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barking and growling at other dogs

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Mika

blue/brown eyed- girl!
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 28, '12 2:26pm PST 
Thank you Bonnie for your response. Her ears and tail being up though is how she is 24/7. She is a Siberian Husky and that is just how they walk around. I understand most of what you have said except she has been socialized and was very good around other dogs since we have had her and from what her previous owners have told us. It is just last week she has started this odd behavior. So I was just trying to figure out where it came from all of the sudden and a possible why? As for off lead, she is not off lead at all unless she is at a dog park, i have been strongly warned from everything i have heard about huskies to not let them off lead, they are runners. It is not that she is anxious at all, she is an incredibly calm low key girl, very well mannered very sweet. And not a scared or anxious dog. Witch is why this has me confused as to why it has just started...Thank you again for your response and hope you dont find my answer rude i am not trying to be at all, just trying to clear up a few things.smile
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ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 28, '12 3:25pm PST 
Bonnie, I am not a BAThead myself. I find negative reinforcement to be a slippery slope.

Check out www.reactivedogs.com. I just spent the day doing privates and group classes. 2 reactive privates, then 2 reactive dogs in my Nosework class THEN 2 reactive dogs and a humane aggressive dog in my level 2 Nosework class. Our dogs do manage to graduate from reactive to regular classes fairly quickly.

And it sounds like you are doing just the right things, but the books or DVD's (I recommend One the Road to Reality) may give you some exercises and tips to help you along.
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Jackson Tan

Lad about town
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 28, '12 8:22pm PST 
I had a malamute I used to walk a long time ago and at first I found his shift in body language to read too, I was lucky though as his ears had floppy tips so it made the difference a bit easier to read.

First of all the arc of the tail would go straight like a tent post, instead of curling over the back as a spitz does when they are relaxed. Then his ears would pitch forward making them look as they should, but high on the head. His hackles would raise, his chest would thrust out, his mouth would shut and his eyes would go hard. These were all signs that he had locked onto something and was dangerously close to losing it. That is when you change direction and get him away from the stimuli. As Bonnie says, any behavioural modification can only take place when the dog is calm. Start teaching quick direction changes so you can be ready for these bad times, find a distance in which she can be calm and still looking at another dog, and then do the BAT then. My eyes were always on that mally no matter what because I didn't want to miss the warning signs, once your dog is growling and distressed there is not much to except get her away.

Good luck!
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Mika

blue/brown eyed- girl!
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 29, '12 5:56am PST 
Her tail stays looped over, i have never seen it go straight before? But her mouth does close and ears more to the front and you can definitely tell she's locked on to that dog coming her way , her stance will change to that of her more playful stance as she does when she gets exited when she's about to get a treat, or playing with myself or my daughters. So what your all saying to do then is go the other way when we see a dog but stay in view? Then work my way closer as the training and days go on? I will try that for sure! But do you have any idea why all of the sudden her behavior has changed towards dogs? As I said before she was so different just one week ago when we would walk? Also one more question, how do you and anyone else reading this feel about 'heel' i have heard alot of different views on it some people let their pups go out ahead and others say no it's best to keep them at your heel? What do you all think?
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Squ'mey

too old to eat- any more KD
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 29, '12 8:28am PST 
I do a combo..we will walk in a tight *heel for a block or two, then they get a chance to sniff around. They can pee/poop/mark or just smell the peemails. This is their chance to go out in front, crisscross back & forth, etc. Then we do a few more blocks working on obedience..sits, stays, waits. We also have a kind of in-between stage of "we're walking" This is not a heel, but also not a time to lolligag. Sure they can take a quick sniff or try to sneak in a mark..but "we're walking" means just that..we're going forward. They can lead the way..as long as there is no tension on the leash.
I don't believe dogs walk in front of us to try to dominate the world. They're excited, happy to do something with their people. They can't help it that we only have 2 legs & can't go as fast as they can!laugh out loudlaugh out loud
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Squ'mey

too old to eat- any more KD
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 29, '12 8:28am PST 
dog walkdog walkdog walk
noms monday morning double post

Edited by author Mon Oct 29, '12 8:29am PST

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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 29, '12 10:33am PST 
I agree completely with Squ'mey re: walking. Sometimes, they may walk behind me, sometimes in front, as long as the lead is slack, I don't give a fig. And I reward a good walk with sniffing and marking occasionally, depending on the dog. Watt only wants praise, physical and vocal. I mix it up with tight heels, automatics sits, waits, etc. I use "Look at Mes" (LAMA) since he is inclined to that already. Always has been inclined to look at me.

Personally, I don't regard the negative reinforcement, mild as it is, in BAT training to be going over to the dark side. Different techniques are appropriate for different dogs. Obviously negative reinforcement as done in the form of toe-tying or ear pinches in sporting dogs is over the top.

A good summary of techniques for overreactive dogs may be found here. It is by Patricia McConnell, an ethologist who has written several books on dogs:
"Dog/Dog Reactivity -- Treatment Summary"
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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 29, '12 10:46am PST 
These case studies may be useful as well:

Case Study -- Dog/Dog Reactivity--Ceilidh

and:

Case Study--Dog/Dog Reactivity--Reactivity--Hailey
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Mika

blue/brown eyed- girl!
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 29, '12 2:46pm PST 
awesome thank you very much
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Mika

blue/brown eyed- girl!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 30, '12 5:21am PST 
Ok so I have looked at all of the websites you all have said, and got a lot of good stuff from them, and on our walk last night i applied some techniques and actually the walk wasn't to bad, when we came across another dog i didn't let her get over her thresh hold and things went fairly smooth....not perfect but of course not to be expected. So i will keep at it and let know all how she is doing with her training, thank you all for your help , every person and dog who sent a post is greatly appreciated! smile
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