GO!

Do big dogs really not see little dogs as "dogs?"

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 5 of 7: Viewing entries 41 to 50)  
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  
MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 22, '12 8:05pm PST 
My dogs both seem to be perfectly aware that small dogs are in fact dogs.Their favorite playmates in fact are all considerably smaller than they are,they like to play with my sister's puggle and beagle (13 in,) my friends Boston Terrier and my Daughters 5 pound Maltese,the Maltese is DA and likes to think he is a "BIG" dog,he has barked at,growled at,and even nipped at my pups Making Kai on more than one occasion bleed,their reaction is to use their huge tongues to lick his entire face at the same time,even with his agression they adore him and are well aware he is no threat.
[notify]
Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 22, '12 8:15pm PST 
I don't know but I think Soph sees any small dog as puppy, even an elderly dog. She has such incredible patience with small dogs, even if they bark she just turns tail and walks away. But she loves playing with teacups, so gentle...she has to play bow laying on the ground to be nose to nose, so cute to watchlittle angel
[notify]
Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 1:04am PST 
I don't think it's "normal." I don't think it's most, or even a large minority, of "big dogs."

I do think it's a risk, one that is greater or lesser depending on the the dog and the circumstances.

It's a bigger risk with sighthounds, but especially with retired racetrack greyhounds. They've been both heavily selected for prey drive, and have lived their lives until retirement in an environment where the only animals they see are humans and greyhounds. But it isn't even all retired racing greyhounds that react like this.

It's also a bigger risk when the dogs aren't meeting close up, but rather your high-prey drive big dog sees a small, fluffy dog running some distance away. It can trigger that prey-drive pursuit response, and the dog may not realize he's chasing another dog before he's got the little one in his mouth and is shaking it.

Some breeds and mixes are also somewhat more likely to have some dog aggression, but that is, I think, different from the abnormal combination of circumstances that can lead a big dog to mistake s small dog for prey.
[notify]

Gunner

Gunna get \'em!
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 5:15am PST 
I found Essay on small dogs and big dogs at a dog park.

It may not be the most normal response, but again, I don't generally consider it an abnormal response either. I don't have a percentage or anything like that, but I know that IT HAPPENS. And I know that it happens often enough to have a handful of us witness it, and know people who it has happened to.

That's enough, IMHO, to make me cautious with even my bigger dogs.

ETA: Here is another!


I found both of these on a simple Google search. They're both high ranking on the first page.

Edited by author Thu Aug 23, '12 5:19am PST

[notify]
MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 6:18am PST 
Gunner even I knowing that the other smaller pups are beloved playmates do think caution is always in order and we never allow our pups and any dog they play with to be unsupervised at any time. That to me is asking for trouble. My dogs also adore children,there again I wouldn't care what breed they are to me it is very unwise to leave any dog play with a child or be near a child alone. No matter how sweet and gentle the dog,or how well trained the child is to be around dogs,it is just IMHO a bad idea not to supervise because things can go wrong and accidents do happen.
[notify]
Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 7:25am PST 
I've handled numerous large sighthounds (including several wolfhounds, so not all have been track dogs) and many large terriers. It's all about prey drive. A small furry runs and they often give chase. period. It's in every bit of their DNA to do so. They are only doing exactly what wild canids do, further distilled by human manipulation in breeding and sometimes even further enhanced by individual training. Small dogs happen to be small furries. Just like cats and pet hamsters happen to be small furries. Dogs aren't born knowing what critters are 'off limits'.

What happens after the chase depends on many variables that have already been mentioned like how strong the dog's hunt instinct and prey drive are, socialization or lack thereof, how far away the small dog was initially, how long the chase was, the people responding, if any...I've seen a large dog stop and switch into 'play mode' once they realize the quarry is a small dog several times. Not every dog is capable of doing that, though, for a variety of reasons.

I've seen wolfies happily playing with small fox terriers many times, even puppies with such gentleness I could hardly believe it. I've also known some that couldn't resist giving chase and shaking no matter what kind of animal was running. From the same litter, raised the same way; so as usual, a lot comes down to knowing thy dog.
[notify]
Tyler

Whippy- The- Whipador
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 8:09am PST 
Alot of it does come down to socialization. My experiences have been different than Lucille's in regards to Sighthounds & Terriers, but i would guess that with our differences in the way our dogs are walked, that Sighthounds & Terriers here learn to interact with all kinds of dogs off lead and it's the norm. Where as over there, it's probably not the norm for most big dogs to interact with little ones going by what i've heard in most dog park situations with the big/little sections.
[notify]
Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 9:00am PST 
I certainly don't think anyone can make generalizations. It all depends on the individual dog. Sophie is incredibly selective...house cats and she's afraid-stray cats that are not ours are prey, small brown dog is playmate-small brown rabbit is toy, geese and snakes are scary-squirrels and chipmunks are squeaky fun. You have to know your dog and always err on the side of caution
[notify]
Savannah- Blue Belle

A Heart of Gold!
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 9:30am PST 
Attitude seems to cover it. One of my dogs once when sailing after a cat which did not run, but stood its ground. She ran straight into it and sort of head butted it. The cat yowled, but did not run.

The dog looked a little annoyed, but then turned around and walked away.

I once saw a rabbit do the same thing to a cat...the rabbit just stood there and the cat plainly was at a loss. It kept yowling, but the rabbit rared up on its hind legs and the cat eventually slunk away.
[notify]
Saya

I want to play!
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 23, '12 3:22pm PST 
Greyhound is Saya's enemy.. They will pester her a lot and be rude maybe it's because Saya bunny hops due to her spinal injury?

They're like are you a dog or bunny? She is 21lbs and very tough not like a small dog. like chihuahua.
[notify]
  (Page 5 of 7: Viewing entries 41 to 50)  
1  2  3  4  5  6  7