Lola Penelope

when a dog bites a human, doesn't break skin but bruising happens on site, whats her "bite inhibition"

About a week ago we were dog sitting, one was a GSD male. Lola loved him... a little to much. She kept getting in his face, doing the puppy submissive, I like you kisses on his muzzle. I think Brandon (the GSD) thought she is to old or just plain annoyed with it and growled and pinned her neck to the ground. I grabbed him and pulled him off and my friend grabbed Lola and pulled her back. Lola was freaked out and bite my friends arm. She did not break her skin, but a few days later I noticed 2 yellowing spots on my friends arm, and she said it was from this altercation. Now I'm worried about Lola's bite inhibition. She's 9 months now... will it get worse as she gets older or is this normal? We work at a Doggie Daycare, and she rarely gets in fights but has when someone brings in food. (this is a no no, a lot of dogs will fight for a treat especially Lola). Is there something I can do to help her bite inhibition?


Asked by Lola Penelope on May 15th 2009 in Other Behavior & Training
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Cookies 'n' Creme (1998-2011)

It was being suddenly grabbed and pulled back that provoked the bite. If a dog feels that it is being attacked or threatened, it's natural response is to growl and/or bite. Usually, dogs will growl as a warning before resorting to biting. If the warning is not heeded, they will probably bite.


Cookies 'n' Creme (1998-2011) answered on 5/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

My dog did the same thing. He's a sweet heart, but he got in a fight (I wasn't present for it) and when the handlers pulled the dogs apart the gal pulling my dog away got bit. He was so worked up that he redirected his energy right at her. It's somewhat normal for dogs to do that, but it doesn't make it ok, but I'm very aware of his ability to redirect when he gets really worked up.
I've only seen that behavior in him one other time, but it wasn't as severe.
Every other time he's had an altercation with another dog, he's been leashed and when it's broken up using the leash, he's totally fine.
When dogs get seriously worked up, their hormone levels go up and other chemicals in their bodies go up and they've got to release the energy on something.
Sorry, I don't have an answer on how to make it go away, but I just wanted you to know that from everything trainers and behaviorist tell me, redirecting is normal and I'm sure with some work it can be minimized.


Member 768404 answered on 5/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Dieta

I don't think it is nothing like that.
Your dog was reacting to what was going on at the time. It was accident sounds like.
By now, she should be spayed. So I think she is was just scared.


Dieta answered on 5/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer