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Deaf dog?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Patch

Lets be pals,- rub my belly!
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 3:16pm PST 
I have been long searching for my 3rd dog. I found him today. He is a 10 month old cattle dog who is deaf.
I want to make sure this is the proper choice for me even though I feel it right in my heart.
What kinds of things should I know for training and caring for a deaf dog?
Right now he is basic obedience and he is doing good, they have him training with a vibration collar for recall and say he is a great agility canidate.
Any advice before I fill out the application?
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Angel

Little Angel
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 4:33pm PST 
One of the best tips I can give is just treat him like a normal dog. smile At first it will be strange, having to do things like physically getting up to get him out of the trash or calling his name and him not coming. But after a couple weeks it will feel completely normal to you. None of my difficulties with Angel ever came from him being deaf.

The only real big difference between the care of a deaf and hearing dog is deaf dogs should NEVER be off leash unless in a contained, safe area. If they wander they can't hear you to get baeck, they can't hear cars or any other predators, so its a safety issue.

If you have kids, I would specifically ask a) how he is around kids and b) what he is like when he's startled. I know few here on dogster are cruel enough to startle their dogs intentionally, but stuff happens. Some dogs nip when startled, and some don't regardless of whether or not they can hear, but the truth is deaf dogs do startle easier because they can't hear things around them. I'm very lucky with Angel he has never bit when startled or displays any type of negative fear reaction.

If your lifestyle would not be hampered with his inability to be offleash (an thats not a bad thing, sometimes I envy my parent's pack that goes for offleash hikes all the time,) I think it would be a great experience. smile Its wonderful that you are considering giving him a chance. smile Especially since he's already had obedience courses and is working with a vibrating collar it sounds like he has gotten a great start and you guys will have all the tools and support needed for this endeavor.


Keep us posted. smile If you have any more questions feel free to ask or send a PM.
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Patch

Lets be pals,- rub my belly!
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 4:46pm PST 
Firstly
Angel is beautiful!!!!

Second, thanks for the tips. IF they said it was a ok idea the only place I'd ever take him off lead is a dog park. I only go to fenced ones and I never am one of those people who doesn't know where my dog is.
I don't have kids. Just the two older dogs.... 7 and 8. I feel this is gonna be really prefect for all of us. We do visit my mom often though and she has two dogs as well, one who is iffy with other dogs but really they would not NEED to be together.
I considered a wheel chair dog and went to meet him and realized it wasn't a good fit for me, not because I didn't love him but because his care literally took up most of their days and I like to split my time between all my dogs. So thats why I asked, if a deaf dog was a FT job then it probably wouldn't work but if its something I could easily work with my other dogs around, it will be good
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Saphira In- My Heart- Forever

I'm deaf..says- who??
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 5:19pm PST 
We treated Saphira like a normal dog! she would recall with a vibration collar and knew tons of hand signals! Deaf dogs are alot like any other dog. If you have small children, make sure that the dog knows they are coming, esp if they are sleeping, teach them to stomp on the floor ect..that way they don't surprise the dog. I also recommend keeping nice bright ID stating he is deaf on your dog, so that if he gets loose he can be easily returned home.
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Angel

Little Angel
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 12, '11 7:24pm PST 
Aww thanks. smile

And I second Sapphira about the ID tag. Angel also has a tag stating he is deaf and vision impaired and it has helped us out once.

I don't think having a deaf dog is any more a full time job than having a hearing one. You do have to learn how to communicate with them differently, such as sign language, but you'd be surprised how fast they pick it up, especially if you have another dog. Rocket was very helpful with Angel learning his doggy manners, he learned when to sit before he learned the signal to sit. It really is impressive how quickly they learn to communicate. Angel is vision impaired as well as deaf, so we weren't able to teach him sign language, but in a matter of weeks he was able to pick up various cues from us about what he was supposed to do.


I think you sound like a great home for a deaf dog. I'll be keeping my fingers crossed for you guys.

Edited by author Sat Mar 12, '11 7:25pm PST

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Torie

If you can roll- in the dirt, do- it!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 3:01am PST 
Since dog obedience often uses visual cues you really don't really need to use anything some special. It is easier for all dogs to pay attention to these visual cues. I made up cues in agility and various tricks I teach Torie. Besides some people seem to be quite amazed at dogs that can understand hand signs. It is quite amusing. smile
(If you do teach some ASL signs you might have quite an amazed audience. BOL!)


Oh btw, I don't think that some of the agility organizations allow deaf dogs in competition. Don't ask why. I think it very narrow minded. Many other kinds of competitions do. (If it is just for fun agility then it doesn't matter much.) I just read though that there is some vaguely written rule-- may or may not apply to deaf dogs.

Sounds like a great dog.

--des
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 5:30am PST 
I have a deaf mini poodle puppy. The only thing I would add is that they are not great candidates for the dog park, at least mine isn't. He can't hear when the other dogs are coming up behind him and he sometimes reacts by snapping at them. Since these are all dogs that know him they don't get snappy back, but I think it might be a concern with unknown dogs.
The only other issue I had shouldn't be a problem for you in that it was the puppy biting. He was terrible, he would just reach out and grab whatever, usually my leg, and my usually "yelping" obviously didn't work.
This guy learned really quickly to always watch me, even when he was playing with the other dogs, so getting his attention has never been an issue. I always have lots of treats with me so when I catch him looking at me, I give the hand signal to come and pop him a great treat...it is now automatic with him!
The final issue with him is that he barks LOUD! It is something we are still working on, but I suspect it will always be somewhat of an issue with him when he is playing, etc.
I tried a vibrating collar but he was terrified of the vibration so that didn't work for him.
I personally think it is much easier for a deaf dog to be in a multiple dog household. Good luck with him!!!!
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Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 7:56am PST 
There's a lot of good info about training and resources on this site: Deaf Dog Training Tips

Don't forget to utilize the sense of smell as well. smile
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Lucky, NTD

Novice trick- dog!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 11:24am PST 
I know someone who trained his dead dog using a vibratian collar, rather than a clicker. wishes to you and your deaf puppy!
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Torie

If you can roll- in the dirt, do- it!
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 13, '11 3:30pm PST 
You know someone who trained his dead dog. BOL! smile
Just hoping this is a mistype.


--des
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