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Dog wants to sit outside in the cold?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Koorazh

You can't catch- me!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 8:42am PST 
So it's about 35 degrees, and Koorazh wants to sit outside in the backyard in a curled up dog ball. He's not sick, he just seems to like it. He doesn't want to come in, in particular, and when brought in, wants to go back out. He's got a double coat, but when should he not be permitted to do this? How long should he be permitted to do this? I know in Alaska people leave their dogs outside during the winter, so standards are different regionally . . .
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Zephyr

1213425
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 8:49am PST 
Honestly my answer would change depending on how likely my neighbors are to think of me as neglectful and call the police. Somewhere in the 10-40 minute range probably indefinitely if they had an insulated straw-stuffed dog house.

If he's really balled up I'd say it's time to bring him in.
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Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 10:14am PST 
If he's fine outside and enjoys it, why not let him be?

That's one thing I don't understand. Why people force their dogs to be inside when they are happier and perfectly safe outside in the moment. If the dog wants in or is cold, they'll let you know.
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Koorazh

You can't catch- me!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 10:20am PST 
The concern is for the health and well being of the dog, and the assumption is that dogs don't always know what is good for them (as where they eat chocolates or socks, for example).
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Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 10:26am PST 
I'm of the opinion that a dog is smart enough to know when they are cold and seek out a place of warmth.
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Kloppers

Are you talking- to me?
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 10:59am PST 
My Saints always want to be outside when it is cold...however in the summer they barely spend anytime outside. I think dogs are smart enough to know when they are ready to go in. My Saint doesn't curl up in a ball, she sprawls out on her side...like my Chihuahua in the summerlaugh out loud

I would say as long as it is not wet or snowy not to worry so much..the sun can make you hot even on the coldest of days.
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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 11:16am PST 
In a dog with an insulating coat, such as a golden, I'd say 4 hours. But a caveat is, lying in cold or on cold floors may be a sign of fever or pain. thinking

My last 2 goldens have routinely laid on snowbanks for 4 hours in cold weather. 6 hours is too much for them, however. smile
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Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 12:44pm PST 
Kato doesn't have what I'd call a thick coat, but he went swimming the other day. It was like 20-something degrees out, and there was snow on the ground.

He went in on his own. The water was super cold. He did not mind it one bit. In fact, he took multiple dips in the creek.shrug

Granted, he was moving around and not laying still, but still, I couldn't believe it.

Sanka on the other hand, when he accidentally stepped on the ice and broke through and got his paws wet, he looked like he stepped on hot coals. That water was too cold for even his paws.

I am really always amazed at how warm dogs really can be. I get cold easily, so I always think they're cold too lol. But they really aren't. They are much more comfortable in it than we are. And snow tends to make it warmer, not colder. And usually when it is snowing, it's warmer out too.
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Hazel

Noise Police
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 6:22pm PST 
He'll know when it's time to come in. Still, I'm a worried person and would probably check in every so often if he's just laying on uninsulated ground, to make sure he is still warm and happy to be out there. smile
Hazel would probably choose to stay outside all day and maybe sleep in the house, if we had a fenced yard. Your dog is lucky!
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Lenny

Lenny -The- Wrecking Ball
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 11, '11 7:23pm PST 
Our German Shepherd, Lucky, was pretty much the same. She loved being outside in winter and playing in the snow as well as curling up and napping out there. I think with her double coat she was hot in the house considering my mom has it a bit higher than the average person. We just checked in on her and offered her opportunities to come inside. We did make her come inside at night after we all went to bed, but if she wanted to be out there we let her. Just check in on your pup and see if she wants in. If not, and the weather isn't too bad (snowing very hard, or sleet, high einds, etc) then I'd say let your dog be where they want to be.
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