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My dachshund pees when new people/my roommate walk in the door?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Charlie- Chaplin

A day without- laughter is a- day wasted
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 17, '12 6:38pm PST 
It's driving me up the wall. Today my boyfriend's friend walked in and she barked over and over and finally when she quieted down my boyfriend went to pick her up and her pee sprayed everywhere silenced

She does this when men come over and for some reason my female roommate (who is nothing but nice to her). I haven't noticed it when my sister or mom come over.

Why does she do this? How do I make it stop before I pull my hair out?
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 17, '12 7:07pm PST 
First please breathe...meditatemeditatemeditate then if she is a new puppy it is likely just fear and she will outgrow it. If you have not had her to the vet yet,take her and make sure there is not a medical issue. If there is nothing wrong medically then the best thing to do is when you know someone is coming home/over take her outside to potty before hand,so that if she does get afraid/excited there will be far less mess or you can let her greet people outside and walk in with them so that she begins to see that they are not going to hurt her. Also work with trying to reward her for the good behavior,you said that she is comfortable with your Mom and sister and this doesn't happen,since she is fine with them let them hand her a treat even if it is just a piece of her regular food,then have others offer her a treat as they come in so that she learns that when they come,good things happen. It does take time patience and work but she can and will learn. Good Luck!
I hope that some of our people who are really good with dealing with things like this can chime in and give you more help or more detailed advice on how best to deal with the problem.wishes
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Charlie- Chaplin

A day without- laughter is a- day wasted
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 17, '12 7:25pm PST 
Thanks, she's four years old but she's only just been here for a week and a half. She was cleared by the vet.

I don't know if she did this elsewhere, the people my bf took her from didn't have guests over and those people actually took her from their parents, I guess they weren't giving her enough attention and keeping her in a small room.
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Niki

1229379
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 17, '12 7:45pm PST 
First off, don't punish her for peeing - it will only make it worse.

She sounds like she's nervous and being submissive to your roommate. Some dogs do it out of excitement too. I recommend working on building her confidence. Try arranging for guests to come over (1 at a time) and having her in a "safe" zone ... not too close to the door. Enough so she notices the person is there, but not too close to feel threatened. Let the person come inside and have them completely ignore the dog. Don't let them approach her either. While the person is entering, get her to focus on you. Use lots of treats and a clicker (if you have previously clicker trained her - very easy, see book called "click to calm" if you haven't yet) and praise her like crazy. Don't get her too excited, but do a treat-"good girl"-treat ... wait a couple seconds and treat her again when she looks at you. Then have the person leave. Do this as often as you can (a few times a week) until you notice she's fully focused on you and not concerned with whose is coming in the house. Then you can start having the people gradually come closer. Don't rush any of these steps, with a nervous dog it can be a set-back. Amazon is a great place to buy books on training nervous/shy dogs too!! smile
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Dingo

Leader of the- Dog Gestapo
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 17, '12 10:09pm PST 
Is she scared or excited?

My brother in law had a Jack Russell mix who did it out of excitement. They resorted to diapers because they couldn't keep him calm ALL the time.
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 18, '12 5:45am PST 
It sounds to me then,that she is very fearful of new experiences and very under socialized,so that each new person causes her to lose control and pee out of fear. One of our Dogsters is a trainer/behaviorist,actually there are several but Asher is amazingly helpful. I do not remember who the author is but she often recommends a book called, "Scardey Dog" that helps learn to manage fearful dogs and help them overcome their fears. Maybe she will pop in here with some advice.
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ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 18, '12 6:11am PST 
Thank, M&K. She sounds scared. I know it may be frustrating you, but imagine how frightening it must be for her.

Some things that may help.

If you know you have guests coming over, maybe save her dinner. Instead, give her a stuffed, frozen kong (if you need examples of things to stuff in a kong, ask and I am sure we can provide you with plenty). Give her the kong in a crate or safe place while the guests are there.

Don't let people be in her space or force themselves on her.

With you BF, maybe he could be the giver of all things good to her? Walks, meals, training (take a look at clicker training as a relationship building tool). But that means he can't represent a bad thing to her either, so if she does not like being picked up, he should not do that.

Take a look at former Dogster Sunny's site:

www.fearfuldogs.com

hug
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 18, '12 6:28am PST 
Asher,
Thanks so much for popping in. I will be checking out that website for myself as well.hugflowers
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ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 18, '12 6:32am PST 
Crate training can really help too. My dogs no longer need to be crated when I am not there, but I often find them lying in their crates anyway. I have made crates a wonderful, safe, secure place for them (except Kaluha).

If your dog knows the crate is her safe spot, she can go there when you have guests.

Hi M&K wave
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Lupi

I\\\'ll do- anything for a- treat!
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 18, '12 12:31pm PST 
You've gotten good advice. I just wanted to emphasize (since I have my own fearful Doxie) that many of them DO NOT like being picked up, even by people they know. They are very sensitive and seem to realize how fragile their backs are. Much better for people to get down to their level to interact with them.

In your case, your Doxie really needs to be ignored by visitors and to have a safe place (kennel) where she can take refuge if she feels overwhelmed. It shouldn't take long to get her used to a cozy kennel, since Dachshunds love burrowing and prefer to sleep with their heads under a blanket.

A stuffed Kong or tasty chew is an excellent way to occupy her, especially when guests initially arrive. After everyone's settled, you could let her come explore. But encourage your guests to ignore her and let her
come to them. They could give her treats if she approaches, but just because she takes food from someone doesn't always mean she's ready for them to pet her.

Watch her body language. If she moves slowly or stiffly, leans forward to sniff instead of moving closer, keeps her tail tucked or low, licks her lips, or even lifts her paw a lot, she's still nervous. My rule of thumb is if Lupi feels comfortable enough for a new person to pet her, she'll nudge them. Otherwise, they can ask for a high five or shake a paw and give her a treat.

Be careful not to scold her or get upset when she pees (I know it's hard!) or it could make her even more scared. Because she does it mainly with men (bigger, deeper voices=scarier) I'm thinking the peeing is definitely fear, not excitement. You should find a big improvement if men make it a practice not to look at her or talk to her when they enter the house. And if she does pee out of excitement (not uncommon for the breed) the same rules apply. The calmer others are, the calmer she'll feel too.

Hope she feels more comfortable in her new home soon!
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