Luka

How old should a puppy be before it is spayed?

I have a 6 month old cocker spaniel puppy. I've heard that I should wait until they are six months old before spaying, but I also see ads for puppies that are already spayed at 10 weeks, so I'm confused.


Asked by Luka on Feb 19th 2009 Tagged spay, puppy in Health & Wellness
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Sergeant

I would venture to say that your dog is old enough to be spayed, however this is, ultimately, something that your vet must decide.

I always spay a bitch before she has her first heat cycle. This allows for an easier surgery for both her and the vet, and can prevent many problems from occurring. The age is dependent on the dog. For example, your dog is a smaller breed, so you would want to wait until she was a certain weight, which should always be determined by your vet. Weight, age, size, and health will determine whether or not she's a good candidate for the surgery. If you find yourself having more questions, ask your vet.

P.S. - I would never spay my dog at only 10 weeks old - they are way too young and too under-developed for such a surgery to happen.


Sergeant answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Dieta

I would say 6 months is the time.


Dieta answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Kayak

They say six months is ideal. I like to give them time if I plan on neutering them at all to fill out and fully grow. But I think 6 months if fine for your situation.


Kayak answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Zackintosh CJ

I believe that you should spay (Or neuter) at least at 10 wks, if not earlier. Young puppies have less pain and recover faster than older ones.
If you have a giant breed like a Mastiff or Great Dane, then I would wait until 6 months or so because being fixed early can cause growth problems, but thats only for giant breeds, not ones like Cockers or other medium/large ones.
My dog (Lab/JRT mix) was fixed at 10 wks and he's had no ill effects.
Its a personal choice for you and your vet to make, but its healthiest if you have her fixed before her first heat, which can happen at 6 mo in some dogs. Some don't have their first heat until 8-9 months or later.


Zackintosh CJ answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Miss Buddie

My vet usually waits until 4 months to spay or neuter. Miss Buddie came from a rescue group and she was spayed at 10 weeks. I asked the vet about it and he said that if the vet is experienced in doing early spays it's fine. Buddie has developed normally and has had no problems from her surgery at all.


Miss Buddie answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Jet

Your dog is old enough. Our vet told us to wait until Jet was six months to be neutered. In my oppinion, people that alter very young pups don't know anything about raising a pup. This is ultimantley your vets decision, though.


Jet answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Cookies 'n' Creme (1998-2011)

6 months is the standard age, however some believe that it's best to wait until the dog is a year or two old to keep the lack of hormones from affecting the dog's growth.


Cookies 'n' Creme (1998-2011) answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


♥Molly♥

as early as 8 weeks.


♥Molly♥ answered on 2/19/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Dante

Puppies can safely be spayed as early as 8 weeks of age. However, most vets like to wait until 4-6 months of age. Dogs generally can go into heat at 6 months of age, and it is better to have them spayed before their first heat cycle because of the added health benefits. By fixing them before their first heat cycle you dramatically decrease her risk for mammary tumors later in life. So i would have Luka spayed as soon as you are able. FYI, there has been new research that suggests female dogs fixed before 4 months of age have a higher incidence of urinary incontinence later in life. Thank you for choosing to have her spayed and doing your part to end overpopulation!


Dante answered on 2/20/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer