten me!! I want to muzzle him now because I can't risk him ever hurting another poor little dog now! I'm just so worried it will make him look even more aggressive but I know I have no choice because he will end up seriously hurting another dog and end up being put down! He is 2 and his owner said he has never been like this before and normally he doesn't even has a lead on as he just walks at matts feet!!!! I feel as though this is my fault and is there anything I can do to stop this aggression towards other dogs or is there something I could be doing that is making him this way?? Breaks my heart to see such a gorgeous affectionate dog turn so nasty and hurt another poor little animal frown Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!!!!!!
[notify]
Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 4:02pm PST 
Training him to a basket muzzle would be a good idea.
Please get him checked out by a veterinarian to make sure there is nothing medical contributing to his behavior.

How did the little dog behave initially to him? Did he just chase it out of the blue? At this age, he is becoming mature, and dog aggression can begin to manifest itself. But dog aggression can be managed and somewhat improved in certain circumstances.
[notify]
ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 21, '13 4:08pm PST 
Yes, there is something you can do about it. You may not be able to "solve" it, but you can certainly make it better.

Check out the IAABC website:

http://iaabc.org/dog

or the TDF website:

http://www.trulydogfriendly.com/blog/?page_id=4
[notify]



Member Since
01/21/2013
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 3:12am PST 
It all happened so quickly but he spotted the other dog and raced over! When he plays he does just jump on other dogs but my parents have a little terrier and when we first introduced them she would snarl and bark at him if he tried to jump on her and he would immediately back off! She never bit him but scared him so much that he wet himself!!!! But since they've spent more time together he's become more cocky with her and he's now too rough for her but he's never been nasty like this before!! He seems to be a lot more cautious of big dogs still and although he's run up to one he wouldn't jump up! I'd started keeping him on the lead because I was worried although he was only playing that he might jump on a little dog and cause some damage unintentionally, but as he needs to run I let him off when I can see there's no other dogs, but this time he spotted the other dog before I did and he was gone! He jumped on him and then the next thing I just heard barks and squeals and Tyson had locked onto his neck frown Thank you so much for your advice I will take him to the vets and get him checked over and some advice from them! I will also read through those websites thank you!
[notify]
ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 5:45am PST 
Wow, it seems like his "aggression" may actually stem from fear? This is called reactivity. You may want to look at a couple of links:

Former Dogster Debbie Jacobs has a site and ebook here:

www.fearfuldogs.com

The other site you may want to look at is

www.reactivedogs.com

Plenty of information on both sites and both Debbie and Ali are very approachable if you have questions.
[notify]
Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 7:04am PST 
Yeah, kind of sounds like my Missy who we believe is fear aggressive too. She will also "jump" a dog given half a chance, or plough right into the side of them and just launch herself at them into a full blown scuffle/fight. The behaviour might seem cocky or even "dominant", but it's usually because the aggressive dog is trying to "get in" before the other dog gets them. This kind of behaviour really needs expert help and i'd recommend asking your vet for a referral to a behaviourist, or at least suggesting the idea to his owner.

Interesting you say his owner said he's usually walked off lead right by his feet. I wonder if somehow being on lead made him more reactive. It's quite common for reactive dogs to feel safer off lead as they're not contained. Not that i'm suggesting you do walk him off lead. Not at all, especially as he isn't your dog. I think getting him used to a muzzle is a good idea for the time being.

Edited by author Tue Jan 22, '13 7:06am PST

[notify]
Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 7:38am PST 
I don't know how much longer you'll be caring for him, but a muzzle might be what you have to do, remembering that staffies can also do damage by sheer strength even with a muzzle. I might suggest you walk him in areas where you aren't likely to see other dogs, or at times of the day that you won't see other dogs.
Sophie is way leash reactive. Off leash she dances beside me and loves any dog we meet. When she has to be on leash she becomes Cujo instantly. Since you're babysitting you can't do much to change this behavior. But just stay alert and away from other dogs...cats too...in the meantime.
[notify]
Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 10:04am PST 
Not only may he feel better off leash and be less overreactive, he may also be more confident when walked by his actual owner. thinking
[notify]
Titus

Cave canis- vigilo omnis
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 10:20am PST 
Until you or Sister's BF can get some real, in-person help, I recommend a muzzle. I know a lot of people consider muzzles a rather drastic, last-ditch effort, but they really aren't. Conditioned properly they can literally be lifesavers. They can also help keep an over-reactive dog more calm by removing the option of biting. I don't recommend them for use with off-lead groups of dogs where only one dog is muzzled (dog parks or playgroups), but in one-on-one interactions, a muzzle can really help beyond just bite prevention.
[notify]
Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 22, '13 10:33am PST 
Yes, the dog should gradually be conditioned toward the muzzle. I'll look for a good article on that.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2