GO!

How Do I Teach...

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 2 of 3: Viewing entries 11 to 20)  
1  2  3  
Luna

Future Service- Dog
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 31, '12 11:02am PST 
She spent so much time looking all around that she would barely look at me, much less step closer. frown

~~~~~

How do I teach her not to bark when I leave? Last night I shut her into the bedroom and went back upstairs for a second. About 30 seconds after I left, she started whining and barking. I told her "No" firmly and ignored her. But I've got roommates and I can't do that to them!
[notify]
ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 31, '12 2:20pm PST 
So in yur driveway, just go back to clicking her anytime she looks at you and don't make it harder till she CAN look at you.

When you leave her alone, do you leave her with something wonderful to do? A frozen stuffed kong? A bully stick? Something to keep her busy?

Check out I'll Be Home Soon by Patricia McConnell for a nice protocol to work on leaving her.
[notify]
Risa- W-FDM/MF RE- RL1 CA CGC

Awesome Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 1, '13 6:08am PST 
You have to start slow and in minimally distracting areas. It's a lot to ask a dog who's just learning the concept of walking near you to do so when there's a lot going on. I work for several weeks in a very low distraction area building up the behavior until it's pretty solid before I expect a dog to do it in a more busy environment. And, even then, I pick a relatively boring outdoor spot and slowly work it up to more busy areas.

Remember, dogs don't generalize well. Even though she may become really good at it in one location doesn't mean it will translate immediately to another. You'll have to take several steps back every time you start in a new location initially. As she gets more experience, she'll start to generalize better. But you need to take it slowly and set her up to succeed rather than taking too many steps forward and wondering why she failed to perform.

Good luck!
[notify]

Luna

Future Service- Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 1, '13 6:37am PST 
Of course! She went through her first bully stick in 36 hours, and that wasn't even when I left her alone. Even at night, when I'm shutting her into the bedroom with me, I give her something. A Kong or hollow femur bone with peanut butter, her stuffie to play with, a bully stick...

Thanks for the book suggestion!

A couple of weeks? Okay. I'll work on her stepping toward me in different places in the house, and then work on her looking at me in the driveway.
[notify]
Risa- W-FDM/MF RE- RL1 CA CGC

Awesome Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 1, '13 8:02am PST 
If it helps, this is me teaching Jagger loose-leash walking. (It's about 2 minutes in if you want to avoid the other stuff.)

The Basics with Jagger

Note how boring the environment is. At this point, I had been working with him for about 1-1.5 months. I started by just clicking him following me when I took a step. I gradually increased the criteria and looked for him being closer to me and staying on the left side. Then I added in more than 1 step at a time though I never asked for more than 3. He was adopted over the weekend so I didn't get a chance to work with him on loose-leash walking in more distracting environments. So this is where he was after about 2 months of staying with me. We had several training sessions during the week lasting about 15-30 minutes (and I worked on several things during that time, not just LLW). Keep in mind, Jagger was also 2 years old and capable of working for longer periods. A young puppy should be working in much smaller sessions.
[notify]
Luna

Future Service- Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 1, '13 6:43pm PST 
Videos like that help a lot! Thanks for sharing.

Maybe I'm asking to much for her to step in my direction while outside? I'm going to keep working with her inside, because that's the most boring environment.

It also helps to have some sort of time frame for when I ought to see improvement. Part of me wishes I saw more change already, but then again, this is only the third day she's been here. I know that in the dog training world, slow is fast.
[notify]
ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 2, '13 3:31am PST 
What are you using as a reinforcer outside? Kibble probably won't get you there. Try meatballs, hot dogs, cheese, chicken, something much higher value.
[notify]
Luna

Future Service- Dog
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 2, '13 11:13am PST 
I need to buy hotdogs.
[notify]
ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 2, '13 11:30am PST 
Frozen meatballs are an easy one. They can be thawed quickly and are easy to break into tiny pieces.

I always challenge my students to come to class with something better in their bait bags than I have in mine. By week 3, they are getting pretty creative.
[notify]
Carbon

I'll just take a- nap until you- pet me.
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 3, '13 1:54am PST 
I personally do not use treats to train as I prefer praise to food reward but I have heard wonderful things about clicker training. Dogs are like children, not every tool or technique will work with every dog. Just remember to be patient and consistent and she will catch on for sure.

I would suggest giving a "watch me" command (I use 'hey you') and when she looks in your direction reward her, slowly start expecting longer 'watch me' periods working from a low stimuli areas to higher traffic ones. Keep working on the heel in the house like you are, I find teaching 'watch me' even without the actual heel part outdoors lays a really good foundation for transitioning from heel in boring spaces into higher distraction zones.

Another good thing to try is making her sit and wait at street corners, between 'watch me' and 'wait' she will make the connection easily from there, breaking up the walk into mini training sessions is a great way to sharpen skills!

As for the barking when you leave is it possibly a bit of separation anxiety or just boredom? Try taking her for a long walk or shorter run before you leave if possible. At the very least a good session of fetch in the back yard. A tired dog is a happy dog. I like to leave the radio on for my guys, not too loud mind you, just playing softly in the background so she doesn't feel too lonely!

Good luck and keep us posted!

Edited by author Thu Jan 3, '13 1:57am PST

[notify]
  (Page 2 of 3: Viewing entries 11 to 20)  
1  2  3