GO!

I like swinging my butt out- improper heeling

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Bosley

Will Work For- Food
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 7, '12 7:27am PST 
I don't think I said doing heel work with a pup is a sin but I did say 6 months is too young to be putting all the steps of formal heel work training together. I do heel work with my pups but I don't expect them to have the mental or physical capabilities to sequence the steps that all go together in formal heeling. I practice fronts and finishes and sitting in heel position with attention and maybe a few steps in heel position but I would never ask a 6 month old puppy to combine these. But then, I am looking for behaviours that will eventually be carried over to the competitive obedience ring, and I see all to often what happens when you rush or lump training behaviours together.

Creating a pup that wants to learn and play the obedience game is so much more important to teach a puppy than the individual behaviors are. I just hate to see people rushing the training of their puppies or dogs be it formal obedience, agility or anything else that involves complicated learned behaviors. I really cring when I see people take puppies in the obedience or rally ring - it is not often that I see these puppies go on to compete at the higher levels - it is way to young to put that kind of stress or expectations on a pup.

Edited by author Sun Oct 7, '12 7:48am PST

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Ridley

Cry cry cry!
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 7, '12 8:10am PST 
Why can't there be both?

I don't see why one can't create an enjoyable learning environment for a puppy and still work on precise behaviors.

I have very clean heel work with a puppy who was started young- He was never run down for not being perfect, but I see no reason not to start working on it and troubleshooting behaviors so long as, again, one is responsible with their expectations. I don't think the OP is aiming for an OTCH here with their puppy... I don't see the problem.
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 7, '12 9:53am PST 
I'm inclined to agree with Bosley on this one...

And this is not so much because this is a 6 month old puppy (because I think that it depends a lot on the dog and on the owner's skills as well), but because I have read a few of the OP's recent threads on similar subject (one of which was asking which corrective collar to use to teach LLW for this puppy) and from the information that's been provided, any sort of heelwork sequences sounds like an unrealistic expectation for this pup at this time.

Personally I would be focusing on focus work, and on rewarding in heel position (not moving) in all sorts of different situations. Make that heel position an awesome place to be.
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Bosley

Will Work For- Food
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 7, '12 10:26am PST 
I don't think there is anything wrong with working precise behaviours with a puppy. But those should be broken down into the tiniest steps and not lumped together into sequences. The problem is that people tend to be lumpers and expect far too much too soon in terms of precision, long before the puppy has the foundation behaviours mastered.
Puppies are amazing and can learn so much but they are still just puppies.
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