GO!

Trust Training

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 1 of 3: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  
Rayne

My little rain- cloud
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 1:28pm PST 
Ok, going to make this short and quick as I'm in a hurry to work with this particular dog.

We were surrendered an 11 month old female Great Dane at our rescue. She is deaf and we believe she has poor sight. She was allowed to be the dominant resident in the home and she is quite fear aggressive.
I need tips on how to get her to trust me so she can come into my home and be worked with one on one. Right now she is at the rescue so I can only spend a few hours a day with her. I need to gain some trust so she wont keep trying to bite and work with her in a home environment.
ANY tips or tricks would be greatly appreciated. This is her second day with us. Right now we just hang around her with another great dane to show her we wont hurt her. I give her treats any time she's in a calm state of mind. She wasn't beaten or abused, she's just VERY unsure of everything.
Ideas??
[notify]
Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 4:30pm PST 
You say she wasn't abused but are you sure? Danes are really quite easy going dogs so any aggression would raise alarms for me. At 11 months she is still very much a pup, sadly most Danes that are surrendered are 8-18 months.
If she is deaf she has possibly resorted to acting out in order to communicate, especially if her owners weren't into trying. Does she have any training at all? About the worst thing you can do to a Dane is isolate them. If possible keep her near someone all the time, use rewards when she is being good and if she doesn't have one start building a communication system of signs, gestures and touches. If she is being a bully something as simple as turning your back on her for a minute could be highly affective.
[notify]
Jax (earned- her wings- 5/30/12)

Give me your- toy.
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 4:37pm PST 
When I first got Jax, I spent a lot of time with her just hanging out, talking to her and giving her lots of treats. I didn't push her with anything for the first couple of weeks. After a while, I worked on very basic commands. I never raised my voice to her or made harsh mannerisms toward her. It might be a little hard for you, since she is used to being dominant. Although, she might not behave like that in new surroundings. Long walks, in quiet places will help you bond. I did that with Jax. At first she was terrified of everything she heard, saw and smelled. But after a while she realized, I would not let anything happen to her. One of the commands I taught her was "Go See". That meant if she was afraid of something and I told her to Go See, that meant it would not hurt her and it was ok to check it out. The important thing with teaching that is....absolutely never let anything startle her while your teaching it. Good Luck with your new pup and I hope that helps.
[notify]

Jax (earned- her wings- 5/30/12)

Give me your- toy.
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 4:39pm PST 
Oooops, I forgot she was deaf, but you can teach her signs, like sign language. Good Luck with her.
[notify]
Rayne

My little rain- cloud
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 5:46pm PST 
Nope, she has NO prior training. She was with another female German Shepherd in her old home but attacked her after a year of living with her. That's why they needed to find a place for her to go.

Bringing her into a home right now is not possible. She is SO easily set off and into aggression mode if you come too close. I met the family when they brought her to us, and they said that they had smacked her butt when she would misbehave and NEVER had her around strangers or took her out to socialize. Any time someone came over, she was locked in a room. She's basically been a recluse her whole life. When they gave her to us, she was VERY protective of them. Borderline obsessive it seemed. We've never been scared by a dog before, but she was SO intense that it did rattle us a bit (we don't show that around her of course, no bad energy.)

We NEED to get her to trust us so we can get her in my home. We cant even get 10 feet to her. I want to do touch training (since her eyes aren't that great) and get her rehabilitated but I've never had a dog that wouldn't let me physically touch them! I spent FOUR hours just sitting with her today, trying to get her to take a treat. She will not take anything from us yet, not even if we throw them off to the side. She's totally shut down, the poor thing. Once she's trusting us she'll be a permanent resident in my home, she wont get adopted out to another family so I'm not dead set on a perfectly behaved dog right now just a trusting one that wont try to bite me every time I get close lol
Thanks for the encouragement guys (I still talk to her, even though she cant hear me Jax lol. I feel like she can feel my energy so I'm always happy go lucky with her.)
[notify]
Kodiak

The cheese ninja
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 6:02pm PST 
It sounds like you need to start at square one. Here's a link that I bookmarked from another dogster.

http://cynography.blogspot.com/2009/02/taming-wild-beast.html?m= 1

please delete any spaces that appear.
[notify]
Jax (earned- her wings- 5/30/12)

Give me your- toy.
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 6:04pm PST 
I saw a show once, "Dog Town", where they had a dog that would shut down. So, they just spent time near her, reading or doing homework or on the computer, just ignoring her, with no eye contact or touching. This went on for days, maybe even weeks, (I can't remember), after a while, she got curious. Soon she came over for a sniff, when she thought the trainer wasn't looking. After a few sniffs, they put their hand down next to them with a treat in it. Still ignoring the dog with no eye contact or touching. Basically, they took very tiny baby steps in the training, introducing themselves to the dog. Then it just got better from there. Maybe you could try that.
[notify]
Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 6:15pm PST 
Freeway was deaf and I talked to her for almost 7 yearslaugh out loud
I agree with ignoring her and I think you will find that food is your friend. It sounds like she was frustrated and lashed out. I would be using a long line and lots of treats.
As a side note Danes are obsessive about their people. And isolation for them is abusive. These are dogs that are super sensitive and get a little odd when forced to be alone. You are going to need to be gentle and forgiving. Good luck.
[notify]
Milo

My love is worth- your time
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 6:27pm PST 
I know that danes and doxies are very different size wise but Maggie and Milo were both fear aggressive when I rescued them, Maggie was not as bad as your dane but Milo was, no one could touch him including me...the people has kept him in their backyard for 5 years and had never done anything with him. They told us he was not abused as they had him since he was a puppy but he has a healed break in his tail and his paws are slightly deformed (my vet thinks it is from standing on a wire bottom cage for most of his life).

He only felt safe in his crate so I would have treats and just sit with my back towards him and read a book or something. I would have the crate closed a first because even though doxies are small they can still cause damage when biting and I did not want to take that chance. When he would smell or show any interest in me I would just drop a treat in his crate. We did this for a long time until I decided I felt comfortable doing the same process with the crate door open, after about 2 weeks of the crate door being open he finally came up to me and sat next to me. I did not try to touch him until I knew that he wanted affection, you do not want to push it as pushing it will damage the dog even more and reinforce the fear.

Milo is now my boy, he is okay with me doing anything to him and is starting to let other people touch him and give him treats but it is a long process and can be very frustrating.

It is hard because you just want to help the dog but they do not understand that, a fear aggressive dog is extremely hard as you never know what will set them off. Once the trust is built it is very rewarding but getting to that point is very difficult and takes a lot of patience.

The best advice I can give is to be patient and stay positive.
[notify]
Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 27, '12 6:37am PST 
What I like to do with truly fearful dogs is just sit in the same area as them and ignore them. I'll even take a nap or at least lay down and close my eyes. Let them get used to you on their own accord.

Not sure how a dog can be so fearful and be claimed dominant at the same time, but that is rather irrelevant if the dog is truly fearful and has issues with trust. Time is the best thing you can give her. Structure too. Being predictable helps. If she knows that every time you visit you don't attempt to do much of anything, she'll find comfort in it.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 3: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3