GO!

Need "Socializing" Help

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 1 of 4: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  
Abby Mae- Brooks

1236388
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 27, '12 4:11pm PST 
I need some help and suggestions. We have a wonderful Carolina Dog that just turned One year old. The problems is Socializing her. We live in the country with only two neighbors. Not much opportunity for us to visit and work on manners with others. She has great manners at home and responses well to all voice or hand signals. Abby, our little girl, gets soooo excited around visitors. She jumps on them, and demands their attention. Which I always correct. I believe in having a respectful dog. But when I have taken her into Loews or Petsmart, Abby cant keep in her skin. She pulls to get to anyone that will love on her. She will cry, beg, and go crazy when she is around people or dogs. She wants to play. But in her excitement she misbehaves. Once she gets your attention, she calms down. HELP. I have started making her sit and wait before I let anyone touch her. I want her to know that if she sits and is patient, they will come and love on her. Any suggestions are welcome. Thanks in advance.

Edited by author Mon Feb 27, '12 4:31pm PST

[notify]
Leia

1237066
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 28, '12 3:40pm PST 
It seems that so far you are doing a great job! wink I enjoy watching Cesar Milan's Dog Whisperer, and I have some advises for you from the show. You should have a rule saying "No talk, no touch, no eye contact". Basically, the guest should ignore the dog until it calms down. Then they can pet her, play with her and all the good stuff wink At the pet store - hmm pretty much the same thing. You have to teach her that she will get all the attention she wants when she's in the calm state of mind - not overly excited, not anxious, not aggressive etc. So basically - exactly what you are doing (making her sit and wait). Now, that's for people. For other dogs - you should get her used to other dogs being around. When you pass another dog in the store, just make her sit and ignore the dog. It will take some time, but she'll finally get the point that meeting another dog is just something usual and not something to get overexcited with. She seems like a great dog, she really doeswink I'm sure you two are going to be just fine wink And if you want to meet other dogs and owners - maybe you could drive to the nearest dog park? Or maybe there's a dog club that has play dates every once in a while? Or maybe you have friends who own dogs? Good luck! smile
[notify]
Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 28, '12 4:55pm PST 
I don't believe making her sit while other dogs go by is a good idea- it totally goes against a dog's instincts- both hers and the other dog's if they want to try to sniff her behind (a totally natural thing for dogs.) I see people doing this and it's usually counterproductive- you get a frustrated dog that is learning their person wants them to do irrational things with no reward, so why should they obey?

If you want her to sit calmly in public when others pass, you have to work up to it- 100% sit on command at home, then in public places with no distractions, then in public with other people around. I'd skip taking her to Petco and other doggy places until you have more control of her- it's just going to frustrate both of you.

Also, how are you correcting her when she jumps on people? I agree that it's rude, but often corrections only get the dog more amped up- such as shouting at her or pushing her away. Some dogs find this exciting so it's actually the opposite of a correction, it's encouragement.
[notify]

Leia

1237066
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 28, '12 5:04pm PST 
Oh, don't get me wrong Bruno, I too think that dogs want to sniff their butts and get to know each other that way. But we are talking about super excited, super hyper dog who probably doesn't want to sniff, but jump on and play with other dogs - without "getting to know them" - which could be dangerous if she met an aggressive or scared dog. That's why she needs to learn to be calmer around dogs - kind of a doggie savor vivre wink
[notify]
Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 28, '12 6:30pm PST 
yes but you can't start at that level. You have to create obedience and focus in other settings first. Asking an excited, mostly-untrained dog to sit calmly in a pet store with other dogs around is like throwing them into a shark tank.

Asking your dog to perform when they're not ready only creates frustration, which the dog will sense and it can poison your interactions altogether. They also learn that their human makes a lot of noise and fuss but they don't have to pay attention when more interesting things are happening.
[notify]
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 28, '12 6:31pm PST 
Leia, in fairness you're not there and cannot begin to properly assess the situation. It can be quite dangerous to dole out TV trainer type advise simply by guessing the intentions and temperament of a dog you've never met.


I do agree with Bruno OP. The dog is likely over threshold and trying to work obedience when they're right there in it can and definitely could lead to frustration and worsening reactivity.

Do you have any sort of training classes available in your area? Or parks or walking trails? Even working at a greater distance from direct hub-bub remaining in the parking lot could help you.
[notify]
Leia

1237066
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 28, '12 6:37pm PST 
Neither are you. And what kind of obedience are you talking about? She said that " She has great manners at home and responses well to all voice or hand signals". What do you think a personal trainer is going to do? Look at the dog and magically the problem will disappear?
[notify]
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 28, '12 7:23pm PST 
Having access to a dog training facility would give the OP a place to practice gaining control around other dogs and people at varying distances, with cooperation and assistance from willing participants who are aware of the problem, and under the guidance of a professional who can intervene if the OP has any questions or concerns.


Nothing magical about that party
[notify]
Leia

1237066
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 29, '12 4:25am PST 
And all of that the owners could do themselves.confused
[notify]
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 29, '12 5:22am PST 
Actually, that seemed to be the exact point of the thread...the fact that the owner was struggling with finding opportunities to work this problem and maybe could benefit some guidance and assistance from cooperative participants and qualified professionals instead of random strangers on her own.


Per the title of the thread "Need Socializing Help"...*socializing* is not one can do alone. Reactivity and greeting issues can not be worked through completely alone either.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 4: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4